Special Issue "Wave Energy Converters (WECs)"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Wind, Wave and Tidal Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pedro Jesús Cabrera Santana
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Campus de Tafira s/n, 35017, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain
Interests: smart energy systems; intelligent control; energy–water nexus; wind power; renewable energy
Prof. Dr. José Antonio Carta González
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Campus de Tafira s/n, 35017, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain
Interests: wind power; renewable energy; energy–water nexus; renewable applied energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite submissions to a Special Issue of the journal Energies on the topic of Wave Energy Converters.

Wave energy is a type of renewable energy that is growing in popularity and use, and which is demonstrating a potential that is garnering more and more interest. Its main advantages include its having one of the highest energy densities among renewable energy sources, a limited environmental impact, and a natural seasonal variability that facilitates estimations of its availability. Nonetheless, despite the potential benefits that this renewable source offers, its application and the research that has been conducted on it are still at a relatively early stage.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to try to fill the knowledge gap that presently exists on this topic. The aim is to encourage original contributions regarding recent developments and ideas in wave energy converters. An additional goal is to include other novel approaches used with other types of renewable energy sources. Potential topics include but are not limited to wave energy technologies; the development of optimum control systems (predictive, intelligent control, etc.) applied to this energy source; the development, modelling, simulation, and testing of the different subsystems that comprise WECs (mechanical systems, power electronic systems, etc.); the study of the application of WECs for different purposes (WECs and seawater desalination, WECs and electricity charging, etc.); the use of forecasting techniques (short-term and long-term forecasting) to estimate the availability of this energy resource in an area; grid interconnection; the impact on power systems (weak and/or robust electrical power systems); the efficiency and economics of WECs; the use of arrays (farms) of WECs; and the combination of wave and offshore wind energy.

Dr. Pedro Jesús Cabrera Santana
Prof. Dr. José Antonio Carta González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wave energy converters
  • Optimum control
  • Wave energy forecasting
  • Wave energy converters applications
  • Offshore wind energy and wave energy combination
  • Numerical modeling
  • Power electronics
  • Machine learning
  • Power system

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Performance of a Spectral Wave Model at Predicting Wave Farm Impacts
Energies 2020, 13(21), 5728; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215728 - 02 Nov 2020
Abstract
For renewable ocean wave energy to support global energy demands, wave energy converters (WECs) will likely be deployed in large numbers (farms), which will necessarily change the nearshore environment. Wave farm induced changes can be both helpful (e.g., beneficial habitat and coastal protection) [...] Read more.
For renewable ocean wave energy to support global energy demands, wave energy converters (WECs) will likely be deployed in large numbers (farms), which will necessarily change the nearshore environment. Wave farm induced changes can be both helpful (e.g., beneficial habitat and coastal protection) and potentially harmful (e.g., degraded habitat, recreational, and commercial use) to existing users of the coastal environment. It is essential to estimate this impact through modeling prior to the development of a farm, and to that end, many researchers have used spectral wave models, such as Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), to assess wave farm impacts. However, the validity of the approaches used within SWAN have not been thoroughly verified or validated. Herein, a version of SWAN, called Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)-SWAN, which has a specialized WEC implementation, is verified by comparing its wave field outputs to those of linear wave interaction theory (LWIT), where LWIT is theoretically more appropriate for modeling wave-body interactions and wave field effects. The focus is on medium-sized arrays of 27 WECs, wave periods, and directional spreading representative of likely conditions, as well as the impact on the nearshore. A quantitative metric, the Mean Squared Skill Score, is used. Results show that the performance of SNL-SWAN as compared to LWIT is “Good” to “Excellent”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave Energy Converters (WECs))
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical and Experimental Investigation on a Moonpool-Buoy Wave Energy Converter
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2364; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092364 - 09 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper introduces a new point-absorber wave energy converter (WEC) with a moonpool buoy—the moonpool platform wave energy converter (MPWEC). The MPWEC structure includes a cylinder buoy and a moonpool buoy and a Power Take-off (PTO) system, where the relative movement between the [...] Read more.
This paper introduces a new point-absorber wave energy converter (WEC) with a moonpool buoy—the moonpool platform wave energy converter (MPWEC). The MPWEC structure includes a cylinder buoy and a moonpool buoy and a Power Take-off (PTO) system, where the relative movement between the cylindrical buoy and the moonpool buoy is exploited by the PTO system to generate energy. A 1:10 scale model was physically tested to validate the numerical model and further prove the feasibility of the proposed system. The motion responses of and the power absorbed by the MPWEC studied in the wave tank experiments were also numerically analyzed, with a potential approach in the frequency domain, and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code in the time domain. The good agreement between the experimental and the numerical results showed that the present numerical model is accurate enough, and therefore considering only the heave degree of freedom is acceptable to estimate the motion responses and power absorption. The study shows that the MPWEC optimum power extractions is realized over a range of wave frequencies between 1.7 and 2.5 rad/s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave Energy Converters (WECs))
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