Special Issue "Materials to Store Energy"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Merce Segarra
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Physical Chemistry, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: thermal energy storage; phase change materials; renewable energies
Dr. Camila Barreneche
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Physical Chemistry, Universtat de Barcelona, Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: thermal energy storage materials; materials science; materials chemistry; materials characterization; energy efficiency; phase change materials; thermochemical materials; thermoregulator materials; renewable energies; low carbon materials; energy storage; nanomaterials; nanofluids; materials characterization; polymeric materials; rubber; calorimetric analyses; DSC; composites; nanocomposites; sustainable engineering; materials circularity; life cycle assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Alejandro Calderón

Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Physical Chemistry, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 - Barcelona
Interests: thermal energy storage; phase change materials; renewable energies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The total implementation of renewable energies in the current energy system mainly requires overcoming the problem of discontinuity of its production. To achieve this, it is necessary to improve the energy efficiency of these systems among other strategies but, above all, it is paramount that energy is stored whenever it is produced but not consumed. Here, the materials for storing energy play a very important role. Energy storage technologies are defined as key enabling technologies by the most important international agencies, such as the International Energy Agency or the International Renewable Energy Agency, among others. The scope of this Special Issue focuses on presenting an overview of the materials used in these energy storage technologies. The fields it addresses are thus related to the science, engineering and chemistry of the materials that are capable of storing energy in chemical, mechanical, electrical, or thermal forms. The development, synthesis, optimization, and characterization of these advanced materials for storing energy will be described in this Special Issue. The most relevant findings related to this topic will be welcome to contribute. In addition, the concepts of life cycle analysis and importance of these materials, as well as their recyclability, will be emphasized to give a general idea of how energy storage can contribute towards a circular economy.

Prof. Merce Segarra
Dr. Camila Barreneche
Dr. Alejandro Calderón
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy storage materials
  • materials and characterization
  • thermal energy storage
  • electrical storage
  • batteries
  • materials sustainability
  • circular economy
  • phase change materials
  • waste to store energy
  • upcycling
  • thermochemical materials

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
The Impact of Additives on the Main Properties of Phase Change Materials
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3064; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123064 - 13 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The main drawback of phase change materials (PCMs) is their low thermal conductivity, which limits the possibilities of a wide range of implementations. Therefore, the researchers, as found in the literature, proposed several methods to improve the thermal conductivity of PCMs, including inserting [...] Read more.
The main drawback of phase change materials (PCMs) is their low thermal conductivity, which limits the possibilities of a wide range of implementations. Therefore, the researchers, as found in the literature, proposed several methods to improve the thermal conductivity of PCMs, including inserting high thermal conductivity materials in nano-, micro-, and macro-scales, as well as encapsulation of PCMs. However, these inserts impact the other properties of PCMs like latent heat, melting temperature, thermal stability, and cycling stability. Hence, this paper aims to review the available in the open literature research on the main properties of enhanced PCMs that undergo solid–liquid transition. It is found that inserting high thermal conductivity materials and encapsulation results in improved thermal conductivity of PCMs, but it decreases their latent heat. Moreover, the insertions can act as nucleating agents, and the supercooling degree can be reduced. Some of the thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) may prevent PCMs from leakage. However, some test results are inconsistent and some seem to be questionable. Therefore, this review indicates these discrepancies and gaps in knowledge and points out possible directions for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials to Store Energy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop