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Special Issue "Environment and Urban Systems: Simulation, Modeling and Analysis"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2022) | Viewed by 1446

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Pau Fonseca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Computing Laboratory, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: solution validation; simulation; optimization; energy saving; energy demand

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban systems and ecosystems are facing an increasing number of challenges because of climate change and its interconnection. The increase of the impact of urban systems on the environment and reciprocally, the increased impact of climate change on urban areas, energy consumption, food production, etc. is becoming a major policy issue.  We need to develop sustainable urban systems, that consider energetic, economic, and social factors, understanding the environmental factors that can affect these urban areas' development and also, how the urban areas can affect the environment.

The relation between the urban areas and the environment, and the need to cope with the limited natural resources require scientific research and novel technical solutions. We need models that help to understand the relation between the urban areas and the environment, forecast the effect of humankind on the environment, and discuss how to define greener urban areas.

The Special Issue of “Environment and Urban Systems: Simulation, Modeling and Analysis” in Energies serves as a publishing platform for scientific and technological approaches to “sustainability” modeling for urban areas and the environment.

While the focus lies on Simulation, Modeling and Analysis for the environment and urban areas, it also covers solutions for the design of sustainable buildings and cities, focused on the energy, but also the social and/or economic aspects. Also, we will cover novel techniques or case studies to model and forecast relevant aspects of the environment that will have an impact on society.

Studies of advanced techniques and methods in energy production that will have an impact on the reduction of the impacts are also welcome. Research involving experimental and numerical studies, case studies, recent developments, that can represent the current state-of-the-art of the emerging technologies and methodologies are highly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Pau Fonseca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban systems
  • climate change
  • environment
  • simulation
  • modeling
  • analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Urban Form on the Heat Island Phenomenon and Human Thermal Comfort: A Comparative Study of UAE Residential Sites
Energies 2022, 15(15), 5471; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15155471 - 28 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 530
Abstract
The Urban Heat Island (UHI) has a detrimental impact on human thermal comfort and the health of city dwellers through raising average temperatures. Urban geometry is one of the factors that affect the intensity of the UHI phenomena. The purpose of this research [...] Read more.
The Urban Heat Island (UHI) has a detrimental impact on human thermal comfort and the health of city dwellers through raising average temperatures. Urban geometry is one of the factors that affect the intensity of the UHI phenomena. The purpose of this research is to evaluate and compare traditional vs. modern urban forms with respect to temperature and thermal comfort in the United Arab Emirates. Three of each were chosen based on their densities and form. Traditional buildings in the UAE differ from others in the Middle East in that they are primarily single-story, while in the surrounding countries of the region, such as Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia, they are mainly two stories. The UAE climate also has its distinct characteristics. Each configuration was investigated using the ENVI-met urban microclimate simulation software. The comparisons were made for three seasons: summer, winter, and spring. Each configuration was evaluated through four parameters: building shape, street geometry, orientation, and urban density. The results revealed that the low-density traditional urban form exhibited the lowest air temperature in August because it has a low sky view factor (SVF), high height-to-width ratio, and less density. The highest ambient temperature was observed in the sites with low-medium density, lowest height/width ratio, and maximum SVF. The high-density modern urban form displayed lower air temperatures in the summer season than the low and low-medium-density modern urban sites due to the building form, high height-to-width ratio, low SVF, and wind corridors. The traditional compact urban form in Al Fahidi, which has the highest urban density of the six configurations, achieved the best thermal comfort levels in the summer due to the sizable height-to-width ratio and lowest SVF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Urban Systems: Simulation, Modeling and Analysis)
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Article
Contribution of Thermal Inertia to the Interior Climate of Girona Cathedral: Feasibility Analysis for the Preservation of Pieces of Art through the Monitoring of Thermal Conditions for 6 Years
Energies 2022, 15(4), 1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15041571 - 21 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 518
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to determine Girona Cathedral’s thermal performance and to verify that it is suitable for containing historical pieces of art. We present the results of our analysis of the indoor thermal conditions during the period from January 2011 [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to determine Girona Cathedral’s thermal performance and to verify that it is suitable for containing historical pieces of art. We present the results of our analysis of the indoor thermal conditions during the period from January 2011 to December 2016. Real data were collected from strategically located probes inside the cathedral and from an outside weather station. The results were compared with an EnergyPlus computer model to verify the calculations and improve decision making. The model considers the envelope’s thermal inertia, the characteristics of the enclosure, and the passive systems for performing thermal analysis. The cathedral’s indoor environment is very stable. Because of a high capability of thermal-energy accumulation, a one-month thermal lag between indoor and outdoor temperatures exists. Furthermore, the maximum and minimum temperatures are dampened, with a two-degree variation above or below the outdoor average, depending on the season. The outdoor humidity can vary from 40% to 100% daily, whereas the indoor humidity variation is around 5%. This indoor stable condition protects the artistic objects in the building. This six-year monitoring and analysis allows for the determination that high-inertia buildings are suitable for displaying and preserving pieces of art and antique furniture, protecting them from deterioration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Urban Systems: Simulation, Modeling and Analysis)
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