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Special Issue "Tree Crown Dynamics and Morphology"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Thomas J. Dean

Quantitative Silviculture and Forest Ecology School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University 110 LSU Union Square 210 RNR Bldg Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 225-328-0930
Fax: 225-578-4227
Interests: Quantitative silviculture; Production ecology; Biomechanics; Growth-growing stock relationships; Crown dynamics; Self-thinning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crown morphology determines the internal arrangement of foliage within the bulk canopy, which affects carbon assimilation and ultimately forest production. Trees display a wide variety of crown morphologies, which create a wide range of effects on the structure and functioning of forests, especially in mixed and multi-aged stands. Basic crown structure is modified by light attenuation and by intercrown abrasions. Foliage is ephemeral, dying from old age and shade, replacing itself at the top and sides of the crown. Various growth models are based on the functional relationships between foliage and the stem and branches. Growth occurs because of the redistribution of foliage and the need to add sapwood to accommodate new foliage and cross-sectional area to accommodate new mechanical forces. Better understanding the functional relationships between crown morphology and crown dynamics will improve not only the basic knowledge of tree function and structure, but also the practical application of density management and growth–growing stock relations in pure and mixed stands and in single- and multi-aged stands. For this Special Issue, I invite papers that contribute to our understanding of canopy dynamics and the functional relationships between foliage and stem growth and canopy structure, both physiological and mechanical.

Prof. Dr. Thomas J. Dean
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • leaf area
  • growth
  • pipe model
  • biomechanics
  • stand density
  • composition
  • age structure

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Intra-Ring Variations and Interrelationships for Selected Wood Anatomical and Physical Properties of Thuja Occidentalis L.
Forests 2019, 10(4), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10040339
Received: 3 March 2019 / Revised: 11 April 2019 / Accepted: 15 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
Intra-ring variation in wood density and tracheid anatomical properties and wood property interrelationships were investigated in Thuja occidentalis L. Samples were taken from three stands in Abitibi–Témiscamingue, Quebec, Canada. The structure of T. occidentalis wood is simple, homogeneous and uniform, which is desirable [...] Read more.
Intra-ring variation in wood density and tracheid anatomical properties and wood property interrelationships were investigated in Thuja occidentalis L. Samples were taken from three stands in Abitibi–Témiscamingue, Quebec, Canada. The structure of T. occidentalis wood is simple, homogeneous and uniform, which is desirable for wooden structures that require wood uniformity. From early- to latewood, cell and lumen diameter decreased, while cell wall thickness increased. These changes led to an increase of the cell wall proportion. Wood ring density and width interrelationships were weaker in mature wood compared to juvenile wood. Earlywood density is the more important in determining mature wood density than latewood density and proportion. Earlywood density explains 92% and 89% of the variation in juvenile and mature wood density, respectively. The negative relationship between ring density and width, although significant, was low and tends to weaken with increasing tree age, thus providing the opportunity for silvicultural practices to improve both growth and wood density. Ring width was positively and strongly correlated to early- and latewood width, but negatively correlated to tracheid length and latewood proportion. Accordingly, increases in ring width produce smaller tracheids and wider earlywood without a corresponding increase in latewood. Practical implications of the results are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tree Crown Dynamics and Morphology)
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Open AccessArticle Functional Crown Architecture of Five Temperate Broadleaf Tree Species: Vertical Gradients in Leaf Morphology, Leaf Angle, and Leaf Area Density
Forests 2019, 10(3), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10030265
Received: 6 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 8 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
The morphology, inclination, and spatial distribution of leaves in different parts of tree crowns are important determinants of the radiation, momentum, and gas exchange between the canopy and the atmosphere. However, it is not well known how these foliage-related traits vary among species [...] Read more.
The morphology, inclination, and spatial distribution of leaves in different parts of tree crowns are important determinants of the radiation, momentum, and gas exchange between the canopy and the atmosphere. However, it is not well known how these foliage-related traits vary among species differing in successional status. We measured leaf size, leaf mass area (LMA), leaf inclination (angle to the horizontal), leaf area density (LAD), total leaf area (leaf area index, LAI), and leaf area distribution across the crown in adult trees of five common, early to late-successional tree species (Betula pendula Roth, Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Carpinus betulus L., Tilia cordata Mill., and Fagus sylvatica L.) using different canopy access techniques and the harvest of foliated trees (29 trees in total). Leaf size increased continuously with crown depth in B. pendula and T. cordata but peaked at mid-crown in Q. petraea, C. betulus, and F. sylvatica to decrease toward the shade crown. By contrast, LMA and leaf angle decreased continuously with crown depth in all species, but the pattern of vertical change varied. The mid/late- and late-successional species had higher LAI, lower shade-leaf LMA, lower leaf angles (shade and sun crown), and higher LAD in the uppermost sun crown in comparison to early successional B. pendula. We assume that the most peripheral sun leaf layer is partly acting as a shield against excess radiation, with foliage properties depending on the structure of the shade crown. We conclude that the vertical change in leaf morphology, inclination, and spatial distribution in tree crowns is highly species specific, with partial dependence on the species’ position in succession. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tree Crown Dynamics and Morphology)
Figures

Figure 1

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