Nutritional Significance of Fermented Foods

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 7423

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Galenic Pharmacy and Food Technology, Universitad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: bioactive compound extraction; metabolic syndrome; bioactive polysaccharides; phenolic compounds; biological rhythms; mushrooms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Forest Resources, Agrifood Research and Technology Centre of Aragon (CITA), Agrifood Institute of Aragón-IA2 (CITA-Zaragoza University), Av. Montañana, 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: bioactive chemical components; olfactometry; aroma compounds; aroma analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term ‘fermented foods’ is used to describe those foods or beverages produced by the controlled growth of different microorganisms and the enzymatic conversion of food components. Fermentation processes have been traditionally used to obtain products with attractive organoleptic properties (taste, aroma, texture, etc.) but also to reduce the risk of contamination with pathogenic species. In this respect, a wide range of edible materials have been subjected to these methods, e.g., plants (fruits, cereals, and leaves), meat, fish, dairy products, mushrooms, etc., leading to a great diversity of fermented foodstuffs, such as kombucha, kefir, sourdough, kimchi, miso, tempeh, natto, and sauerkraut (not considering beers, wines, and other alcoholic beverages). As previously mentioned, specific modifications take place during the different stages, and the consequences of the altered composition may have significant effects on the nutritional and/or bioactive properties.

The aim of this Special Issue is to investigate the latest findings and insights related to the nutritional significance of fermented foods, the clinical impact of the generated metabolites, and the bioactive potential of the final products. Future challenges and perspectives must also be addressed.

Dr. Diego Morales
Dr. Eva Tejedor-Calvo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2100 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermented beverages
  • fermented foods
  • kombucha
  • kefir
  • sourdough
  • kimchi
  • sauerkraut
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • yeasts
  • bioactive compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1663 KiB  
Article
Alternative Development and Processing of Fermented Beverage and Tempeh Using Green Beans from Four Genotypes of Lupinus mutabilis
by Giovana Parra-Gallardo, Klever Quimbiulco-Sánchez, María del Carmen Salas-Sanjuán, Fernando del Moral and Juan Luis Valenzuela
Fermentation 2023, 9(7), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9070590 - 25 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1179
Abstract
In this study, the nutritional characteristics of two formulations were studied: A fermented beverage and tempeh. Green seeds from four different cultivars of tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis) were used: Andino, Guaranguito, Ecuadorian, and Peruvian. The seeds were first debittered, and then, they [...] Read more.
In this study, the nutritional characteristics of two formulations were studied: A fermented beverage and tempeh. Green seeds from four different cultivars of tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis) were used: Andino, Guaranguito, Ecuadorian, and Peruvian. The seeds were first debittered, and then, they were fermented, using two inoculum doses and two fermentation times. For the fermented beverage, Saccaromyces cerevisae was used at doses of 1.5 and 2.5% dry weight and fermentation times of 72 and 96 h. For the tempeh, the inoculum used was the Rhizopus oligosporus strain NRRL 2710 at doses of 0.015 and 0.025% dry weight and fermentation times of 48 and 72 h. The alcoholic strength, total solid soluble, and pH in the fermented beverage were analyzed, while proximal analysis was performed for both the fermented beverage and tempeh. The results indicate that, in all cases, the Andino cultivar produced a beverage with higher alcoholic strength, regardless of the inoculum concentration and fermentation time. In both the fermented beverage and tempeh, a varietal effect was found for protein and crude fiber. The Andino cultivar had the highest protein, fat, and fiber content. The alkaloid content was similar in the beverage and tempeh, but the effect of fermentation was markedly increased with the higher inoculum dose and longer fermentation time. The alkaloid content was highest in the Peruvian cultivar, while it was similar in the remaining three cultivars. Tarwi grains have a high nutritional value, but the grain is traditionally used dry. In this study, we used green grain, which contains lower alkaloid content. Moreover, the crop cycle is shortened, and it can be used in the manufacture of fermented drinks and tempeh. In this way, we show that it is valid to use green grain instead of dried grain, constituting an improvement in the traditional use of lupine grain, and our study shows that it is possible to make both fermented drink and tempeh with green grain, showing the influence of the genotype and dosage starter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Significance of Fermented Foods)
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14 pages, 2605 KiB  
Article
Chemical and Aromatic Changes during Fermentation of Kombucha Beverages Produced Using Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo) Fruits
by Eva Tejedor-Calvo and Diego Morales
Fermentation 2023, 9(4), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9040326 - 25 Mar 2023
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3558
Abstract
The use of alternative ingredients in the production of kombucha has seen a recent increase. Our research aimed to characterize the chemical, nutritional, microbial, and aromatic profiles of kombucha beverages prepared with strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) fruits fermented with three different [...] Read more.
The use of alternative ingredients in the production of kombucha has seen a recent increase. Our research aimed to characterize the chemical, nutritional, microbial, and aromatic profiles of kombucha beverages prepared with strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) fruits fermented with three different SCOBYs for 21 days. The analyses showed similar levels of microbiological groups (aerobic mesophilic microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, and yeasts)among the SCOBYs used. The beverages studied displayed a decrease in pH value and carbohydrate content, and protein degradation was also observed as fermentation progressed. However, the increase in total phenolic compounds during the first week proved to be a point of interest. A total of 20 volatile organic compounds were detected, giving different sensory qualities to the beverages: higher ethanol, benzaldehyde-4-ethyl, or acetic acid depending on the SCOBY used. The results obtained indicated that strawberry tree kombucha might be an alternative beverage with notable nutritional and aromatic properties, with fermentation time and SCOBY composition being identified as crucial factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Significance of Fermented Foods)
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22 pages, 1581 KiB  
Article
Characterisation of Lacto-Fermented Cricket (Acheta domesticus) Flour and Its Influence on the Quality Parameters and Acrylamide Formation in Wheat Biscuits
by Elena Bartkiene, Egle Zokaityte, Evaldas Kentra, Vytaute Starkute, Dovile Klupsaite, Ernestas Mockus, Gintare Zokaityte, Darius Cernauskas, João Miguel Rocha and Raquel P. F. Guiné
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020153 - 3 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2034
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different amounts (40, 80 and 100 g) of non-fermented and fermented (with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum No. 122 and Lacticaseibacillus casei No. 210) cricket flour (Cr) on the quality characteristics and acrylamide formation in [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different amounts (40, 80 and 100 g) of non-fermented and fermented (with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum No. 122 and Lacticaseibacillus casei No. 210) cricket flour (Cr) on the quality characteristics and acrylamide formation in wheat biscuits (WB). The main formula for WB preparation consisted of 280 g of wheat flour, 100 g of margarine, 50 g of saccharose, 3 g of vanilla sugar, 50 g of eggs, 1.5 g of salt and 2.0 g of baking powder. It was established that the highest lactic acid bacteria (LAB) number was achieved in 48 h with No. 122 fermented Cr (11.8 log10 CFU/g) and the lowest pH (4.34) was obtained after 48 h of Cr fermentation with both the tested LAB strains. The total colour differences were in the range of 17.54 to 22.08 and, in every case, fermented samples were clearly distinguished from untreated ones. Fermentation increased tyramine content in Cr (from 13.0 to 29.2 times). The main FAs in Cr were palmitic acid, stearic acid, octadec-9-enoic acid and linoleic acid. The lowest acrylamide content (84.1 µg/kg) was found in WB with 40 g of Cr fermented with No. 210. Significant differences in WB overall acceptability were not found. However, the highest intensity of emotion “happy” was elicited by WB with 80 g of Cr fermented with No. 122. Due to the demonstrated decrease of acrylamide content, fermented Cr can be considered a beneficial ingredient for the manufacture of WB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Significance of Fermented Foods)
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