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Environmental and Health Impacts of Renewable Energies

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 January 2023) | Viewed by 5900

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Building Services Engineering Department, Bd. December 21, no. 128-130, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: unconventional energies; environmental engineering; water engineering; clean energy technologies;

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, “Ştefan cel Mare” University of Suceava, 720229 Suceava, Romania
Interests: clean renewable energies; green hydrogen energy; eco-responsibility; green buildings; sustainable energy technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400020 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: digital/DSMM marketing; human–robot interaction; socio-ethical collaborative robotics; marketing analytics; social media strategy mix and social media measurement; stereotypical advertising polysemy; consumer behavior; ambient advertising; innovative experiential learning models in marketing and logistics/supply chain management; relational supply chain strategy relationships; project management

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Guest Editor
ICSI Energy Department, National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, 240050 Ramnicu Valcea, Romania
Interests: renewable resources; hydrogen energy; fuel cell technology; hybrid energy system; smart stand‐alone systems; electric vehicle charging station; blockchain technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the awareness that traditional fossil energy resources are limited, depletable and polluting, the idea of exploitation and widespread use of alternative energy generation resources has been implemented. Energy is the driving force of civilization and technical–scientific and economic evolution. With the identification of the current situation related to the limited availability of traditional energy resources, climate change and the negative influence of the energy sector on the environment and human health, a number of principles have been established underpinning sustainable development in this area. Thus, special emphasis is placed on the use of alternative and renewable energy sources, characterized by a positive impact on the environment and human health.

This Special Issue includes but is not limited to the following topics:

  • The role of renewable energy resources in environmental protection;
  • The role of renewable energy resources in human health protection;
  • Clean renewable energy and environmental impact;
  • Clean renewable energy and human health impact;
  • Climate change and human health in the context of transition to a clean energetics perspective;
  • Renewable energy sources, sustainability issues and climate change mitigation;
  • Safety, health, and environmental (SHE) issues of the solar energy system;
  • Safety, health, and environmental (SHE) issues of the wind turbine system;
  • Safety, health, and environmental (SHE) issues of hydrogen fuel cell technologies;
  • Safety, health, and environmental (SHE) issues of biomass and waste for energy;
  • Safety, health, and environmental (SHE) issues of other systems for generating clean energy;
  • Nuclear power—environmental and health impacts;
  • Community perceptions of green renewable energies;
  • Power generation and public health;
  • Structure and environmental impact of energy consumption;
  • Environmental costs of renewable energy;
  • Environmentalism and public policy;
  • Environmental justice.

Prof. Em. Univ. Dr. Eng. Gheorghe Badea
Dr. Eng. Raluca Andreea Felseghi
Dr. Eng. Ioan Aschilean
CSIII Maria Simona Raboaca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Behavior of energy consumption
  • Climate change
  • Energy transition
  • Environmental impact
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Health impact
  • Human health
  • Public health
  • Renewable energy
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 684 KiB  
Article
Carbon Footprint Stemming from Ice Sports on the Turkey and Lithuanian Scale
by Dalia Perkumienė, Ahmet Atalay and Biruta Švagždienė
Energies 2023, 16(3), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16031476 - 2 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1817
Abstract
The aim of this study is to calculate the average carbon footprint per capita from the transportation of the Ice Hockey League in Turkey and Lithuania in the 2021–2022 season. In addition, we identified the opinions of team managers of the national hockey [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to calculate the average carbon footprint per capita from the transportation of the Ice Hockey League in Turkey and Lithuania in the 2021–2022 season. In addition, we identified the opinions of team managers of the national hockey leagues in Turkey and Lithuania regarding the problems and possible solutions related to the sustainable environment and persons’ right to a clean and safe environment in the sport sector. In this study, which was limited to the Turkish Ice Hockey Intercity Super League and the Lithuanian National Ice Hockey League in the 2021–2022 Season, eight teams from Turkey and five teams from Lithuania took part in the research. The type of vehicle used by each team and the total traveled distance were used for the collection of data. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview format seeking to identify problems and solutions proposed by sports managers regarding environmental sustainability and the implementation of persons’ right to a clean and safe environment in the sport sector. Five managers from Turkey and two managers from Lithuania were randomly selected for the research. The average carbon footprint per person was calculated as 88.23 kg/CO2-e due to the travels of the Ice Hockey Super League teams participating in the 2021–2022 Season matches in Turkey. The average carbon footprint per capita was calculated as 0.5229 kg/CO2-e, as Ice Hockey Super League teams in the 2021–2022 Season traveled to participate in matches organized in Lithuania. For solving the above-mentioned problems, the sports experts offered recommendations such as energy saving, less waste generation and reducing water consumption in order to achieve the environmental protection goals of the sports leaders. Since both teams often travel due to the intense league schedules, the Ice Hockey Super League goal should be to reduce carbon emissions, especially those related to transportation. Energy conservation policies should also be implemented, and environmentally friendly practices should be emphasized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental and Health Impacts of Renewable Energies)
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10 pages, 3371 KiB  
Article
Health Risks Associated with Occupational Exposure to Biological Air Pollutants Occurring during the Processing of Biomass for Energy Purposes: A Case Study
by Ewa Brągoszewska and Maja Pawlak
Energies 2021, 14(8), 2086; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082086 - 9 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2121
Abstract
The main goal of this study was to assess the levels of concentration of biological air pollutants in biomass processing power plants, based on the measurements taken in a plant located in Southern Poland. This work shows problems related to the co-combustion of [...] Read more.
The main goal of this study was to assess the levels of concentration of biological air pollutants in biomass processing power plants, based on the measurements taken in a plant located in Southern Poland. This work shows problems related to the co-combustion of biomass and indicates the health risks to which employees of positions closely related to the processing and combustion of biomass are exposed. Bacterial and fungal aerosol samples were collected using a six-stage Andersen cascade impactor with aerodynamic cut-off diameters of 7.0, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1 and 0.65 µm (Tisch Environmental, USA). The highest average concentration level of micro-organisms was recorded in the air in the biomass analysis laboratory, where there was no constant airflow. It was found that the concentration levels of biological agents were below the Polish proposals for threshold limit values in the work environment polluted with organic dust. However, it was observed that the share of the respirable fraction (RF) of bacterial aerosol (particles less than 3.3 µm) in workplaces was equal to or higher than 50% of the total concentration, which may cause increased potentially adverse health effects and problems with concentration among power plant employees. Therefore, to ensure adequate air quality in the tested object, it is necessary to properly ventilate. This preliminary research could be the important starting point for a complete and precise assessment of bioaerosol exposures in biomass processing power plants in order to protect workers’ health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental and Health Impacts of Renewable Energies)
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