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Energy in Modern Transportation – Problems, Challenges and Solutions for Changes in Transport Needs Caused by Remote and Virtual Activities

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "E: Electric Vehicles".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2022) | Viewed by 3665

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Faculty, Cracow University of Technology, 31-155 Kraków, Poland
Interests: transport system development; demand modelling; regional transport models; accessibility; mobility
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Economics University of Economics in Katowice, 40-287 Katowice, Poland
Interests: modeling of transport systems; intelligent transport system ITS; sustainable urban mobility planning; transport in smart cities; micro-mobility services
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Transport, College of Economics, University of Economics in Katowice, 40-287 Katowice, Poland
Interests: transport economics; models of public transport market; cost-benefit analysis of transport investments; sustainable urban mobility; strategic management of the development of transport systems; electromobility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Energies, “Energy in Modern Transportation – Problems, Challenges and Solutions for Changes in Transport Needs Caused by Remote and Virtual Activities”, will consist of manuscripts describing problems, challenges and solutions of energy in transport for changes in transport needs caused by remote and virtual activities.

Energy in transport systems plays an essential role in terms of the functioning, efficiency and ecology of transport systems and sustainable urban mobility. The wider context of these issues are transport systems, in which energy is an element of synergy in the functioning of all aspects of smart cities. The currently observed changes in socio-economic systems as a result of restrictions aimed at limiting the COVID-19 pandemic are focused, among others, on changes in socio-economic activity. Previously, a significant share of passenger transport systems in the conduct of work, shopping, services, entertainment and education activities has now decreased as a result of displacement constraints, as well as shifts towards remote and virtual activities. It is also related to the observed increase in traffic in freight transport, mainly in the supply of goods that are ordered and purchased remotely but must be delivered to the consumer—to the individual end recipient in the urbanized area, both in smart city centers as well as in suburbs and in rural areas. The presented changes are the cause of problems, challenges and new solutions in the organization and operation of transport systems and smart cities—those that optimize, balance and use energy in a Therefore, in order to exchange theoretical and practical knowledge related to these issues, the Special Issue of Energies " Energy in Modern Transportation – Problems, Challenges and Solutions for Changes in Transport Needs Caused by Remote and Virtual Activities " was launched. We invite all theoretician scientists and practitioners to submit their articles in order to share their knowledge in this area on the pages of this Special Issue of Energies. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, models and methods:

  • conventional, hybrid and electric drive systems
  • transport infrastructure as a power supply for transport systems
  • human drive vehicles, autonomous vehicles, connected vehicles
  • various communication environment and innovative new mobility service
  • energy networks in smart cities
  • demand responsive transport and demand responsive service
  • deep learning, machine learning, artificial intelligence in transportation systems and applications

Manuscripts that emphasize either method development or applications are encouraged. Both original papers and review articles are welcome; authors interested in submitting a review article are encouraged to contact the editor in advance to discuss the scope.

Prof. Dr. Grzegorz Karoń
Prof. Dr. Andrzej Szarata
Dr. Ryszard Janecki
Dr. Grzegorz Krawczyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 3643 KiB  
Article
Multi-Criteria Analysis in the Decision-Making Process on the Electrification of Public Transport in Cities in Poland: A Case Study Analysis
by Marcin Wołek, Aleksander Jagiełło and Michał Wolański
Energies 2021, 14(19), 6391; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14196391 - 06 Oct 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
Electromobility is one of the leading trends transforming public transport worldwide. Supported by international organizations, such as the European Union, and national cofounding, public transport operators and local authorities are taking strategic decisions on the direction and scope of the electrification of rolling [...] Read more.
Electromobility is one of the leading trends transforming public transport worldwide. Supported by international organizations, such as the European Union, and national cofounding, public transport operators and local authorities are taking strategic decisions on the direction and scope of the electrification of rolling stock. Most of the electric buses that are being put into operation replace the previously used conventional buses, and consequently, most of the electric buses are operating on existing bus lines. By applying a strategic approach to selecting bus routes for electrification, the advantages of electric vehicles can be maximized. Based on a case study of the Polish city of Gdynia, this paper explores the usefulness of the multi-criteria analysis for selecting the bus lines for electrification. Multi-criteria analysis methods help decision makers to consider and weigh diverse criteria that include, among others, economic, social, technological and environmental aspects. To fulfil the above purpose, the paper compares different methods for evaluating electromobility options at an early stage. The primary research methods include multi-criteria analysis, literature review and case study analysis. An example of using multi-criteria analysis in the decision-making process of in-motion charging trolleybuses to replace diesel buses on particular lines is discussed and concluded. It is found that the multi-criteria analysis method could be used at an early but important stage of the operational level when particular lines to be replaced are being discussed. Moreover, the case is made that the local context should always be considered, including features of the existing public transport systems, and that cost–benefit analysis should be conducted for the selected optimum scenario. Full article
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