Special Issue "New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Claudia Cosio
Website
Guest Editor
Chaire écotoxicologie Aquasurv
Université Reims Champagne Ardenne, Reims, France
Interests: Water Quality; Environmental Analysis; Environmental Microbiology; Environmental Toxicology; Aquatic Pollution; Bioaccumulation; Sediment Pollution; Mercury
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Elise David
Website
Guest Editor
Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France
Interests: ecotoxicology; energy; molecular responses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Toxic metals remain an important threat to aquatic ecosystems, despite regulatory efforts to reduce their release. Several historical toxic metals already appear in the list of priority substances of environmental issue, while concerns arise from the increasing use of technology-critical metals, such as metallic nanoparticles, and rare-earth and platinum group metals. In aquatic environments, various chemical, biological, and physical processes determine metal concentration, speciation, reactivity, and impact on the biota. This Special Issue invites critical reviews and research papers providing innovative insights into toxic metal impacts in freshwater and marine environments.

The specific emphasis is on novel approaches and models addressing (i) the cellular and molecular impacts as investigated using one or several omics approach; (ii) trophic transfer and impact along food chains; (iii) ecological effects at population and community levels; and (iv) the combined action of toxic metals and the changing climate. We are particularly interested in contributions concerning various aspects of the ecotoxicology of toxic metals in mixtures or at different levels of biological organization.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Cosio
Dr. Elise Elise David
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adverse outcome pathways
  • bioavailability and biouptake
  • environmental risk assessment
  • metals and changing environment
  • metal mixtures
  • molecular and cellular toxicity
  • toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic approaches

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Acute Toxicity of Sodium Chloride, Nitrates, Ortho-Phosphates, Cadmium, Arsenic and Aluminum for Juveniles of the Freshwater Pearl Mussel: Margaritifera Margaritifera (L.1758)
Environments 2020, 7(6), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7060048 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
The freshwater pearl mussel (FWPM) Margaritifera margaritifera (L.1758) is critically endangered in Europe and ecotoxicological studies on the species are scares. Here, 96 h acute toxicity tests were conducted at 16 °C with sodium chloride (NaCl), nitrates (NO3), ortho-phosphates (PO [...] Read more.
The freshwater pearl mussel (FWPM) Margaritifera margaritifera (L.1758) is critically endangered in Europe and ecotoxicological studies on the species are scares. Here, 96 h acute toxicity tests were conducted at 16 °C with sodium chloride (NaCl), nitrates (NO3), ortho-phosphates (PO43−), cadmium (Cd), aluminum (Al) and arsenic (As) on 13- to 28-month-old post-parasitic juveniles. The experimental protocol was developed according to conditions described in a standard guide and was modified in order to assess toxicity thresholds for the Dronne River. Results showed that juveniles were tolerant to concentrations of Al, Cd, As, PO43−, NO3 and NaCl, largely higher than those found in the Dronne river, since 96 h EC50s (effective concentrations) were >954 µg/L for Al; >110 µg/L for Cd; >127 µg/L for As; >5.01 mg/L for PO43−; between 1000 and 1500 mg/L for NO3 and were 1.19 and 1.33 g/L for NaCl. Moreover, the use of a substrate in experiments was found not to affect juvenile responses and younger juveniles seemed more sensitive than older individuals. This study thus provides new data about the tolerance of FWPM to environmental pollution and suggests that pollutant concentrations in the river are significantly lower than levels affecting them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect Thresholds of Metals in Stream Sediments Based on In Situ Oligochaete Communities
Environments 2020, 7(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7040031 - 13 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aquatic oligochaetes, comprising a large number of species showing various degrees of resistance to chemical pollution, are recognized as valuable bioindicators of sediments’ quality. In the Geneva area (Switzerland), oligochaete tools were previously tested for assessing the biological quality of stream sediments, and [...] Read more.
Aquatic oligochaetes, comprising a large number of species showing various degrees of resistance to chemical pollution, are recognized as valuable bioindicators of sediments’ quality. In the Geneva area (Switzerland), oligochaete tools were previously tested for assessing the biological quality of stream sediments, and effect thresholds of combined metals (quotients) in sediments were defined. The aims of the present study were to update this previous work with new data acquired in different cantons of Switzerland and to establish effect thresholds on oligochaete communities for individual metals and for combined metals. The oligochaete metrics “Oligochaete index of sediment bioindication (IOBS)”, “oligochaete density” and “percentage of tubificids without hair setae” proved pertinent for assessing the effects of metals and organic matter in sediments. We established a threshold effect level (TELoligo) and probable effect level (PELoligo) for eight metals in sediments (Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) as well as a probable effect level for these metals combined (mPELoligo-Q). These thresholds could be used directly to screen for alteration of in situ communities restricted to sediments and/or for establishing sediment quality standards based on a combination of different biological and ecotoxicological tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Zirconium on Freshwater Periphytic Microorganisms
Environments 2019, 6(10), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6100111 - 01 Oct 2019
Abstract
The majority of studies on biofilms have focused on autotrophic and bacterial taxa, without considering the potential effects on biofilm grazers. In this work, we investigated the effects of realistic environmental concentrations of zirconium (Zr) on periphyton algal growth and micromeiofauna biodiversity. Glass [...] Read more.
The majority of studies on biofilms have focused on autotrophic and bacterial taxa, without considering the potential effects on biofilm grazers. In this work, we investigated the effects of realistic environmental concentrations of zirconium (Zr) on periphyton algal growth and micromeiofauna biodiversity. Glass slides were submerged in a pond for four weeks to colonize biofilms and exposed for four weeks in aquaria to targeted Zr concentrations of 0, 1, and 10 nM, which were monitored over time (average measured concentrations were 0.2 ± 0.1, 0.5 ± 0.3, and 2.9 ± 0.3 nM Zr). The four-week exposure to the highest concentration (3 nM) affected the micromeiofauna structure of biofilms and modified the autotrophic biofilm structure by increasing the proportion of green algae and decreasing the abundance of cyanobacteria and brown algae. Rotifers and the ciliate Aspidisca cicada appeared to be the most sensitive organisms among the observed micromeiofauna. A toxic effect of Zr on rotifers could explain such results. Indirect effects, such as reduced food availability given the reduced algal growth in the presence of Zr, could also play a role in the changes of micromeiofauna community structure. These results are among the few published data on the effects of Zr. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
New Insights into Cellular Impacts of Metals in Aquatic Animals
Environments 2020, 7(6), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7060046 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
Toxic metals remain a current important threat to aquatic ecosystems, despite regulatory efforts to reduce their release. Several toxic metals already appear in the list of priority substances polluting surface waters, while concerns arise from the increasing use of technology-critical metals such as [...] Read more.
Toxic metals remain a current important threat to aquatic ecosystems, despite regulatory efforts to reduce their release. Several toxic metals already appear in the list of priority substances polluting surface waters, while concerns arise from the increasing use of technology-critical metals such as metallic nanoparticles, rare-earth, and platinum group metals. In aquatic environments, various chemical, biological and physical processes determine the impact of metals on the biota. This review provides insights into responses to toxic metals recently reported in freshwater and marine animals. The specific emphasis is on: (i) common cellular and molecular responses; (ii) stress proteins; (iii) redox homeostasis; (iv) cytoskeleton rearrangement; (v) metabolism reshuffle; (vi) free cellular energy and mitochondrial metabolism; and (vi) immunity. These endpoints are promising, notably in multi-biomarker approaches to identify precise cellular toxicity pathways and anticipate the impact of environmental metal pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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Open AccessReview
Effects of Mixtures of Engineered Nanoparticles and Metallic Pollutants on Aquatic Organisms
Environments 2020, 7(4), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7040027 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In aquatic environment, engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are present as complex mixtures with other pollutants, such as trace metals, which could result in synergism, additivity or antagonism of their combined effects. Despite the fact that the toxicity and environmental risk of the ENPs have [...] Read more.
In aquatic environment, engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are present as complex mixtures with other pollutants, such as trace metals, which could result in synergism, additivity or antagonism of their combined effects. Despite the fact that the toxicity and environmental risk of the ENPs have received extensive attention in the recent years, the interactions of ENPs with other pollutants and the consequent effects on aquatic organisms represent an important challenge in (nano)ecotoxicology. The present review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art and critically discusses the existing knowledge on combined effects of mixtures of ENPs and metallic pollutants on aquatic organisms. The specific emphasis is on the adsorption of metallic pollutants on metal-containing ENPs, transformation and bioavailability of ENPs and metallic pollutants in mixtures. Antagonistic, additive and synergistic effects observed in aquatic organisms co-exposed to ENPs and metallic pollutants are discussed in the case of “particle-proof” and “particle-ingestive” organisms. This knowledge is important in developing efficient strategies for sound environmental impact assessment of mixture exposure in complex environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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Other

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Open AccessErratum
Erratum: Vivien, R.; Casado-Martínez, C.; Lafont, M.; Ferrari, B.J. Effect Thresholds of Metals in Stream Sediments Based on In Situ Oligochaete Communities. Environments 2020, 7, 31
Environments 2020, 7(7), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070050 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The authors would like to correct the published article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Impacts of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Environments)
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