Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024

A special issue of Gastrointestinal Disorders (ISSN 2624-5647).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 9086

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Professor and Founding Chair, Department of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
2. Department of Internal Medicine, Director of Gastroenterology Research and Director of the Center for Neurogastroenterology and GI Motility, Texas Tech University Medical Center and the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
3. Honorary Professor, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: the physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology of gastrointestinal smooth muscles; the role of the enteric nervous system and electrical activity relating to GI Motility disorders; the brain –gut integration and gut microbiota in functional GI disorders as well as the development of electrical stimulation and new Pharmacology in treating these entities
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, on featured papers in gastrointestinal disorders, aims to provide an advanced forum for displaying the latest, most relevant studies, case series with accompanying systematic literature reviews, as well as endoscopic technical expertise for instant dissemination in the field of gastroenterology in 2023–2024. It will publish comprehensive reviews, regular research papers, and short communications, etc.

Prof. Dr. Richard W. McCallum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gastrointestinal Disorders is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • gastrointestinal cancer (colorectal cancer, esophageal cancer, etc.)
  • coeliac disease
  • diet
  • Crohn’s disease
  • ethnicity
  • gastroparesis
  • hepatocellular carcinoma
  • gut microbiota
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • metabolic syndrome
  • gut–brain axis

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 886 KiB  
Article
Patient-Reported Outcomes and Survival Following Pancreatic Cancer Resection—Results from a Cross-Section Study
by Clare Toms, Charbel Sandroussi, David Yeo, James Morkaya, Carlo Pulitano and Daniel Steffens
Gastrointest. Disord. 2023, 5(4), 508-516; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord5040042 - 21 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1367
Abstract
The aims of this study were to assess patient-reported outcomes and the survival of patients following curative resection for pancreas cancer. Adult patients undergoing curative pancreatic resection between April 2014 and April 2019 across six major hospitals in Sydney were invited to complete [...] Read more.
The aims of this study were to assess patient-reported outcomes and the survival of patients following curative resection for pancreas cancer. Adult patients undergoing curative pancreatic resection between April 2014 and April 2019 across six major hospitals in Sydney were invited to complete the Short-Form 36 (SF-36v2) and the Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy—Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep) questionnaires. Time from surgery was categorised into four different time points: 3–11, 12–23, 24–35, and 36–62 months. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier and log-rank tests. A total of 278 patients underwent curative resection. Mean (SD) age was 65.0 (13.2), and 50.7% (n = 141) were males. Out of the 205 (74%) alive patients, 128 (62%) completed the study surveys. The physical component score and total FACT-Hep scores showed no significant changes over time. The mental component score improved from 3–11 months to 12–23 months (p = 0.009) and from 3–11 months to 36–62 months (p = 0.007). Survivorship showed a significant difference between malignancy, pre-malignancy, and benign disease groups, with 45.8 months (95%CI: 42.4–49.1), 40.3 months (95%CI: 36.4–44.2), and 41.3 months (95%CI: 37.9–44.9), respectively. For patients undergoing curative resection for pancreatic cancer, mental component scores improved over time, whereas overall survival outcomes seem to be influenced according to cancer pathology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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13 pages, 2807 KiB  
Article
Differentiation between Gastric and Colorectal Adenocarcinomas Based on Maspin, MLH1, PMS2 and K-Ras Concentrations Determined Using Stochastic Sensors
by Alexandru Adrian Bratei and Raluca-Ioana Stefan-van Staden
Gastrointest. Disord. 2023, 5(4), 487-499; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord5040040 - 06 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1333
Abstract
Background: Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas are a worldwide and some of the most important causes of death related to cancers. MLH1, PMS2, and K-Ras are some of the main molecules responsible for the control of cellular proliferation. They are widely used as biomarkers for the [...] Read more.
Background: Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas are a worldwide and some of the most important causes of death related to cancers. MLH1, PMS2, and K-Ras are some of the main molecules responsible for the control of cellular proliferation. They are widely used as biomarkers for the evaluation of the features of tumoral processes and the clinicopathological characteristics. They depend on the type of cells implied in the tumoral process, and it can be observed in the concentrations of them in different biological fluids. Maspin, also known as peptidase inhibitor 5 or serpin B5 is a tumor suppressor which inhibits invasion and angiogenesis and also regulates apoptosis, but it can also present oncogenic activity depending on tumor location and histology and on the subcellular maspin localization. Its correlations with gastric and colorectal carcinomas have been emphasized in a series of articles, and in this work, a method is used to quantify the concentrations of maspin in three biological fluids, allowing correlations with pathological features. Methods: Patients with their clinical and pathological features were selected from the database of the project GRAPHSENSGASTROINTES and used accordingly with the Ethics committee approval nr. 32647/2018 awarded by the County Emergency Hospital from Targu-Mures. Three kinds of samples have been analyzed (saliva, whole blood, and urine) using a stochastic method using stochastic microsensors. Results: The results obtained using stochastic sensors were correlated with the location of cancer, and there have been elaborated a series of criteria to differentiate gastric cancers from colorectal ones. Conclusions: There can be differentiation between the two types of cancers by using the concentrations of MLH1, PMS2, and K-Ras in saliva and urine samples or the levels of maspin in whole blood and urine or in whole blood, urine, and saliva. The data analysis led to a series of criteria for evaluation of the cancer location. Using only MLH1 and PMS2 concentrations in one of the two kinds of samples was only indicative and did not cover most cases. The use of the criteria only for MLH1 and PMS2 increased the probability of finding out the location, but the best results require the concentrations of K-Ras in the two kinds of samples as additional criteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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Review

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16 pages, 898 KiB  
Review
Diabetic Gastroparesis: Navigating Pathophysiology and Nutritional Interventions
by Alfredo Caturano, Massimiliano Cavallo, Davide Nilo, Gaetano Vaudo, Vincenzo Russo, Raffaele Galiero, Luca Rinaldi, Raffaele Marfella, Marcellino Monda, Giovanni Luca and Ferdinando Carlo Sasso
Gastrointest. Disord. 2024, 6(1), 214-229; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord6010016 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1137
Abstract
Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP) delays gastric emptying in diabetes patients, notably impacting those with type 1 and long-standing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms include early satiety, fullness, appetite loss, bloating, abdominal pain, and vomiting, arising from slow stomach-to-intestine food movement. DGP’s unpredictable nature complicates diagnosis [...] Read more.
Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP) delays gastric emptying in diabetes patients, notably impacting those with type 1 and long-standing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms include early satiety, fullness, appetite loss, bloating, abdominal pain, and vomiting, arising from slow stomach-to-intestine food movement. DGP’s unpredictable nature complicates diagnosis and blood glucose management, leading to severe complications like dehydration, malnutrition, and bezoar formation. Understanding DGP’s mechanisms is crucial for effective management. Vagal dysfunction, disturbances in the interstitial cells of Cajal, reduced neural nitric oxide synthase, and increased oxidative stress contribute to the complex pathophysiology. Accurate diagnosis demands a comprehensive approach, utilizing tools like gastric scintigraphy and the Gastric Emptying Breath Test. Considering the complex relationship between DGP and glycemia, managing blood glucose levels becomes paramount. Nutritional interventions, tailored to each patient, address malnutrition risks, emphasizing smaller, more frequent meals and liquid consistency. DGP’s complex nature necessitates collaborative efforts for enhanced diagnostic strategies, improved pathophysiological understanding, and compassionate management approaches. This comprehensive approach offers hope for a future where individuals with DGP can experience improved well-being and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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30 pages, 3939 KiB  
Review
Viral Liver Disease and Intestinal Gut–Liver Axis
by Elias Kouroumalis, Ioannis Tsomidis and Argyro Voumvouraki
Gastrointest. Disord. 2024, 6(1), 64-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord6010005 - 08 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1615
Abstract
The intestinal microbiota is closely related to liver diseases via the intestinal barrier and bile secretion to the gut. Impairment of the barrier can translocate microbes or their components to the liver where they can contribute to liver damage and fibrosis. The components [...] Read more.
The intestinal microbiota is closely related to liver diseases via the intestinal barrier and bile secretion to the gut. Impairment of the barrier can translocate microbes or their components to the liver where they can contribute to liver damage and fibrosis. The components of the barrier are discussed in this review along with the other elements of the so-called gut–liver axis. This bidirectional relation has been widely studied in alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. However, the involvement of microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of viral liver diseases have not been extensively studied, and controversial data have been published. Therefore, we reviewed data regarding the integrity and function of the intestinal barrier and the changes of the intestinal microbioma that contribute to progression of Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) infection. Their consequences, such as cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy, were also discussed in connection with therapeutic interventions such as the effects of antiviral eradication and the use of probiotics that may influence the outcome of liver disease. Profound alterations of the microbioma with significant reduction in microbial diversity and changes in the abundance of both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria were found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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29 pages, 1172 KiB  
Review
Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis—State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives
by Ana Ruivo, Rui Caetano Oliveira, Pedro Silva-Vaz and José Guilherme Tralhão
Gastrointest. Disord. 2023, 5(4), 580-608; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord5040046 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1479
Abstract
The current management of colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM) patients involves a multidisciplinary approach, with surgical resection remaining the primary curative option. The advances in liver surgery have improved outcomes, enabling more patients to undergo surgery successfully. In addition, the development of imaging [...] Read more.
The current management of colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM) patients involves a multidisciplinary approach, with surgical resection remaining the primary curative option. The advances in liver surgery have improved outcomes, enabling more patients to undergo surgery successfully. In addition, the development of imaging software has improved the preoperative planning and patient selection for surgery and other interventions. Systemic therapies, such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies, have enhanced the chances of complete resection. Targeted agents, in combination with chemotherapy, have shown efficacy in downstaging tumors and increasing resectability. The algorithm approach for these patients continues to evolve, driven by a deeper understanding of the underlying biology. Personalized medicine, guided by molecular profiling and the potential of liquid biopsies in this field, may lead to more tailored treatment strategies. A greater understanding of the immune microenvironment in CRLM may unlock the potential for immune checkpoint inhibitors and novel immunotherapies to become more prominent in the treatment landscape. This review explores the current state-of-the-art treatment of CRCLM and discusses promising future perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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Other

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9 pages, 1132 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Diagnostic Accuracy of Abdominal X-ray in Childhood Constipation: A Systematic Review of the Literature
by David Avelar Rodriguez, Ghaida Dahlwi, Michelle Gould, Margaret Marcon and Marc Benninga
Gastrointest. Disord. 2024, 6(1), 94-102; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord6010006 - 09 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1416
Abstract
Background: Previous systematic reviews have found insufficient and conflicting evidence for an association between the clinical and radiographic diagnosis of functional constipation. Abdominal X-ray is frequently used for the diagnosis of functional constipation in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to [...] Read more.
Background: Previous systematic reviews have found insufficient and conflicting evidence for an association between the clinical and radiographic diagnosis of functional constipation. Abdominal X-ray is frequently used for the diagnosis of functional constipation in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal X-ray for the evaluation of functional constipation in children. Results: Three studies were included in the final qualitative analysis. They were heterogeneous in their study design, definition of constipation, and radiologic parameters used to evaluate the abdominal X-rays. Sensitivities ranged from 73–92%, specificities ranged from 26–92%, and diagnostic accuracies ranged from 78–90%. Methods: This study involved a systematic review of English literature published between 2012 and 2022 covering children 2–18 years of age with a diagnosis of functional constipation in whom abdominal X-ray was performed. The databases searched include Medline, Embase, and Scopus. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) guidelines were followed. PROSPERO ID: CRD42022301833. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to support the use of abdominal X-ray as part of the diagnostic workup of functional constipation. More methodologically rigorous studies are needed to determine the utility of abdominal X-ray in the evaluation of functional constipation. The diagnosis of functional constipation should be based on history and clinical findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastrointestinal Disorders in 2023-2024)
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