Special Issue "Perovskite Solar Cells"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bart Roose
Website
Guest Editor
Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE Cambridge, UK
Interests: perovskite solar cells; stability; sustainable energy; solar energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Perovskite solar cells are rapidly becoming a new paradigm in photovoltaic energy conversion. They have been demonstrated to compete with established materials such as silicon at the lab scale, with a power conversion efficiency exceeding 25% in single-junction perovskite-based devices. Perovskites offer the opportunity to work in tandem with other photovoltaic materials in double and triple-junction solar cells. However, there remains a challenge in making the perovskite stable under solar cell working conditions. In this Special Issue of Energies, we aim to present a collection of experimental and review papers reporting the most recent advances in the field. In particular, we are interested in papers detailing new solutions to increasing the stability of perovskite solar cells compatible with established technologies. We will give priority to works focusing on environmentally safe solutions, which include the use of lead-free perovskites and green processing.

Dr. Bart Roose
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • perovskite solar cell
  • halide perovskite
  • photovoltaic
  • solar energy
  • renewable

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Stannite Quaternary Cu2M(M = Ni, Co)SnS4 as Low Cost Inorganic Hole Transport Materials in Perovskite Solar Cells
Energies 2020, 13(22), 5938; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13225938 - 13 Nov 2020
Abstract
In this study, inorganic stannite quaternary Cu2M(M = Ni, Co)SnS4 (CMTS) is explored as a low-cost, earth abundant, environmentally friendly and chemically stable hole transport material (HTM). CMTS nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile and mild solvothermal method and processed [...] Read more.
In this study, inorganic stannite quaternary Cu2M(M = Ni, Co)SnS4 (CMTS) is explored as a low-cost, earth abundant, environmentally friendly and chemically stable hole transport material (HTM). CMTS nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile and mild solvothermal method and processed into aggregated nanoparticle inks, which were applied in n-i-p perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The results show that Cu2NiSnS4 (CNiTS) is more promising as an HTM than Cu2CoSnS4 (CCoTS), showing efficient charge injection as evidenced by considerable photoluminescence quenching and lower series resistance from Nyquist plots, as well as higher power conversion efficiency (PCE). Moreover, the perovskite layer coated by the CMTS HTM showed superior environmental stability after 200 h light soaking in 50% relative humidity, while organic HTMs suffer from a severe drop in perovskite absorption. Although the obtained PCEs are modest, this study shows that the cost effective and stable inorganic CMTSs are promising HTMs, which can contribute towards PSC commercialization, if the field can further optimize CMTS energy levels through compositional engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Emerging Photovoltaic (PV) Materials for a Low Carbon Economy
Energies 2020, 13(16), 4131; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13164131 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Emerging photovoltaic (PV) technologies have a potential to address the shortcomings of today’s energy market which heavily depends on the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation. We created inventories that offer insights into the environmental impacts and cost of all the materials [...] Read more.
Emerging photovoltaic (PV) technologies have a potential to address the shortcomings of today’s energy market which heavily depends on the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation. We created inventories that offer insights into the environmental impacts and cost of all the materials used in emerging PV technologies, including perovskites, polymers, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and quantum dots. The results show that the CO2 emissions associated with the absorber layers are much less than the CO2 emissions associated with the contact and charge selective layers. The CdS (charge selective layer) and ITO (contact layer) have the highest environmental impacts compared to Al2O3, CuI, CuSCN, MoO3, NiO, poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT)), phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), poly polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS), SnO2, spiro-OMeTAD, and TiO2 (charge selective layers) and Al, Ag, Cu, FTO, Mo, ZnO:In, and ZnO/ZnO:Al (contact layers). The cost assessments show that the organic materials, such as polymer absorbers, CNT, P3HT and spiro-OMeTAD, are the most expensive materials. Inorganic materials would be more preferable to lower the cost of solar cells. All the remaining materials have a potential to be used in the commercial PV market. Finally, we analyzed the cost of PV materials based on their material intensity and CO2 emissions, and concluded that the perovskite absorber will be the most eco-efficient material that has the lowest cost and CO2 emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Co-Solvent Controllable Engineering of MA0.5FA0.5Pb0.8Sn0.2I3 Lead–Tin Mixed Perovskites for Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells with Improved Stability
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2438; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102438 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Use of a lead–tin mixed perovskite is generally considered an effective method to broaden the absorption wavelength of perovskite thin films. However, the preparation of lead–tin mixed perovskites is a major challenge due to the multivalent state of tin and stability in the [...] Read more.
Use of a lead–tin mixed perovskite is generally considered an effective method to broaden the absorption wavelength of perovskite thin films. However, the preparation of lead–tin mixed perovskites is a major challenge due to the multivalent state of tin and stability in the atmosphere. This study attempted to replace the organic cation and metal elements of perovskites with a relatively thermal stable formamidinium (FA+) and a more environmentally friendly tin element. MA0.5FA0.5Pb0.8Sn0.2I3 lead–tin mixed perovskite thin films were prepared with the one-step spin-coating method. By adjusting the dimethylformamide (DMF):dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) concentration ratio of the lead–tin mixed perovskite precursor solution, the surface morphologies, crystallinity, and light-absorbing properties of the films were changed during synthesis to optimize the lead–tin mixed perovskite films as a light-absorbing layer of the inverted perovskite solar cells. The quality of the prepared lead–tin mixed perovskite film was the highest when the ratio of DMF:DMSO = 1:4. The power-conversion efficiency of the perovskite solar cell prepared with the film was 8.05%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
The Low-Dimensional Three-Dimensional Tin Halide Perovskite: Film Characterization and Device Performance
Energies 2020, 13(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010002 - 18 Dec 2019
Cited by 9
Abstract
Halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are considered as one of the most promising candidates for the next generation solar cells as their power conversion efficiency (PCE) has rapidly increased up to 25.2%. However, the most efficient halide perovskite materials all contain toxic lead. [...] Read more.
Halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are considered as one of the most promising candidates for the next generation solar cells as their power conversion efficiency (PCE) has rapidly increased up to 25.2%. However, the most efficient halide perovskite materials all contain toxic lead. Replacing the lead cation with environmentally friendly tin (Sn) is proposed as an important alternative. Today, the inferior performance of Sn-based PSCs mainly due to two challenging issues, namely the facile oxidation of Sn2+ to Sn4+ and the low formation energies of Sn vacancies. Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskite, in which the large sized organic cations confine the corner sharing BX6 octahedra, exhibits higher formation energy than that of three-dimensional (3D) structure halide perovskite. The approach of mixing a small amount of 2D into 3D Sn-based perovskites was demonstrated as an efficient method to produce high performance perovskite films. In this review, we first provide an overview of key points for making high performance PSCs. Then we give an introduction to the physical parameters of 3D ASnX3 (MA+, FA+, and Cs+) perovskite and a photovoltaic device based on them, followed by an overview of 2D/3D halide perovskites based on ASnX3 (MA+ and FA+) and their optoelectronic applications. The current challenges and a future outlook of Sn-based PSCs are discussed in the end. This review will give readers a better understanding of the 2D/3D Sn-based PSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop