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The Future of Energy Policy

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2023) | Viewed by 62352

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon emissions are increasing, and the effects of climate change are posing a worldwide challenge. One of the most important contributors to the increase in CO2 emissions is energy. Countries are facing several challenges in shifting to energy transition due to the lack of investments, lack of grid infrastructure, mismatch of supply and demand, and lack of energy policies at national and local levels. Although renewable energies are a fast-growing energy source, they made up only 29% of global electricity generation in 2020. Moreover, the recent Russia–Ukraine war may prove to have a profound impact on the future of energy policies. While the energy transition is a megatrend worldwide, it is worth mentioning that in some countries, especially in Europe, the recent war is forcing a reconsideration of coal and oil policies. At the same time, green energy policies are being reconsidered and accelerated given the high prices in the energy markets. However, strong efforts are required from all countries in order to decarbonize their energy systems and to shift to a green energy transition. The potential of new technologies and green hydrogen could be a game changer in the future of energy worldwide. 

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect theoretical and practical analyses of the energy transition and the future of energy policy for different actors (individuals, workers, firms, regions, countries, etc.). It aims to understand how renewable energies can shift to a sustainable world, and what policies need to be implemented in order enact the energy transition. This Special Issue also welcomes contributions at the methodological level presenting new ways of capturing the future of energy policy in different countries. It is also open to case studies (policies at country level, local policies, etc.).

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The future of energy policy;
  • Energy transition and energy policies needed;
  • Climate change and energy transition;
  • Renewable energies;
  • The potential of green hydrogen;
  • Technologies and energy transition;
  • Greenhouse gases and energy transition;
  • Challenges to energy transition;
  • Energy policy and sustainability;
  • Low-carbon economy and energy transition;
  • Global crisis and energy transition.

Prof. Dr. Adel Ben Youssef
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy policy
  • renewable energy
  • sustainability
  • energy transition
  • low-carbon economy
  • energy efficiency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 501 KiB  
Article
Do Environmental Innovation and Green Energy Matter for Environmental Sustainability? Evidence from Saudi Arabia (1990–2018)
by Montassar Kahia, Bilel Jarraya, Bassem Kahouli and Anis Omri
Energies 2023, 16(3), 1376; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16031376 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1987
Abstract
Climate change and global warming, caused by excessive carbon emissions from transportation and other environmentally hazardous activities, are serious problems for many countries nowadays. Therefore, while some countries are not making optimal use of their resources, others are working hard to preserve a [...] Read more.
Climate change and global warming, caused by excessive carbon emissions from transportation and other environmentally hazardous activities, are serious problems for many countries nowadays. Therefore, while some countries are not making optimal use of their resources, others are working hard to preserve a green and clean environment in order to foster long-term growth. Governments and policymakers throughout the world are finally starting to take the risks of climate change and global warming seriously. This paper extends previous literature related to environmental design practices by investigating the impacts of environmental innovation and the deployment of green energy on decreasing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for Saudi Arabia during the period 1990–2018. Different CO2 emission measures are incorporated in the analysis, namely per capita CO2 emissions, CO2 intensity, CO2 emissions from liquid fuel use, and CO2 emissions from heat and electricity generation. Overall, the outcomes of the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) technique demonstrate the presence of a long-term association between our two main variables (green energy use and environmental innovation) and the different measures of CO2 emissions, except CO2 emissions from liquid fuels consumption for green energy use and CO2 intensity for environmental innovation. In another sense, the use of renewable energies and technologies linked to environmental patents proves to be a good alternative if they do not contribute to environmental pollution. On the basis of the results, this study offers several policy recommendations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of Energy Policy)
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20 pages, 1009 KiB  
Review
Quantifying Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Human Deaths to Guide Energy Policy
by Joshua M. Pearce and Richard Parncutt
Energies 2023, 16(16), 6074; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16166074 - 19 Aug 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 59287
Abstract
When attempting to quantify future harms caused by carbon emissions and to set appropriate energy policies, it has been argued that the most important metric is the number of human deaths caused by climate change. Several studies have attempted to overcome the uncertainties [...] Read more.
When attempting to quantify future harms caused by carbon emissions and to set appropriate energy policies, it has been argued that the most important metric is the number of human deaths caused by climate change. Several studies have attempted to overcome the uncertainties associated with such forecasting. In this article, approaches to estimating future human death tolls from climate change relevant at any scale or location are compared and synthesized, and implications for energy policy are considered. Several studies are consistent with the “1000-ton rule,” according to which a future person is killed every time 1000 tons of fossil carbon are burned (order-of-magnitude estimate). If warming reaches or exceeds 2 °C this century, mainly richer humans will be responsible for killing roughly 1 billion mainly poorer humans through anthropogenic global warming, which is comparable with involuntary or negligent manslaughter. On this basis, relatively aggressive energy policies are summarized that would enable immediate and substantive decreases in carbon emissions. The limitations to such calculations are outlined and future work is recommended to accelerate the decarbonization of the global economy while minimizing the number of sacrificed human lives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of Energy Policy)
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