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Improvement of Gas Turbine Cooling Technology for Carbon Neutrality

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "I2: Energy and Combustion Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 385

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Hohai University, Changzhou 213022, China
Interests: film cooling; heat and mass transfer; turbulent flow
College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Hohai University, Changzhou 213022, China
Interests: solar thermal engineering; solar photocatalysis; optical reactor design; photovoltaic/thermal system
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To achieve carbon neutrality, both a rapid shift from fossil fuels to the broader exploitation of renewable energy sources and an efficient utilization of fossil fuels are needed. Gas turbines are widely used in air power, naval propulsion and power plants, which plays an important role in the utilization of fossil fuel. Generally, increasingly higher turbine inlet temperature contributes to higher thermal efficiency and power. Modern gas turbine systems target turbine inlet temperatures that vary from approximately 1600 K to 1900 K, which is far beyond the melting temperature of the superalloy substrate. In order to ensure durable and reliable operation, effective cooling measures must be applied to the high-temperature components of gas turbines. Cooling technology, however, is one of the most challenging problems in this field. 

With this general background, the Special Issue on the “Improvement of Gas Turbine Cooling Technology for Carbon Neutrality” is proposed to discuss the most recent technology to increase the cooling efficiency of gas turbines, helping to improve their energy efficiency. Research articles, review articles, as well as short communications are warmly invited. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The development of gas turbine cooling systems;
  • The fundamental science of cooling technology;
  • Numerical investigations on gas turbine cooling systems;
  • Experimental investigations on gas turbine cooling systems;
  • Thermodynamic analyses of critical and trans-critical Rankine cycle systems.

I am writing to invite you to submit your original work to this Special Issue. I am looking forward to receiving your outstanding research.

Dr. Yanqin Shangguan
Dr. Fei Cao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gas turbine
  • film cooling
  • cooling technology
  • internal cooling
  • external cooling
  • cooling efficiency
  • rankine cycle

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

22 pages, 1710 KiB  
Article
The Evolution of Flow Structures and Coolant Coverage in Double-Row Film Cooling with Upstream Forward Jets and Downstream Backward Jets
by Yanqin Shangguan and Fei Cao
Energies 2024, 17(14), 3387; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17143387 - 10 Jul 2024
Viewed by 237
Abstract
The spatiotemporal evolution of the flow structures and coolant coverage of double-row film cooling with upstream forward jets and downstream backward jets, having a significant impact on film-cooling performance, is studied using the simplified thermal lattice Boltzmann method (STLBM). Moreover, the effect of [...] Read more.
The spatiotemporal evolution of the flow structures and coolant coverage of double-row film cooling with upstream forward jets and downstream backward jets, having a significant impact on film-cooling performance, is studied using the simplified thermal lattice Boltzmann method (STLBM). Moreover, the effect of the inclination angle of downstream backward jets is considered. The high-performance simulations of film cooling have been conducted by using our verified in-house solver. Results show that special flow structures, such as a sand dune-shaped protrusion, appear in double-row film cooling with upstream forward jets and downstream backward jets, which is mainly because of the blockage effect resulting from the coolant jet with backward injection. The interaction among structures results in the generation of an anti-counterrotating vortex pair (anti-CVP). The anti-CVP with the downwash motion can result in the attachment of coolant to the bottom wall, which promotes the stability and lateral coverage of coolant film. The momentum and heat transport are strengthened as the backward jet is injected into the boundary layer of the mainstream. Although the downstream evolution of the backward jet is not very smooth, its core attaches closely to the bottom wall due to the downwash motion of anti-CVP. Moreover, there is an obvious backflow zone shown in the trailing edge of the downstream backward jet with a large inclination angle. The obvious backflow makes the coolant attach to the bottom wall well. Therefore, the film cooling effectiveness is improved as the inclination angle of the downstream backward jet varies from αdown=135o to αdown=155o, with a constant blowing ratio of BR=0.5. In addition, the fluctuation of the bottom wall’s temperature is weak due to the stable coverage of the coolant layer under αdown=155o. The film-cooling performance with an inclination angle of αdown=155o is the best among all the cases studied in this work. This work provides essential insights into film cooling with backward coolant injection and contributes to obtaining a complete understanding of film cooling with backward coolant injection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvement of Gas Turbine Cooling Technology for Carbon Neutrality)
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