Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 6359

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; biomaterial engineering; biocompatibility; biodegradable polymers; biopolymers; stem cell differentiation; biomechanical engineering; material characterization; bone regeneration

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Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11495, Saudi Arabia
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; hydrogel

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogel is a three-dimensional network structure with a polymer chain bonded through covalent and/or secondary bonds, which enables strong hydrogen bonding with water molecules. Hydrogel can contain drugs, cells, and a large amount of water which, when in contact with water, shows substantial swelling. Hydrogel can also be degraded by tissue engineering  by using the crosslinking method.

This Special Issue on “Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery” covers the theory of biopolymers for hydrogel fabrication, an introduction to various methods for hydrogel fabrication, drug loading/release effects, and recent developments in tissue engineering applications. Research on tissue engineering and the drug delivery of hydrogels has attracted considerable interest in the past decades. Recently, research on controlling drug release and tissue engineering applications through various methods, such as electrical/physical stimulation, biofunctional modification for targeting/sustained release, and cell encapsulation, has been conducted. This Special Issue welcomes contributions based on the application of the methodology and fabrication of different types of hydrogels for effective drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Dr. Jin-Oh Jeong
Dr. Mohammed Mahmoud. M. Badran
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • hydrogel
  • tissue engineering
  • smart drug delivery
  • biopolymers
 

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 3814 KiB  
Article
Optimized Synthesis of Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanoparticles for the Encapsulation of Flutamide
by Duarte Almeida, Mariana Dias, Beatriz Teixeira, Carolina Frazão, Mónica Almeida, Gil Gonçalves, Miguel Oliveira and Ricardo J. B. Pinto
Gels 2024, 10(4), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10040274 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Biopolymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have gained significant attention in several areas as an alternative to synthetic polymeric NPs due to growing environmental and immunological concerns. Among the most promising biopolymers is poly(lactic acid) (PLA), with a reported high degree of biocompatibility and biodegradability. In [...] Read more.
Biopolymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have gained significant attention in several areas as an alternative to synthetic polymeric NPs due to growing environmental and immunological concerns. Among the most promising biopolymers is poly(lactic acid) (PLA), with a reported high degree of biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, PLA NPs were synthesized according to a controlled gelation process using a combination of single-emulsion and nanoprecipitation methods. This study evaluated the influence of several experimental parameters for accurate control of the PLA NPs’ size distribution and aggregation. Tip sonication (as the stirring method), a PLA concentration of 10 mg/mL, a PVA concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, and low-molecular-weight PLA (Mw = 5000) were established as the best experimental conditions to obtain monodisperse PLA NPs. After gelification process optimization, flutamide (FLU) was used as a model drug to evaluate the encapsulation capability of the PLA NPs. The results showed an encapsulation efficiency of 44% for this cytostatic compound. Furthermore, preliminary cell viability tests showed that the FLU@PLA NPs allowed cell viabilities above 90% up to a concentration of 20 mg/L. The comprehensive findings showcase that the PLA NPs fabricated using this straightforward gelification method hold promise for encapsulating cytostatic compounds, offering a novel avenue for precise drug delivery in cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
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16 pages, 3755 KiB  
Article
Formulation and In Vivo Evaluation of Biofilm Loaded with Silver Sulfadiazine for Burn Healing
by Doaa Alshora, Lubna Ashri, Rihaf Alfaraj, Ahlam Alhusaini, Raeesa Mohammad, Nawal Alanaze, Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed M. Badran, Mounir Bekhit, Shaikha Alsaif, Modhi Alagili, Rehab A. Ali and Adel Jreebi
Gels 2023, 9(11), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9110855 - 29 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Infected burned skin is a life-threatening condition, which may lead to sepsis. The aims of this work are to formulate a biofilm composed of silver sulfadiazine (SSD), chitosan (CS), and sodium alginate (SA), and to evaluate its wound-healing effectiveness. A full factorial design [...] Read more.
Infected burned skin is a life-threatening condition, which may lead to sepsis. The aims of this work are to formulate a biofilm composed of silver sulfadiazine (SSD), chitosan (CS), and sodium alginate (SA), and to evaluate its wound-healing effectiveness. A full factorial design was used to formulate different matrix formulations. The prepared biofilm was tested for physicochemical, and in vitro release. The optimized formulation is composed of 0.833% of CS and 0.75% of SA. The release of SSD almost reached 100% after 6 h. The mechanical properties of the optimized formula were reasonable. The antibacterial activity for the optimized biofilm was significantly higher than that of blank biofilm, which is composed of CS and SA, p = 1.53922 × 10−12. Moreover, the in vivo study showed a 75% reduction in wound width when using the formulated SSD biofilm compared to standard marketed cream (57%) and the untreated group (0%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
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22 pages, 14791 KiB  
Article
Polyurethane Degradable Hydrogels Based on Cyclodextrin-Oligocaprolactone Derivatives
by Alexandra-Diana Diaconu, Corina-Lenuta Logigan, Catalina Anisoara Peptu, Constanta Ibanescu, Valeria Harabagiu and Cristian Peptu
Gels 2023, 9(9), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9090755 - 16 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 774
Abstract
Polymer networks based on cyclodextrin and polyethylene glycol were prepared through polyaddition crosslinking using isophorone diisocyanate. The envisaged material properties are the hydrophilic character, specific to PEG and cyclodextrins, and the capacity to encapsulate guest molecules in the cyclodextrin cavity through physical interactions. [...] Read more.
Polymer networks based on cyclodextrin and polyethylene glycol were prepared through polyaddition crosslinking using isophorone diisocyanate. The envisaged material properties are the hydrophilic character, specific to PEG and cyclodextrins, and the capacity to encapsulate guest molecules in the cyclodextrin cavity through physical interactions. The cyclodextrin was custom-modified with oligocaprolactone to endow the crosslinked material with a hydrolytically degradable character. SEM, DTG, and FTIR characterization methods have confirmed the morphology and structure of the prepared hydrogels. The influence of the crosslinking reaction feed was investigated through dynamic rheology. Further, thermal water swelling and hydrolytic degradation in basic conditions revealed the connectivity of the polymer network and the particular influence of the cyclodextrin amount in the crosslinking reaction feed on the material properties. Also, levofloxacin was employed as a model drug to investigate the drug loading and release capacity of the prepared hydrogels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
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Review

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28 pages, 3944 KiB  
Review
Cryogel Scaffolds for Tissue-Engineering: Advances and Challenges for Effective Bone and Cartilage Regeneration
by Vito Cosimo Carriero, Laura Di Muzio, Stefania Petralito, Maria Antonietta Casadei and Patrizia Paolicelli
Gels 2023, 9(12), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9120979 - 14 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1439
Abstract
Critical-sized bone defects and articular cartilage injuries resulting from trauma, osteonecrosis, or age-related degeneration can be often non-healed by physiological repairing mechanisms, thus representing a relevant clinical issue due to a high epidemiological incidence rate. Novel tissue-engineering approaches have been proposed as an [...] Read more.
Critical-sized bone defects and articular cartilage injuries resulting from trauma, osteonecrosis, or age-related degeneration can be often non-healed by physiological repairing mechanisms, thus representing a relevant clinical issue due to a high epidemiological incidence rate. Novel tissue-engineering approaches have been proposed as an alternative to common clinical practices. This cutting-edge technology is based on the combination of three fundamental components, generally referred to as the tissue-engineering triad: autologous or allogenic cells, growth-stimulating factors, and a scaffold. Three-dimensional polymer networks are frequently used as scaffolds to allow cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. In particular, cryogels give promising results for this purpose, thanks to their peculiar properties. Cryogels are indeed characterized by an interconnected porous structure and a typical sponge-like behavior, which facilitate cellular infiltration and ingrowth. Their composition and the fabrication procedure can be appropriately tuned to obtain scaffolds that match the requirements of a specific tissue or organ to be regenerated. These features make cryogels interesting and promising scaffolds for the regeneration of different tissues, including those characterized by very complex mechanical and physical properties, such as bones and joints. In this review, state-of-the-art fabrication and employment of cryogels for supporting effective osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation to allow for the regeneration of functional tissues is reported. Current progress and challenges for the implementation of this technology in clinical practice are also highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
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23 pages, 3195 KiB  
Review
Collagen-Based Hydrogels for the Eye: A Comprehensive Review
by Dhwani Rana, Nimeet Desai, Sagar Salave, Bharathi Karunakaran, Jyotsnendu Giri, Derajram Benival, Srividya Gorantla and Nagavendra Kommineni
Gels 2023, 9(8), 643; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9080643 - 09 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2280
Abstract
Collagen-based hydrogels have emerged as a highly promising platform for diverse applications in ophthalmology, spanning from drug delivery systems to biomedical interventions. This review explores the diverse sources of collagen, which give rise to different types of collagen protein. The critical isolation and [...] Read more.
Collagen-based hydrogels have emerged as a highly promising platform for diverse applications in ophthalmology, spanning from drug delivery systems to biomedical interventions. This review explores the diverse sources of collagen, which give rise to different types of collagen protein. The critical isolation and purification steps are discussed, emphasizing their pivotal role in preparing collagen for biomedical use. To ensure collagen quality and purity, and the suitability of collagen for targeted applications, a comprehensive characterization and quality control are essential, encompassing assessments of its physical, chemical, and biological properties. Also, various cross-linking collagen methods have been examined for providing insight into this crucial process. This comprehensive review delves into every facet of collagen and explores the wide-ranging applications of collagen-based hydrogels, with a particular emphasis on their use in drug delivery systems and their potential in diverse biomedical interventions. By consolidating current knowledge and advancements in the field, this review aims to provide a detailed overview of the utilization of engineered collagen-based hydrogels in ocular therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
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