Measurement and Assessment of Carbon and Water Fluxes in Forest Ecosystem

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2023) | Viewed by 6738

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, Federal University of Paraíba/CCEN, João Pessoa 58051-900, PB, Brazil
Interests: land use and cover; 3D mapping; image classification; predicting; climate change; SWAT model; GIS applications; surface temperature
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Guest Editor
Key Lab of Water and Sediment Science of Ministry of Education, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Interests: water resources assessment; water resources management; environmental flow; hydrological modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests are a critical component of the global carbon cycle and important sources of water. Forests are also vital to comprehensive, landscape-scale adaptation responses to climate change. A good forest ecological carbon sequestration capacity requires sustainable and efficient water-use efficiency. We can enhance forest ecosystem water utilization through improving forests’ carbon sequestration capacity and impact mechanism to increase carbon absorption and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. For this, it is necessary to carry out research on carbon flux changes and carbon water flux. Forest ecosystems differ globally, necessitating the measurement and assessment of carbon and water fluxes in different forest ecosystems to achieve carbon neutralization and peak.

This Special Issue calls for submissions contributing new theories, methods, and technologies for measuring and assessing carbon and water fluxes. It aims to provide an up-to-date compendium of recent research in this field worldwide, providing an opportunity for researchers to present their findings on the measurement and assessment of carbon and water fluxes in forest ecosystems and their relationship to climate change.

Papers showing novel and/or relevant techniques for the measurement and assessment of carbon and water fluxes in forests will be considered. Review papers are also welcome.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Variability in carbon and water fluxes;
  • Forest succession effects on forest carbon stores and/or radiative balances;
  • Quantifying carbon stores within forests;
  • Temporal and spatial scaling of forest carbon stores and/or radiative balances;
  • Influences of deforestation on carbon loss and water fluxes;
  • Effects of climate adaptation strategies on forest carbon stores and/or radiative balances;
  • Carbon and water flux models and simulation;
  • Ecological system recovery and protection of forests.

Dr. Celso Augusto Guimarães Santos
Dr. Richarde Marques Da Silva
Prof. Dr. Chunhui Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon and Water Fluxes
  • carbon stores
  • carbon balances
  • carbon loss
  • forest ecological system

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 9538 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Water and Carbon Estimation Models in the Caatinga Biome Based on Remote Sensing
by Michele L. de Oliveira, Carlos Antonio Costa dos Santos, Francineide Amorim Costa Santos, Gabriel de Oliveira, Celso Augusto Guimarães Santos, Ulisses Alencar Bezerra, John Elton de B. L. Cunha and Richarde Marques da Silva
Forests 2023, 14(4), 828; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14040828 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1476
Abstract
The study of energy, water, and carbon exchanges between ecosystems and the atmosphere is important in understanding the role of vegetation in regional microclimates. However, they are still relatively scarce when it comes to Caatinga vegetation. This study aims to identify differences in [...] Read more.
The study of energy, water, and carbon exchanges between ecosystems and the atmosphere is important in understanding the role of vegetation in regional microclimates. However, they are still relatively scarce when it comes to Caatinga vegetation. This study aims to identify differences in the dynamics of critical environmental variables such as net radiation (Rn), evapotranspiration (ET), and carbon fluxes (gross primary production, GPP) in contrasting recovered Caatinga (dense Caatinga, DC) and degraded Caatinga (sparse Caatinga, SC) in the state of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil. Estimates were performed using the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), and comparisons between estimated and measured data were conducted based on the coefficient of determination (R2). The fluxes were measured using the Eddy Covariance (EC) method for comparison with the same variables derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the Terra satellite. The estimates showed higher Rn values for the DC, indicating that this area should have greater energy availability for physical, biological, and chemical processes. The R2 between daily Rn estimates and observations was 0.93. The ET estimated using the SEBAL showed higher differences in relation to the observed values; however, it presented better spatial discrimination of the surface features. The MOD16A2 algorithm, however, presented ET values closer to the observed data and agreed with the seasonality of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). The DC generally showed higher ET values than the SC, while the MODIS data (GPP MOD17A2H) presented a temporal behavior closer to the observations. The difference between the two areas was more evident in the rainy season. The R2 values between GPP and GPP MOD17A2H were 0.76 and 0.65 for DC and SC, respectively. In addition, the R2 values for GPP Observed and GPP modeled were lower, i.e., 0.28 and 0.12 for the DC and SC, respectively. The capture of CO2 is more evident for the DC considering the whole year, with the SC showing a notable increase in CO2 absorption only in the rainy season. The GPP estimated from the MOD17A2H showed a predominant underestimation but evidenced the effects of land use and land cover changes over the two areas for all seasons. Full article
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21 pages, 5614 KiB  
Article
Assessing Green Infrastructures Using GIS and the Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Method: The Case of the Al Baha Region (Saudi Arabia)
by Babikir Mobarak, Raid Shrahily, Alsharif Mohammad and Abdulrhman Ali Alzandi
Forests 2022, 13(12), 2013; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13122013 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2036
Abstract
Among the Saudi Vision 2030 programs is the Green Saudi Initiative, which aims to protect the environment, energy conversion, and sustainability projects to build a sustainable future. In the present paper, Green Infrastructures (GI) were assessed, analyzed, and mapped using GIS and Analytic [...] Read more.
Among the Saudi Vision 2030 programs is the Green Saudi Initiative, which aims to protect the environment, energy conversion, and sustainability projects to build a sustainable future. In the present paper, Green Infrastructures (GI) were assessed, analyzed, and mapped using GIS and Analytic Hierarchy Process-based-Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Method (AHP-MCDM). Ten criteria were selected to elaborate the GI suitability map (DEM, slope, topographic position index, rainfall, distance to the water lines, topographic wetness index, distance to the road, wind speed, housing income group high (high-income people) map, employment in the agricultural sector, and land use land change). The results revealed four classes of suitability: Poor, Fair, Good, and Excellent. The “Excellent” area for GI planning was estimated at 983 km2 (9%), whereas the “Good” area covered 36% (3987 km2). The excellent and good areas for GI were more localized in the central part of the Al Baha region in the areas of Al Bahah, Elmandaq, Alatawlah, and the central part of Buljurshi. According to the obtained results, the southern part of the study is not suitable for GI planning; this is explained by the large area of barren land and sand. The results obtained by this research may help managers and decision-makers in future planning for GI areas in the Al Baha region. Full article
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24 pages, 7964 KiB  
Article
Land Use Land Cover Change Analysis for Urban Growth Prediction Using Landsat Satellite Data and Markov Chain Model for Al Baha Region Saudi Arabia
by Mohammad Alsharif, Abdulrhman Ali Alzandi, Raid Shrahily and Babikir Mobarak
Forests 2022, 13(10), 1530; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13101530 - 20 Sep 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2445
Abstract
Land Use Land Cover Change (LULCC) and urban growth prediction and analysis are two of the best methods that can help decision-makers for better sustainable management and planning of socioeconomic development in the countries. In the present paper, the growth of urban land [...] Read more.
Land Use Land Cover Change (LULCC) and urban growth prediction and analysis are two of the best methods that can help decision-makers for better sustainable management and planning of socioeconomic development in the countries. In the present paper, the growth of urban land use was analyzed and predicted in all districts of the El Baha region (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) based on high-resolution Landsat, 5, 7, and 8 satellite imagery during the period of study between 1985–2021. Using remote sensing techniques, the LULCC were obtained based on the maximum likelihood classification (MLC), where the geographic information system (GIS) had been used for mapping LULCC classes. Furthermore, Markov cellular automata (MCA) in Idrisi TerrSet was applied for assessing the future growth of urban land use between 2021–2047. The findings of the LULCC analysis based on the MLC indicate great socioeconomic development during the study period and that the urban expansion was at the expense of rangeland, forest and shrubland, and barren land and sand areas, with the contribution of each in the built-up area estimated to be around 9.1% (179.7 km2), 33.4% (656.3 km2) and 57.5% (1131.5 km2), respectively. The simulation of the future LULCC period 2021–2047 revealed a loss in rangeland, forest and shrubland, and barren land and sand by 565, 144 and 105 km2, respectively, where rangeland is the most influenced, its land cover will decrease from 4002 to 3437 km2. From the obtained results based on MCA, urban growth is predicted to be large and it is estimated at around 2607 km2 until the year 2047 with a net increase of 811 km2. The results obtained from this study may provide information to help decision-makers to implement efficient practices for future planning and management of the growth of urban land use, especially Saudi vision 2030. Full article
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