Special Issue "Recent Advances in DSP-Based Optical Communications"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018) | Viewed by 10160

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Roger Giddings
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Bangor, UK
Interests: DSP-based optical communications; reconfigurable optical networks; convergence of fixed and mobile data networks; software defined networking at the physical layer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The relentless evolution of internet services and applications demands that future optical communication systems provide higher and higher data capacities and support increasingly dynamic data traffic patterns. In addition to these demands new technologies must still meet basic requirements such as cost restrictions, backwards compatibility and low power consumption. Future optical networks must therefore offer characteristics such as highly efficient use of network bandwidth, flexible and dynamic network reconfigurability, convergence of fixed and mobile data and software defined networks.  Digital signal processing (DSP) is a highly promising technology which has the potential to address the challenges facing future optical communication systems. DSP can be regarded as a highly powerful yet cost-effective technology due to today’s mass produced, advanced digital semiconductor technologies. Continuous developments in digital chip densities means the cost and power per DSP function is steadily decreasing with time, similarly the complexity of signal processing algorithms that can be implemented via DSP is also progressively increasing over time. DSP has been successfully deployed in coherent optical transceivers for long-haul applications for many years now and the use of DSP to increase long-haul link performance is an ongoing area of research.

The application of DSP to other optical communication networks such as metro, access, LANs and data centres, has seen a great deal of attention from researchers in recent years. DSP can be exploited for implementing functions such as highly spectrally efficient modulation formats for increased link capacities, transmission impairment mitigation for improved transmission performance and intelligent optical transceivers for software defined, reconfigurable networks. Due to the finite speed and precision of real DSP hardware however, real-time demonstrations are essential to fully validate new DSP techniques and more and more research is now addressing the challenges of real-time DSP implementation.

This special issue aims to present a collection of exciting papers, reporting the most recent advances in DSP-based techniques for application in optical communications. Example topics of interest are the application of DSP in areas such as: 

  • Advanced modulation formats for high spectral efficiency
  • Multiple access schemes
  • Dynamic bandwidth allocation
  • Fixed and mobile network convergence
  • Mobile fronthaul and backhaul links
  • Increased performance of IMDD optical transceivers
  • Increased performance of coherent optical transceivers
  • Software defined networking at the physical layer
  • Compensation of transmission link impairments
  • Fiber nonlinearity compensation
  • Interference cancellation
  • Real-time DSP-based demonstrations
  • DSP complexity and power consumption
Dr. Roger Giddings
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Modulation formats
  • Multiple access techniques
  • Dynamic bandwidth allocation
  • Network convergence
  • Software defined networking
  • Mobile fronthaul
  • Coherent transceivers
  • IMDD transceivers
  • Interference cancellation
  • Real-time DSP

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
DSP-Based 40 GB/s Lane Rate Next-Generation Access Networks
Future Internet 2018, 10(12), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi10120118 - 30 Nov 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2147
Abstract
To address the continuous growth in high-speed ubiquitous access required by residential users and enterprises, Telecommunication operators must upgrade their networks to higher data rates. For optical fiber access networks that directly connect end users to metro/regional network, capacity upgrade must be done [...] Read more.
To address the continuous growth in high-speed ubiquitous access required by residential users and enterprises, Telecommunication operators must upgrade their networks to higher data rates. For optical fiber access networks that directly connect end users to metro/regional network, capacity upgrade must be done in a cost- and energy-efficient manner. 40 Gb/s is the possible lane rate for the next generation passive optical networks (NG-PONs). Ideally, existing 10 G PON components could be reused to support 40 Gb/s lane-rate NG-PON transceiver, which requires efficient modulation format and digital signal processing (DSP) to alleviate the bandwidth limitation and fiber dispersion. The major contribution of this work is to offer insight performance comparisons of 40 Gb/s lane rate electrical three level Duobinary, optical Duobinary, and four-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) for incorporating low complex DSPs, including linear and nonlinear Volterra equalization, as well as maximum likelihood sequence estimation. Detailed analysis and comparison of the complexity of various DSP algorithms are performed. Transceiver bandwidth optimization is also undertaken. The results show that the choices of proper modulation format and DSP configuration depend on the transmission distances of interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in DSP-Based Optical Communications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Clock Recovery Challenges in DSP-Based Coherent Single-Mode and Multi-Mode Optical Systems
Future Internet 2018, 10(7), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi10070059 - 26 Jun 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2698
Abstract
We present an analysis of clock recovery algorithms in both polarization division multiplexing systems and mode division multiplexing systems. The impact of inter-polarization time skew and polarization mode dispersion in single-mode fibers, as well as the combined impact of mode mixing and mode [...] Read more.
We present an analysis of clock recovery algorithms in both polarization division multiplexing systems and mode division multiplexing systems. The impact of inter-polarization time skew and polarization mode dispersion in single-mode fibers, as well as the combined impact of mode mixing and mode group delay spread in multi-mode fibers under different coupling regimes are investigated. Results show that although the clock tone vanishing has a known solution for single-mode systems, in multi-mode systems even for low group delay spread, strong coupling will cause clock tone extinction, making it harder to implement an effective clock recovery scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in DSP-Based Optical Communications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Harnessing machine learning for fiber-induced nonlinearity mitigation in long-haul coherent optical OFDM
Future Internet 2019, 11(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi11010002 - 20 Dec 2018
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 3070
Abstract
Coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) has attracted a lot of interest in optical fiber communications due to its simplified digital signal processing (DSP) units, high spectral-efficiency, flexibility, and tolerance to linear impairments. However, CO-OFDM’s high peak-to-average power ratio imposes high vulnerability [...] Read more.
Coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) has attracted a lot of interest in optical fiber communications due to its simplified digital signal processing (DSP) units, high spectral-efficiency, flexibility, and tolerance to linear impairments. However, CO-OFDM’s high peak-to-average power ratio imposes high vulnerability to fiber-induced non-linearities. DSP-based machine learning has been considered as a promising approach for fiber non-linearity compensation without sacrificing computational complexity. In this paper, we review the existing machine learning approaches for CO-OFDM in a common framework and review the progress in this area with a focus on practical aspects and comparison with benchmark DSP solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in DSP-Based Optical Communications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
A Review of DSP-Based Enabling Technologies for Cloud Access Networks
Future Internet 2018, 10(11), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi10110109 - 15 Nov 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1807
Abstract
Optical access networks, metro networks and mobile data networks are facing rapidly evolving demands, not only is it essential to satisfy the unyielding need for increased user bandwidths, but future networks must also support the growing wide variation in traffic dynamics and characteristics, [...] Read more.
Optical access networks, metro networks and mobile data networks are facing rapidly evolving demands, not only is it essential to satisfy the unyielding need for increased user bandwidths, but future networks must also support the growing wide variation in traffic dynamics and characteristics, due to various emerging technologies, such as cloud-based services, the Internet-of-Things (IoT) and 5G mobile systems, and due to growing trends, such as the proliferation of mobile devices and the rapidly increasing popularity of video-on-demand services. To be cost-effective and commercially sustainable, future optical networks must offer features, such as, dynamic reconfigurability, highly efficient use of network resources, elastic bandwidth provisioning with fine granularity, network sliceabilty and software defined networking (SDN). To meet these requirements Cloud Access Networks (CANs) are proposed which require a number of flexible, adaptive and reconfigurable networking elements. By exploiting digital signal processing (DSP) we have proposed a digital orthogonal filter-based multiplexing technique to implement CANs with multiplexed, independent optical channels at the wavelength, sub-wavelength, and orthogonal sub-band levels. This paper reviews the overall CAN concept, the operating principles of the various CAN network elements and presents an overview of the research work we have undertaken in order to validate the feasibility of the proposed technologies which includes real-time DSP-based demonstrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in DSP-Based Optical Communications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop