E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Forest Post-Fire Regeneration"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Leonor Calvo

Universidad de León: León, Castilla y León, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Wildfire effects, fire Recurrence, burnt severity, Vegetation regeneration, Perturbations, fire-prone ecosystems
Guest Editor
Dr. Susana Suárez-Seoane

Universidad de León: León, Castilla y León, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Landscape ecology, species distribution modelling, global environmental change, remote sensing, wildfires
Guest Editor
Dr. Elena Marcos

Universidad de León: León, Castilla y León, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0034987291567
Interests: Atmospheric pollution, effects of perturbations on soil and vegetation nutrients, forestry, soil burn severity, soil quality
Guest Editor
Dr. Angela Taboada

Universidad de León: León, Castilla y León, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Applied ecology, global environmental change, wildfires, forestry, ecosystem services, trophic interactions, atmospheric pollution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decades, forest systems have suffered an increase in the occurrence, extent, and severity of wildfires that affect their post-fire natural regeneration and their resilience to future fires. Moreover, the altered resilience to fire of forest systems under different environmental conditions endangers their ability to supply public goods and ecosystem services to society. Such changes in the post-fire response of forest systems are particularly critical when they are subjected to large fires that are an even more frequent phenomenon. Vegetation recovery after a fire is started by seedling recruitment from a seed bank or by sprouting from below-ground vegetative buds. Life-forms and other life historical features interact with regeneration strategies and with physical and chemical components of the environment, creating a complex framework within which regeneration takes place. Knowledge of the response of forests to fire is of crucial importance for management purposes, especially when the objective is to maintain their biodiversity and to transform them into more resilient systems. This Special Issue consists of a presentation of high quality scientific papers on the effects of prescribed fires on forest ecosystems, post-fire regeneration after wildfires, and spatial models of post-fire regeneration, in order to increase knowledge to promote efficient forest system management strategies to conserve the ecosystem services they provide.

Dr. Leonor Calvo
Dr. Susana Suárez-Seoane
Dr. Elena Marcos
Dr. Angela Taboada
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest fires
  • fire recurrence
  • fire severity
  • vegetation regeneration
  • ecosystem services
  • resilience
  • spatial models
  • remote sensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Herbaceous Layer Interference on the Post-Fire Regeneration of a Serotinous Pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) across Two Seedling Ages
Forests 2019, 10(1), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010074
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 20 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1361 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Herbaceous vegetation is a major source of interference with the regeneration of woody species. This is particularly the case after forest fires, as a dense herbaceous layer usually regenerates naturally. Although the competitive effect of the herbaceous vegetation upon tree seedlings has been [...] Read more.
Herbaceous vegetation is a major source of interference with the regeneration of woody species. This is particularly the case after forest fires, as a dense herbaceous layer usually regenerates naturally. Although the competitive effect of the herbaceous vegetation upon tree seedlings has been widely studied, there are still gaps in knowledge for management related to the effect of tree seedling age and size on the outcome of the interaction. In this study, we seek to determine the response of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) seedlings to herbaceous competition at two different seedling ages. For that, two treatments of herbaceous competition were implemented, namely unweeded (no action around pine seedlings) and weeded (herbaceous cover removed around pine seedlings). Treatments were conducted twice (2 and 4 years after the fire), and we monitored seedling survival and growth at the end of each growing season. The treatments were implemented across three adjacent landscape units that differed in the management of burned wood and that are representative of common post-fire scenarios: no intervention, salvage logging, and an intermediate degree of intervention. Weeding increased seedling survival from 44.7% to 67.8% when seedlings were 2 years old, but had no effect for four-year-old seedlings, which showed 99% survival. Seedling growth also increased in the weeding treatment, but only slightly. Moreover, growth (and survival for two-year-old seedlings) was strongly correlated with initial seedling size, particularly in the case of two-year-old seedlings. Initial pine seedling height was strongly and positively correlated with the height of the herbaceous layer, supporting the existence of microsite features that promote plant growth above competitive effects. The results support that management actions conducive to foster post-fire pine forest restoration in this Mediterranean ecosystem should reduce herbaceous competition at early stages after fire (second or third year) and focus on larger seedlings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Post-Fire Regeneration)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Composite Burn Index and Land Surface Temperature for Assessing Soil Burn Severity in Mediterranean Fire-Prone Pine Ecosystems
Forests 2018, 9(8), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9080494
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
PDF Full-text (2172 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We analysed the relationship between burn severity indicators, from remote sensing and field observations, and soil properties after a wildfire in a fire-prone Mediterranean ecosystem. Our study area was a large wildfire in a Pinus pinaster forest. Burn severity from remote sensing was [...] Read more.
We analysed the relationship between burn severity indicators, from remote sensing and field observations, and soil properties after a wildfire in a fire-prone Mediterranean ecosystem. Our study area was a large wildfire in a Pinus pinaster forest. Burn severity from remote sensing was identified by studying immediate post-fire Land Surface Temperature (LST). We also evaluated burn severity in the field applying the Composite Burn Index (CBI) in a total of 84 plots (30 m diameter). In each plot we evaluated litter consumption, ash colour and char depth as visual indicators. We collected soil samples and pH, soil organic carbon, dry aggregate size distribution (MWD), aggregate stability and water repellency were analysed. A controlled heating of soil was also carried out in the laboratory, with soil from the control plots, to compare with the changes produced in soils affected by different severity levels in the field. Our results shown that changes in soil properties affected by wildfire were only observed in soil aggregation in the high severity situation. The laboratory-controlled heating showed that temperatures of about 300 °C result in a significant reduction in soil organic carbon and MWD. Furthermore, soil organic carbon showed a significant decrease when LST values increased. Char depth was the best visual indicator to show changes in soil properties (mainly physical properties) in large fires that occur in Mediterranean pine forests. We conclude that CBI and post-fire LST can be considered good indicators of soil burn severity since both indicate the impact of fire on soil properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Post-Fire Regeneration)
Figures

Figure 1

Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top