energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Selected Papers from 28th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition (EUBCE 2020)

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020) | Viewed by 6812

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Former European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: bioenergy; bioliquids; heat and electricity; power; climate change; socio-economic impact; biomass conversion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: fermentation; biomass; biorefinery; biofuels; bio-based products; techno-economic analysis; life cycle assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 28th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Conference (EUBCE), held during 6-9 July 2020, was the first virtual Biomass Conference in Europe (e-EUBCE 2020). EUBCE is one of the world’s leading R&D conferences combined with an international exhibition. EUBCE represents the leading platform for the collection, exchange, and dissemination of scientific know-how in the field of biomass and its utilization.

The 2020 conference program addressed many topics, including biomass production, biomass conversion to bioliquids and biofuels for heat and electricity, transport, and bio-based products, and covering all aspects of each value chain, from supply and logistics to conversion technologies, from the industrial application of research results to the impacts of biomass utilization on the environment, as well as aspects of market and trade and policy strategies, and last but not least the role of biomass as a source in integrated energy systems.

The 28th EUBCE also expanded its scope, from biomass resources and conversion to bioenergy and intermediate bioenergy carriers to integration into the bioeconomy, exploration of the role of agriculture in bioenergy production for energy and bioeconomy transition and looking at improvement of citizen awareness and engagement in support of biomass technologies.

Topics to be covered in this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Biomass feedstocks
  • Agriculture
  • Forestry 
  • Organic waste 
  • Bioenergy
  • Energy carriers 
  • Biofuels 
  • Biorefinery 
  • Bioeconomy 
  • Climate change 
  • Sustainability 
  • Impacts

The submission of excellent-quality papers in the aforementioned areas is highly encouraged. Please note each paper should contain about 50% new content compared to papers submitted for the EUBCE conference proceedings.

Dr. David Baxter
Dr. Solange I. Mussatto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 4491 KiB  
Article
Combined Use of Solar and Biomass Energy for Sustainable and Cost-Effective Low-Temperature Drying of Food Processing Residues on Industrial-Scale
by Özge Çepelioğullar Mutlu, Daniel Büchner, Steffi Theurich and Thomas Zeng
Energies 2021, 14(3), 561; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14030561 - 22 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2546
Abstract
In this study, a low-temperature drying plant based on renewable energies to dry food processing wastes is investigated. The demand-oriented heat supply is realized by a solar wall in combination with a biomass boiler. Due to the operational complexity of such a system [...] Read more.
In this study, a low-temperature drying plant based on renewable energies to dry food processing wastes is investigated. The demand-oriented heat supply is realized by a solar wall in combination with a biomass boiler. Due to the operational complexity of such a system with different sub-units and process parameters, steady-state simulations were performed in Aspen Plus to provide an insight into the process. Moreover, a time-resolved energetic evaluation was conducted to analyze the influence of varying capacity of the heat sources and operational strategy in addition to economic calculations. The simulations showed that an overall control strategy needs to consider the air properties as well as the flow rate of wet input material. In the reference case, the boiler must be operated at full load through the year to supply as much heat as possible. The revenue from the dried material was the most crucial parameter on the drying economics. Although the current plant configuration operating at 12 h per day and five days per week enable feasible results, the drying process can be more profitable by doubling the boiler capacity and increasing operational hours to 24 h per day and five days per week. The proposed plant can provide an environmentally friendly and cost-effective solution for the re-valorization of food-processing wastes into added-value compounds. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 2875 KiB  
Article
A Method for Assessing Regional Bioenergy Potentials Based on GIS Data and a Dynamic Yield Simulation Model
by Keyu Bao, Rushikesh Padsala, Volker Coors, Daniela Thrän and Bastian Schröter
Energies 2020, 13(24), 6488; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246488 - 8 Dec 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3162
Abstract
The assessment of regional bioenergy potentials from different types of natural land cover is an integral part of simulation tools that aim to assess local renewable energy systems. This work introduces a new workflow, which evaluates regional bioenergy potentials and its impact on [...] Read more.
The assessment of regional bioenergy potentials from different types of natural land cover is an integral part of simulation tools that aim to assess local renewable energy systems. This work introduces a new workflow, which evaluates regional bioenergy potentials and its impact on water demand based on geographical information system (GIS)-based land use data, satellite maps on local crop types and soil types, and conversion factors from biomass to bioenergy. The actual annual biomass yield of crops is assessed through an automated process considering the factors of local climate, crop type, soil, and irrigation. The crop biomass yields are validated with historic statistical data, with deviation less than 7% in most cases. Additionally, the resulting bioenergy potentials yield between 10.7 and 12.0 GWh/ha compared with 13.3 GWh/ha from other studies. The potential contribution from bioenergy on the energy demand were investigated in the two case studies, representing the agricultural-dominant rural area in North Germany and suburban region in South Germany: Simulation of the future bioenergy potential for 2050 shows only smaller effects from climate change (less than 4%) and irrigation (below 3%), but the potential to cover up to 21% of the transport fuels demand in scenario supporting biodiesel and bioethanol for transportation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop