Special Issue "Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mahmoud Reda Taha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction & Environmental Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
Interests: smart materials and structures and emerging construction technologies to enable resilient and sustainable infrastructure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has been significant progress in state-of-the-art research and industrial applications for fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) in infrastructure applications. This Special Issue of Fibers looks forward to communicating to the scientific and engineering communities the progress made in research and development of FRP for infrastructure applications. We are particularly interested in innovative and original research examining new fiber materials, FRP incorporating hybrid fiber systems, using nanotechnology to improve FRP characteristics, new structural systems incorporating FRP, such as, but not limited to, lightweight bridge decks, blast resistant wall systems, post-tensioned FRP beams, and walls, as well as structural health monitoring of FRP structures, innovative methods for strengthening infrastructure using FRP materials, challenges in design and field applications of FRP strengthening systems, strengthening of concrete structures using near surface mounted FRP, reliability analysis of FRP systems, and the use of FRP to improve seismic performance or resilience of infrastructure in multi-hazard zones. Papers also addressing specific field applications with important challenges are welcome. We hope this Special Issue will bring recognition and realization to both the scientific and engineering communities and authorities on the role that FRP can play in developing sustainable and resilient infrastructures.

Prof. Dr. Mahmoud Reda Taha
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • fiber reinforced polymers (FRP)
  • infrastructure applications
  • FRP strengthening
  • corrosion-free structures
  • lightweight reinforcement

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
FRP for Infrastructure Applications: Research Advances
Fibers 2018, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6010001 - 21 Dec 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2963
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)

Research

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Article
Effect of the Fiber Type and Axial Stiffness of FRCM on the Flexural Strengthening of RC Beams
Fibers 2017, 5(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5010002 - 06 Jan 2017
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 5127
Abstract
The use of externally-bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets has been successfully used in the repair and strengthening of both the shear and flexural capacities of reinforced concrete (RC) beams, slabs and columns since the 1990s. However, the externally-bonded FRP reinforcements still present many [...] Read more.
The use of externally-bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets has been successfully used in the repair and strengthening of both the shear and flexural capacities of reinforced concrete (RC) beams, slabs and columns since the 1990s. However, the externally-bonded FRP reinforcements still present many disadvantages, such as poor performance in elevated temperature and fire, lack of permeability and strength degradation when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. To remedy such drawbacks, the fiber-/fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) has been recently introduced. The FRCM system consists of a fiber mesh or grid embedded in a cementitious bonding material. The present research investigates the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with FRCM. The experimental testing included eight large-scale concrete beams, 150 mm × 250 mm × 2400 mm, internally reinforced with steel bars and strengthened in flexure with FRCM. The investigated parameters were the internal steel reinforcement ratio and the FRCM systems. Two steel reinforcement ratios of 0.18 and 0.36 of the balanced reinforcement ratio, as well as three FRCM systems using glass, carbon and PBO fibers were investigated. Test results are presented in terms of load-deflection, load-strain and load-crack width relationships. The test results indicated that the PBO FRCM significantly increased the ultimate capacity of the strengthened RC beams with both low and moderate internal reinforcement ratios compared to the glass and carbon FRCM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Performance of Hybrid Reinforced Concrete Beam Column Joint: A Critical Review
Fibers 2016, 4(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib4020013 - 12 Apr 2016
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 6072
Abstract
Large residual strain in reinforced concrete structures after a seismic event is a major concern for structural safety and serviceability. Alternative reinforcement materials like fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) have been widely used to mitigate corrosion problems associated with steel. Low modulus of elasticity and [...] Read more.
Large residual strain in reinforced concrete structures after a seismic event is a major concern for structural safety and serviceability. Alternative reinforcement materials like fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) have been widely used to mitigate corrosion problems associated with steel. Low modulus of elasticity and brittle behavior compared to steel has made the use of FRP unsuitable in seismic resistant strictures. A combination of steel-FRP reinforcement configuration can address the problem of corrosion. Therefore, introducing a material that shows strong post elastic behavior without any decay due to corrosion is in demand. Shape memory alloy (SMA), a novel material, is highly corrosion resistive and shows super elastic property. Coupling SMA with FRP or steel in the plastic hinge region allows the structure to undergo large deformations, but regains its original shape upon unloading. In this study, the performance characteristics of four previously tested beam-column joints reinforced with different configurations (steel, SMA/steel, glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and SMA/FRP) are compared to assess their capacity to endure extreme loading. Experimental results are scrutinized to compare the behavior of these specimens in terms of load-story drift and energy dissipation capacity. SMA/FRP and SMA/Steel couples have been found to be an acceptable approach to reduce residual deformation in beam-column joints with adequate energy dissipation capacity. However, SMA/FRP is superior to SMA/Steel concerning to the corrosion issue in steel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Combined Transverse Steel-External FRP Confinement Model for Rectangular Reinforced Concrete Columns
Fibers 2016, 4(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib4010008 - 06 Feb 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4510
Abstract
Recently, the need to increase the strength of reinforced concrete members has become a subject that civil engineers are interested in tackling. Of the many proposed solutions, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have attracted attention due to their superior properties, such as high strength-to-weight [...] Read more.
Recently, the need to increase the strength of reinforced concrete members has become a subject that civil engineers are interested in tackling. Of the many proposed solutions, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have attracted attention due to their superior properties, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high energy absorption and excellent corrosion resistance. FRP wrapping of concrete columns is done to enhance the ultimate strength due to the confinement effect, which is normally induced by steel ties. The existence of the two confinement systems changes the nature of the problem, thus necessitating specialized nonlinear analysis to obtain the column’s ultimate capacity. Existing research focused on a single confinement system. Furthermore, very limited research on rectangular sections was found in the literature. In this work, a model to estimate the combined behavior of the two systems in rectangular columns is proposed. The calculation of the effective lateral pressure is based on the Lam and Teng model and the Mander model for FRP wraps and steel ties, respectively. The model then generates stress-strain diagrams for both the concrete core and the cover. The model was developed for the analysis in extreme load events, where all possible contributions to the column’s ultimate capacity should be accounted for without any margin of safety. The model was validated against experiments, and the results obtained showed good agreement with almost all of the available experimental data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica
Fibers 2016, 4(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib4010006 - 02 Feb 2016
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4528
Abstract
Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior [...] Read more.
Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the mechanical and durability properties of cement-based systems. Thus, there has been a growing interest in the use of nano-modified fiber-reinforced cementitious composites/mortars (NFRM) in repair and rehabilitation applications of concrete structures. The current study investigates various mechanical and durability properties of nano-modified mortar containing different types of fibers (steel, basalt, and hybrid (basalt and polypropylene)), in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, toughness, drying shrinkage, penetrability, and resistance to salt-frost scaling. The results highlight the overall effectiveness of the NFRM owing to the synergistic effects of nano-silica and fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Experiment-Based Sensitivity Analysis of Scaled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Elastomeric Isolators in Bonded Applications
Fibers 2016, 4(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib4010004 - 27 Jan 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4427
Abstract
Fiber-reinforced elastomeric isolators (FREIs) are a new type of elastomeric base isolation systems. Producing FREIs in the form of long laminated pads and cutting them to the required size significantly reduces the time and cost of the manufacturing process. Due to the lack [...] Read more.
Fiber-reinforced elastomeric isolators (FREIs) are a new type of elastomeric base isolation systems. Producing FREIs in the form of long laminated pads and cutting them to the required size significantly reduces the time and cost of the manufacturing process. Due to the lack of adequate information on the performance of FREIs in bonded applications, the goal of this study is to assess the performance sensitivity of 1/4-scale carbon-FREIs based on the experimental tests. The scaled carbon-FREIs are manufactured using a fast cold-vulcanization process. The effect of several factors including the vertical pressure, the lateral cyclic rate, the number of rubber layers, and the thickness of carbon fiber-reinforced layers are explored on the cyclic behavior of rubber bearings. Results show that the effect of vertical pressure on the lateral response of base isolators is negligible. However, decreasing the cyclic loading rate increases the lateral flexibility and the damping capacity. Additionally, carbon fiber-reinforced layers can be considered as a minor source of energy dissipation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
The Influence of CFRP Anchorage on Achieving Sectional Flexural Capacity of Strengthened Concrete Beams
Fibers 2015, 3(4), 539-559; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3040539 - 14 Dec 2015
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4159
Abstract
This research program is intended to verify the influence of using distributed external U-wrap CFRP anchorage to shift the failure mode from overall debonding to sectional flexural failure for concrete beams externally bonded with CFRP sheets. Premature cover delamination and FRP debonding are [...] Read more.
This research program is intended to verify the influence of using distributed external U-wrap CFRP anchorage to shift the failure mode from overall debonding to sectional flexural failure for concrete beams externally bonded with CFRP sheets. Premature cover delamination and FRP debonding are predominant failure modes in FRP flexural strengthening that may be delayed or prevented by using FRP anchorage. The present experimental study aims to comparatively prove that proper anchorage of flexural strengthening is anticipated to yield a classical flexural failure by FRP rupture or concrete crushing. Once the cohesion of concrete and/or the adhesion with the FRP is exhausted, the U-wraps are engaged to provide anchorage to the flexural FRP through shear friction. Accordingly, three identical T beams and three identical rectangular beams were designed and constructed to examine the capacity improvement by preventing premature debonding failure. The first specimen in each series was tested as a control beam. The second specimen in each series was strengthened using five layers of flexural CFRP in order to admit a debonding failure. The third specimen in each series was strengthened with the same five layers of flexural CFRP plus additional transverse CFRP U-wraps. This study proved that it is possible to quantify the higher flexural capacity of CFRP strengthened beams using external anchorage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Improving the Reinforcement of Polyolefin Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Infrastructure Applications
Fibers 2015, 3(4), 504-522; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3040504 - 26 Nov 2015
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4805
Abstract
The increase in the use of polyolefin fiber-reinforced concrete (PFRC) is in contrast to the limited amount of published research about its fracture behavior. This study assesses the main mechanical and fracture properties of PFRC by using conventional and self-compacting concrete with various [...] Read more.
The increase in the use of polyolefin fiber-reinforced concrete (PFRC) is in contrast to the limited amount of published research about its fracture behavior. This study assesses the main mechanical and fracture properties of PFRC by using conventional and self-compacting concrete with various dosages. The results highlight the significant performance of PFRC and revealed that improving its residual strength for small deformations would enhance its use for structural purposes. For that matter, a combination of polyolefin and steel-hooked fibers was used, improving the results and showing synergies between the two types of fibers that could be exploited for infrastructure applications. The significance of this research is, in addition to the characterization of PFRC, the optimum selection and definition of the proportions and characteristics of the types of fibers chosen for the combination. The results proved that, by combining hooked-steel fibers and macro-polyolefin fibers, it is possible to preserve the high-performance fresh properties and obtain a reliable behavior with synergies in the fracture results. The latter provides an efficient use of the materials, as well as a better mechanical behavior in both service and failure states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Concrete-Filled-Large Deformable FRP Tubular Columns under Axial Compressive Loading
Fibers 2015, 3(4), 432-449; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3040432 - 14 Oct 2015
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 4414
Abstract
The behavior of concrete-filled fiber tubes (CFFT) polymers under axial compressive loading was investigated. Unlike the traditional fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) such as carbon, glass, aramid, etc., the FRP tubes in this study were designed using large rupture strains FRP which are [...] Read more.
The behavior of concrete-filled fiber tubes (CFFT) polymers under axial compressive loading was investigated. Unlike the traditional fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) such as carbon, glass, aramid, etc., the FRP tubes in this study were designed using large rupture strains FRP which are made of recycled materials such as plastic bottles; hence, large rupture strain (LRS) FRP composites are environmentally friendly and can be used in the context of green construction. This study performed finite element (FE) analysis using LS-DYNA software to conduct an extensive parametric study on CFFT. The effects of the FRP confinement ratio, the unconfined concrete compressive strength ( ), column size, and column aspect ratio on the behavior of the CFFT under axial compressive loading were investigated during this study. A comparison between the behavior of the CFFTs with LRS-FRP and those with traditional FRP (carbon and glass) with a high range of confinement ratios was conducted as well. A new hybrid FRP system combined with traditional and LRS-FRP is proposed. Generally, the CFFTs with LRS-FRP showed remarkable behavior under axial loading in strength and ultimate strain. Equations to estimate the concrete dilation parameter and dilation angle of the CFFTs with LRS-FRP tubes and hybrid FRP tubes are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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Article
Finite Element Modeling of GFRP-Reinforced Concrete Interior Slab-Column Connections Subjected to Moment Transfer
Fibers 2015, 3(4), 411-431; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3040411 - 12 Oct 2015
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 6426
Abstract
A finite element model (FEM) was constructed using specialized three-dimensional (3D) software to investigate the punching shear behavior of interior slab-column connections subjected to a moment-to-shear ratio of 0.15 m. The FEM was then verified against the experimental results of full-scale interior slab-column [...] Read more.
A finite element model (FEM) was constructed using specialized three-dimensional (3D) software to investigate the punching shear behavior of interior slab-column connections subjected to a moment-to-shear ratio of 0.15 m. The FEM was then verified against the experimental results of full-scale interior slab-column connections reinforced with glass fiber reinforcement polymer (GFRP) bars previously tested by the authors. The FEM results showed that the constructed model was able to predict the behavior of the slabs with reasonable accuracy. Afterward, the verified model was used to conduct a parametric study to investigate the effects of reinforcement ratio, perimeter-to-depth ratio, and column aspect ratio on the punching shear behavior of such connections. The test results showed that increasing the tested parameters enhanced the overall behavior of the connections in terms of decreasing deflections and reinforcement strain and increasing the ultimate capacity. In addition, the obtained punching shear stresses of the connections were compared to the predictions of the Canadian standard and the American guideline for FRP-reinforced concrete structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) for Infrastructure Applications)
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