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Numerical and Experimental Investigation on a Moonpool-Buoy Wave Energy Converter
Article

The Performance of a Spectral Wave Model at Predicting Wave Farm Impacts

1
Mocean Energy, Edinburgh EH9 3BF, UK
2
Mott MacDonald, Seattle, WA 98101, USA
3
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(21), 5728; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215728
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 22 October 2020 / Accepted: 28 October 2020 / Published: 2 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave Energy Converters (WECs))
For renewable ocean wave energy to support global energy demands, wave energy converters (WECs) will likely be deployed in large numbers (farms), which will necessarily change the nearshore environment. Wave farm induced changes can be both helpful (e.g., beneficial habitat and coastal protection) and potentially harmful (e.g., degraded habitat, recreational, and commercial use) to existing users of the coastal environment. It is essential to estimate this impact through modeling prior to the development of a farm, and to that end, many researchers have used spectral wave models, such as Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), to assess wave farm impacts. However, the validity of the approaches used within SWAN have not been thoroughly verified or validated. Herein, a version of SWAN, called Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)-SWAN, which has a specialized WEC implementation, is verified by comparing its wave field outputs to those of linear wave interaction theory (LWIT), where LWIT is theoretically more appropriate for modeling wave-body interactions and wave field effects. The focus is on medium-sized arrays of 27 WECs, wave periods, and directional spreading representative of likely conditions, as well as the impact on the nearshore. A quantitative metric, the Mean Squared Skill Score, is used. Results show that the performance of SNL-SWAN as compared to LWIT is “Good” to “Excellent”. View Full-Text
Keywords: wave energy converters; numerical modeling; wave farms; spectral wave models; environmental impacts wave energy converters; numerical modeling; wave farms; spectral wave models; environmental impacts
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MDPI and ACS Style

McNatt, J.C.; Porter, A.; Chartrand, C.; Roberts, J. The Performance of a Spectral Wave Model at Predicting Wave Farm Impacts. Energies 2020, 13, 5728. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215728

AMA Style

McNatt JC, Porter A, Chartrand C, Roberts J. The Performance of a Spectral Wave Model at Predicting Wave Farm Impacts. Energies. 2020; 13(21):5728. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215728

Chicago/Turabian Style

McNatt, J. C.; Porter, Aaron; Chartrand, Christopher; Roberts, Jesse. 2020. "The Performance of a Spectral Wave Model at Predicting Wave Farm Impacts" Energies 13, no. 21: 5728. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215728

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