E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Rhizosphere Dynamics under Global Change"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ina C. Meier

Plant Ecology, Albrecht von Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen, Untere Karspüle 2, 37073 Göttingen, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: global change ecology, forest ecosystems, plant-mycorrhiza-soil feedbacks, rhizosphere biogeochemistry, biodiversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main components of anthropogenic global change will affect the carbon (C) sink strength and biogeochemistry of the terrestrial vegetation. Forest soils currently represent net sinks for anthropogenic C, but the degree to which they will persist as C sinks in the wake of rising atmospheric CO2 and temperature, summer droughts, and intensified management is uncertain. It has been suggested that the fate of these sinks hinges on plant‑microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, where plants provide C as an energy subsidy to fuel microbes to convert nutrients to plant-available forms via a microbial priming effect.

The aim of this Special Issue is to analyze the importance of rhizosphere dynamics for forest responses to global change. I invite manuscripts at the interface of the fields of root, mycorrhiza, and soil ecology; biogeochemistry; and belowground biodiversity. I encourage reports on the development of new methods and cutting-edge research, which can improve our ability to include rhizosphere dynamics in models that predict the consequences of climate and land-use change for biogeochemical cycles and forest functioning.

Dr. Ina C. Meier
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • biodiversity loss
  • carbon sequestration
  • ectomycorrhiza
  • extreme climatic events
  • fine root decomposition
  • fine root turnover
  • functional complementarity
  • land carbon sink
  • microbial activity
  • nitrogen deposition
  • phosphorus limitation
  • progressive nitrogen limitation
  • rhizodeposition
  • root exudation

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Soil Physicochemical Properties and the Rhizosphere Soil Fungal Community in a Mulberry (Morus alba L.)/Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Intercropping System
Forests 2019, 10(2), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020167
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 10 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2989 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A better understanding of soil fungal communities is very useful in revealing the effects of an agroforestry system and would also help us to understand the fungi-mediated effects of agricultural practices on the processes of soil nutrient cycling and crop productivity. Compared to [...] Read more.
A better understanding of soil fungal communities is very useful in revealing the effects of an agroforestry system and would also help us to understand the fungi-mediated effects of agricultural practices on the processes of soil nutrient cycling and crop productivity. Compared to conventional monoculture farming, agroforestry systems have obvious advantages in improving land use efficiency and maintaining soil physicochemical properties, reducing losses of water, soil material, organic matter, and nutrients, as well as ensuring the stability of yields. In this study, we attempted to investigate the impact of a mulberry/alfalfa intercropping system on the soil physicochemical properties and the rhizosphere fungal characteristics (such as the diversity and structure of the fungal community), and to analyze possible correlations among the planting pattern, the soil physicochemical factors, and the fungal community structure. In the intercropping and monoculture systems, we determined the soil physicochemical properties using chemical analysis and the fungal community structure with MiSeq sequencing of the fungal ITS1 region. The results showed that intercropping significantly improved the soil physicochemical properties of alfalfa (total nitrogen, alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen, available potassium, and total carbon contents). Sequencing results showed that the dominant taxonomic groups were Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Mucoromycota. Intercropping increased the fungal richness of mulberry and alfalfa rhizosphere soils and improved the fungal diversity of mulberry. The diversity and structure of the fungal community were predominantly influenced by both the planting pattern and soil environmental factors (total nitrogen, total phosphate, and total carbon). Variance partitioning analysis showed that the planting pattern explained 25.9% of the variation of the fungal community structure, and soil environmental factors explained 63.1% of the variation. Planting patterns and soil physicochemical properties conjointly resulted in changes of the soil fungal community structure in proportion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizosphere Dynamics under Global Change)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Estimating Fine Root Production from Ingrowth Cores and Decomposed Roots in a Bornean Tropical Rainforest
Forests 2019, 10(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010036
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 26 December 2018 / Accepted: 29 December 2018 / Published: 7 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1815 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research highlights: Estimates of fine root production using ingrowth cores are strongly influenced by decomposed roots in the cores during the incubation period and should be accounted for when calculating fine root production (FRP). Background and Objectives: The ingrowth core method [...] Read more.
Research highlights: Estimates of fine root production using ingrowth cores are strongly influenced by decomposed roots in the cores during the incubation period and should be accounted for when calculating fine root production (FRP). Background and Objectives: The ingrowth core method is often used to estimate fine root production; however, decomposed roots are often overlooked in estimates of FRP. Uncertainty remains on how long ingrowth cores should be installed and how FRP should be calculated in tropical forests. Here, we aimed to estimate FRP by taking decomposed fine roots into consideration. Specifically, we compared FRP estimates at different sampling intervals and using different calculation methods in a tropical rainforest in Borneo. Materials and Methods: Ingrowth cores were installed with root litter bags and collected after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. FRP was estimated based on (1) the difference in biomass at different sampling times (differential method) and (2) sampled biomass at just one sampling time (simple method). Results: Using the differential method, FRP was estimated at 447.4 ± 67.4 g m−2 year−1 after 12 months, with decomposed fine roots accounting for 25% of FRP. Using the simple method, FRP was slightly higher than that in the differential method after 12 months (516.3 ± 45.0 g m−2 year−1). FRP estimates for both calculation methods using data obtained in the first half of the year were much higher than those using data after 12-months of installation, because of the rapid increase in fine root biomass and necromass after installation. Conclusions: Therefore, FRP estimates vary with the timing of sampling, calculation method and presence of decomposed roots. Overall, the ratio of net primary production (NPP) of fine roots to total NPP in this study was higher than that previously reported in the Neotropics, indicating high belowground carbon allocation in this forest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizosphere Dynamics under Global Change)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Contrasting Rhizospheric and Heterotrophic Components of Soil Respiration during Growing and Non-Growing Seasons in a Temperate Deciduous Forest
Forests 2019, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010008
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 25 December 2018
PDF Full-text (1493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The contributions of heterotrophic respiration (RH) to total soil respiration (RS) for the non-growing season, growing season, and annual period are 84.8%, 60.7%, and 63.3%, respectively.Few studies have partitioned RS into its rhizospheric (RR [...] Read more.
The contributions of heterotrophic respiration (RH) to total soil respiration (RS) for the non-growing season, growing season, and annual period are 84.8%, 60.7%, and 63.3%, respectively.Few studies have partitioned RS into its rhizospheric (RR) and heterotrophic components throughout the year in northern forest ecosystems. Our objectives were to quantify the contributions of non-growing season and heterotrophic respiration. We conducted a trenching experiment to quantify RR and RH in a temperate deciduous forest in Northeast China over two years using chamber methods. Temperature sensitivities (Q10) for RS and for RH were both much higher in the non-growing season (November to April) than those in the growing season. The Q10 for RS was higher than Q10 for RH in both seasons, indicating a higher temperature sensitivity of roots versus microorganisms. Mean non-growing season RS, RH, and RR for the two years were 94, 79 and 14 g carbon (C) m−2, respectively, which contributed 10.8%, 14.5%, and 4.5% to the corresponding annual fluxes (869, 547 and 321 g C m−2 year−1, respectively). The contributions of RH to RS for the non-growing season, growing season, and annual period were 84.8%, 60.7%, and 63.3%, respectively. Using the same contribution of non-growing season RS to annual RS, to scale growing season measurements, to the annual scale would introduce significant biases on annual RH (−34 g C m−2 yr−1 or −6%) and RR (16 g C m−2 yr−1 or 5%).We concluded that it was important to take non-growing season measurements in terms of accurately partitioning RS components in northern forests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizosphere Dynamics under Global Change)
Figures

Figure 1

Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top