Special Issue "Solutions to Climate Emergency"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wen-Hsien Tsai
Website
Guest Editor
Distinguished Professor of Information & Accounting Systems, Department of Business Administration, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan
Interests: sustainability; green production decision model; Industry 4.0; corporate social responsibility (CSR); activity-based costing (ABC); enterprise resource planning (ERP); carbon emission cost; energy saving and carbon emission reduction; international financial reporting standards (IFRS)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due in part to the environmental protection problem having received considerable attention in recent decades, the United Nations has established regulations for reducing Green House Gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the changing regulations, from the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol to the 2015 Paris Agreement, is to ensure that our Earth not continue to deteriorate at the same speed. The Paris Agreement was signed by 195 nations in December 2015 to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change. According to Article 2 of the Paris Agreement, the increase in the global average temperature is anticipated to be held to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels, and efforts are being employed to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels.

Although countries around the world have made commitments to the Paris Agreement, the increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the global atmosphere was higher than the average annual increase in the past ten years. As a result, the Oxford Dictionary lists Climate Emergency as the Word of the Year 2019. Climate Emergency is defined as ‘a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid the potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it (https://t.co/JLepdcgt0U). The following are possible ways to solve the problem of Climate Emergency:

  • carbon tax;
  • carbon trading;
  • cap-and-trade;
  • carbon offset;
  • carbon pricing;
  • carbon footprint;
  • carbon labeling;
  • decarbonizing the economy;
  • carbon capture and storage;
  • carbon recycling;
  • eliminating pollutants;
  • restoring ecosystems;
  • catalyzing forest solutions;
  • renewable energy;
  • energy tax;
  • energy saving method;
  • increasing energy efficiency;
  • building energy code (BEC);
  • mandatory energy efficiency labeling scheme (MEELS);
  • European Union (EU) energy label;
  • solar impulse efficient solutions label;
  • energy efficiency management systems;
  • energy/carbon audit;
  • energy-efficient products;
  • energy-efficient manufacturing process;
  • zero/low carbon energy;
  • reducing meat consumption;
  • safe and convenient active transportation;
  • sustainable transportation;
  • vehicle emission reduction;
  • zero/low emission vehicle;
  • vehicle electrification;
  • zero/low emission building;
  • low carbon construction.

In view of the urgent need to solve the problem related to the Climate Emergency, we would like to invite researchers and professionals from universities, enterprises, and governmental units to share new ideas, innovations, trends, and experiences concerning the Climate Emergency. Both original research articles as well as review articles are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Wen-Hsien Tsai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • greenhouse gas (GHG) emission
  • environmental protection
  • climate change
  • climate emergency
  • global warming
  • carbon emission
  • carbon emission reduction
  • carbon emission cost analysis
  • greenhouse gas reduction
  • carbon tax
  • carbon trading
  • cap-and-trade
  • carbon offset
  • carbon pricing
  • carbon footprint
  • carbon label
  • decarbonizing the economy
  • carbon capture and storage
  • carbon recycling
  • eliminating pollutants
  • restoring ecosystems
  • catalyzing forest solutions
  • renewable energy
  • energy tax
  • energy saving method
  • increasing energy efficiency
  • building energy code (BEC)
  • mandatory energy efficiency labeling scheme (MEELS)
  • European Union (EU) energy label
  • solar impulse efficient solutions label
  • energy efficiency management systems
  • energy/carbon audit
  • energy-efficient products
  • energy-efficient manufacturing process
  • zero/low carbon energy
  • reducing meat consumption
  • safe and convenient active transportation
  • sustainable transportation
  • vehicle emission reduction
  • zero/low emission vehicle
  • vehicle electrification
  • zero/low emission building
  • low carbon construction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Regional Sustainable Development with Environmental Performance: Measuring Growth Indexes on Chinese Provinces
Energies 2020, 13(8), 2047; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13082047 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The rapid economic growth of China in the past decades has been accompanied by serious environmental problems. In the country, both economic development and environmental pollution show a geographically uneven pattern, with some regions displaying significantly better performance than others in economic and/or [...] Read more.
The rapid economic growth of China in the past decades has been accompanied by serious environmental problems. In the country, both economic development and environmental pollution show a geographically uneven pattern, with some regions displaying significantly better performance than others in economic and/or environmental performance. To understand the regional pattern of economic and environmental performance, this article analyzes sustainable development at the Chinese provincial level. Three sustainability indices are defined and computed by combining economic and environmental factors based on data envelopment analysis. The three indices correspond to the concepts of natural disposability, managerial disposability and null-joint relationship, respectively. Natural (managerial) disposability prioritizes economic (environmental) outcome in measuring sustainability. Furthermore, the assumption of a null-joint relationship implies that undesirable outputs are by-products of desirable outputs. We derive the three indices for the data on Chinese provinces over 2004–2017. We find that, in all indices, a small group of provinces have been maintaining very stable performance improvement over time, whereas a few provinces exhibit drastic swings in performance. Moreover, the fast-growing economies of some provinces contrast sharply with their poor sustainable development. Among the pollutants under study, carbon emissions play an important role in benchmarking the sustainability level for certain provinces. Further, provincial-level performance can be attributed to geographical and economic factors. Policy implications and future research are discussed based on the empirical results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solutions to Climate Emergency)
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Open AccessArticle
Time Series Decomposition of the Daily Outdoor Air Temperature in Europe for Long-Term Energy Forecasting in the Context of Climate Change
Energies 2020, 13(7), 1569; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13071569 - 29 Mar 2020
Abstract
Temperature is widely known as one of the most important drivers to forecast electricity and gas variables, such as the load. Because of that reason, temperature forecasting is and has been for years of great interest for energy forecasters and several approaches and [...] Read more.
Temperature is widely known as one of the most important drivers to forecast electricity and gas variables, such as the load. Because of that reason, temperature forecasting is and has been for years of great interest for energy forecasters and several approaches and methods have been published. However, these methods usually do not consider temperature trend, which causes important error increases when dealing with medium- or long-term estimations. This paper presents several temperature forecasting methods based on time series decomposition and analyzes their results and the trends of 37 different European countries, proving their annual average temperature increase and their different behaviors regarding trend and seasonal components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solutions to Climate Emergency)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Energy-Sufficiency for a Just Transition: A Systematic Review
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2444; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102444 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Efforts to achieve an energy transition often neglect to account for the levelling of benefits realizable with higher levels of energy use, despite knowledge of a saturation effect and recognition of increasing harms of use. This research examines energy sufficiency as a maximum [...] Read more.
Efforts to achieve an energy transition often neglect to account for the levelling of benefits realizable with higher levels of energy use, despite knowledge of a saturation effect and recognition of increasing harms of use. This research examines energy sufficiency as a maximum quantity of energy associated with improvements in human well-being to inform a recalibration of energy targets among high-energy societies. A systematic review of recent research was performed to identify the point at which increasing levels of energy use no longer correlate with meaningful increases in well-being. For selected studies (n = 18), energy sufficiency values range from 60–221 gigajoules per capita per year with a mean of 132 gigajoules per capita per year for associated measures of well-being. The review finds agreement in a pattern of saturation and provides a range of values for energy sufficiency maximums, suggesting that a relatively modest amount and a diverse quality of energy is needed to support high levels of human well-being. Beyond the conventional emphasis on energy efficiency and renewable energy, energy sufficiency therefore offers a necessary and complementary approach for supporting just and ecological energy transitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solutions to Climate Emergency)
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