A Commemorative Issue in Honor of the 30th Anniversary of the Epigenetics Society

A special issue of Epigenomes (ISSN 2075-4655).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1604

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: cell culture; gene expression; DNA sequencing; genomics; gene regulation; next generation sequencing; epigenetics; regulation of gene expression; transcription; transcriptional regulation; DNA methylation; gene expression and chromatin biology; chromatin; methylation; histone modification; epigenomics; ChIP-sequencing; chromatin remodeling; chromatin structure; chromatin biology; embryonic stem cell culture and differentiation; enhancer regulation
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Guest Editor
Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
Interests: diabetes; clinical and molecular epigenetics; chromatin; DNA and RNA methylation; histones; transcriptional regulation; computational epigenomics; metabolic disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Roma, Italy
Interests: DNA methylation; epigenetics; nutrition; methylation metabolism; environmental epigenetics; neuroepigenetics; gene expression and chromatin biology; bisulfite sequencing; real-time PCR; Alzheimer’s disease; aging research; beta amyloid; neuroscience; neurobiology; neurodegenerative diseases; neurophysiology; neurodegeneration; neurobiology and brain physiology; animal models; cell culture; neurobiochemistry; methylation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Epigenetics Society (ES) was originally founded as the DNA Methylation Society (DMS) in March 1994. One of the reasons for establishing the ES was the reluctance of many molecular biologists to recognize the major importance of DNA methylation for the regulation of normal and pathological gene expression. In 2006, as the larger field of epigenetics was growing exponentially, we renamed DMS to the Epigenetics Society.

In 2023, the ES updated its website and organized the 1st ES International Meeting in Rome. More than 200 attendees from over 20 countries all over the world attended the meeting at which there were talks and posters presenting results related to the major aspects of epigenetics. Although the epigenetics (and DNA methylation) literature is still undergoing exponential growth, there is not enough awareness among biologists and the medical profession of the importance of epigenetics for health and the biosphere. The mission of the ES continues to be encouraging epigenetics researchers, facilitating interactions between them and helping educate the lay public and scientists in general about the importance of epigenetics.

We invite the epigenetics research community to submit Research or Review manuscripts for this ES 30th Anniversary Special Issue of Epigenomes, an open access journal. We welcome submissions from established members of the ES, recently joined members (https://epigeneticssocietyint.com/) and attendees at the Rome ES meeting.  This Special Issue aims to gather high-quality research manuscripts on any aspect of epigenetic research. This includes basic, applied and translational research. Potential topics are DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, histone modifications, higher-order chromatin structure, non-coding RNAs, epigenetics of development, epigenetics of cancer and other diseases, epigenetics of aging, plant and invertebrate epigenetics, environmental epigenetics, novel epigenetic technologies, the biochemical and molecular basis of epigenetics, and readers and writers of epigenetics. 

Dr. Humaira Gowher
Prof. Dr. Assam El-Osta
Dr. Andrea Fuso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Epigenomes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epigenetics
  • DNA methylation
  • histone modifications
  • chromatin remodeling
  • ncRNAs
  • chromatin architecture
  • insulators
  • enhancers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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18 pages, 2094 KiB  
Review
Epigenetic Regulation of Mammalian Cardiomyocyte Development
by Isaiah K. Mensah and Humaira Gowher
Epigenomes 2024, 8(3), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/epigenomes8030025 - 29 Jun 2024
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Abstract
The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development and functions to distribute nutrients and oxygen to other parts of the developing embryo. Cardiomyocytes are the major cell types of the heart and provide both structural support and contractile function to the [...] Read more.
The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development and functions to distribute nutrients and oxygen to other parts of the developing embryo. Cardiomyocytes are the major cell types of the heart and provide both structural support and contractile function to the heart. The successful differentiation of cardiomyocytes during early development is under tight regulation by physical and molecular factors. We have reviewed current studies on epigenetic factors critical for cardiomyocyte differentiation, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodelers, and noncoding RNAs. This review also provides comprehensive details on structural and morphological changes associated with the differentiation of fetal and postnatal cardiomyocytes and highlights their differences. A holistic understanding of all aspects of cardiomyocyte development is critical for the successful in vitro differentiation of cardiomyocytes for therapeutic purposes. Full article
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9 pages, 2649 KiB  
Opinion
Keep Fingers on the CpG Islands
by Xing Zhang, Robert M. Blumenthal and Xiaodong Cheng
Epigenomes 2024, 8(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/epigenomes8020023 - 19 Jun 2024
Viewed by 769
Abstract
The post-genomic era has ushered in the extensive application of epigenetic editing tools, allowing for precise alterations of gene expression. The use of reprogrammable editors that carry transcriptional corepressors has significant potential for long-term epigenetic silencing for the treatment of human diseases. The [...] Read more.
The post-genomic era has ushered in the extensive application of epigenetic editing tools, allowing for precise alterations of gene expression. The use of reprogrammable editors that carry transcriptional corepressors has significant potential for long-term epigenetic silencing for the treatment of human diseases. The ideal scenario involves precise targeting of a specific genomic location by a DNA-binding domain, ensuring there are no off-target effects and that the process yields no genetic remnants aside from specific epigenetic modifications (i.e., DNA methylation). A notable example is a recent study on the mouse Pcsk9 gene, crucial for cholesterol regulation and expressed in hepatocytes, which identified synthetic zinc-finger (ZF) proteins as the most effective DNA-binding editors for silencing Pcsk9 efficiently, specifically, and persistently. This discussion focuses on enhancing the specificity of ZF-array DNA binding by optimizing interactions between specific amino acids and DNA bases across three promoters containing CpG islands. Full article
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