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Alternative Fuels and Their Application for Transport - Recent Research and Challenges

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "I1: Fuel".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 December 2022) | Viewed by 7081

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Transport and Aviation Engineering, Department of Road Transport, Katowice, Poland
Interests: electric vehicles; life cycle assessment; electromobility; diagnostics of means of transport; finite element method; vibroacoustic diagnosis of machines and vehicles; alternative fuels

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Guest Editor
Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Transport and Aviation Engineering, Department of Road Transport, Katowice, Poland
Interests: electric vehicles; life cycle assessment; electromobility; alternative fuels
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions for a Special Issue of Energies on  "Alternative Fuels and Their Application for Transport - Recent Research and Challenges". Greenhouse gas emission and other air pollution from transport  are propelling to transition to new alternative  fuels. New alternative fuels with reduced carbon footprint and reduced fossil fuels depletion will be crucial. It is important to analyze for alternative fuels wih the full life cycle. Very promising alternative fuel is hydrogen, which play an important role in transport. However, the issue of the color of hydrogen must be considered: grey, blue and green. Topics of this Special Issue include, but not limited to: assessment of various alternative fuels apllication in transport with the life cycle approach,  various aspects of fuel use, including economic, social and environmental aspects and the importance of alternative fuels for sustainable development.  ​Electric vehicles and fuel-cell-powered vehicles are promising alternatives to internal combustion engine vehicles. This Special Issue invites authors to show their research of alternative fuels development in transport .

This Special Issue invites papers on original research and reviews focused on Application of Alternative Fuels in Transport, advanced propulsion systems, and alternative fuels, which can offer environmental and economic advantages in transport.  The aim of this Special Issue is to show knowledge and research of alternative fuels application in transport. 

Prof. Dr. Piotr Folęga
Prof. Dr. Dorota Burchart
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alternative fuels
  • Alternative powertrains
  • Electric vehicles
  • fuel-cell-powered vehicles
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Hydrogen life cycle
  • Greenhouse gas emission
  • Renewable sources

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 5161 KiB  
Article
Techno-Environmental Evaluation of a Liquefied Natural Gas-Fuelled Combined Gas Turbine with Steam Cycles for Large Container Ship Propulsion Systems
by Abdulaziz M. T. Alzayedi, Suresh Sampath and Pericles Pilidis
Energies 2022, 15(5), 1764; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15051764 - 27 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2138
Abstract
Restrictions on emissions are being imposed by regional and international shipping organisations, which raise the question of which marine fuel and technology can most effectively replace heavy fuel oil and diesel engines. The aim of this study is to find appropriate advanced combined [...] Read more.
Restrictions on emissions are being imposed by regional and international shipping organisations, which raise the question of which marine fuel and technology can most effectively replace heavy fuel oil and diesel engines. The aim of this study is to find appropriate advanced combined gas and steam turbine cycles for marine propulsion systems in a large container ship with respect to the evolving maritime environmental regulations. The selection criteria are the thermodynamic performance, emissions, size, and weight of advanced combined gas and steam turbine cycles in a large container ship. Two baselines are used: a diesel engine using marine diesel oil and a combined gas and steam turbine system using liquefied natural gas and marine diesel oil. Then, liquefied natural gas cycles are examined based on fuel replacement and enhanced to assess the benefits of liquefied natural gas over marine diesel oil. The results show that the enhanced liquefied natural gas combined gas and steam turbine cycles are the most efficient, at up to 1.6% higher than the other cycles. Regarding the size and weight, the combined gas and steam turbine propulsion system is approximately 24.7% lighter than the original diesel engine propulsion system. Full article
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22 pages, 10235 KiB  
Article
Exhaust Emissions Measurement of a Vehicle with Retrofitted LPG System
by Branislav Šarkan, Marek Jaśkiewicz, Przemysław Kubiak, Dariusz Tarnapowicz and Michal Loman
Energies 2022, 15(3), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15031184 - 6 Feb 2022
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 2635
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the production of exhaust emissions from a vehicle with a petrol engine with the Euro 4 emission standard and powered by petrol and LPG (liquefied petroleum gas). The paper presents new possibilities for [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the production of exhaust emissions from a vehicle with a petrol engine with the Euro 4 emission standard and powered by petrol and LPG (liquefied petroleum gas). The paper presents new possibilities for monitoring exhaust emissions using an exhaust gas analyzer. At the same time, it points out the topicality and significance of the issue in the monitored area. It examines the impact of a change in fuel on emissions. This change is monitored in various areas of vehicle operation. Measurements were performed during real operation, which means that the results are fully usable and applicable in practice. The driving simulation as well as the test conditions correspond to the RDE (Real Driving Emissions) test standard. A commercially available car was first selected to perform the tests, which was first measured in the original configuration (petrol drive). Based on real-time RDE driving tests, it is possible to determine the number of exhaust emissions. Subsequently, the same measurements were performed with the same vehicle, but the vehicle’s propulsion was changed to LPG. The vehicle was equipped with an additional system that allowed the vehicle to be powered by LPG. The results from the individual driving tests allowed the determination of the exhaust emissions. Emissions of CO (carbon monoxide), CO2 (carbon dioxide), HC (hydrocarbons), and NOx (nitrogen oxides) were monitored as a matter of priority. Through the driving tests, it was found that the gasoline combustion produced higher CO (1.926 g/km) and CO2 (217.693 g/km) emissions compared to the combustion of liquefied gas, where the concentration of the CO emissions was 1.892 g/km and that of the CO2 emissions was 213.966 g/km. In contrast, the HC (0.00397 g/km) and NOx (0.03107 g/km) emissions were lower when petrol was burned. During LPG combustion, the HC emissions reached 0.00430 g/km, and the NOx emissions reached 0.05134 g/km. At the end of the research, the authors compared the emissions determined by real driving (in g/km) with the emission values produced by the emission standard EURO 4 and the certificate of conformity (COC). Practical measurements showed that the vehicle produced excessive amounts of CO when burning gasoline. This production is 0.926 g/km higher and 0.892 g/km higher when burning LPG compared to the limit set by the Euro 4 Emission Standard. The difference is even greater than the limit value stated in the COC document. For other substances, the monitored values are in the norm and are even far below the permitted value Full article
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9 pages, 3224 KiB  
Article
Experimental Investigation on the Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Compression Ignition Engine Using Waste-Based Tire Pyrolysis Fuel and Diesel Fuel Blends
by István Péter Kondor, Máté Zöldy and Dénes Mihály
Energies 2021, 14(23), 7903; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14237903 - 25 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1489
Abstract
Due to the world’s growing population, the size of areas intended for food production in many countries of the world can only be achieved through severe environmental damage and deforestation, which has many other detrimental consequences in addition to accelerating global warming. By [...] Read more.
Due to the world’s growing population, the size of areas intended for food production in many countries of the world can only be achieved through severe environmental damage and deforestation, which has many other detrimental consequences in addition to accelerating global warming. By replacing the bio-content of fuels with other alternative fuels, land that is used for energy crops can also be used to grow food, thus mitigating the damaging effects of deforestation. Waste-based tire pyrolysis oil (TPO) can be a promising solution to replace the bio-proportion of diesel fuel. Since it is made from waste tires, it is also an optimal solution for recycling waste. This research shows the effect of different low-volume-percent tire pyrolyzed oil blended with diesel on the performance, fuel consumption, and emissions on a Mitsubishi S4S-DT industrial diesel engine. Four different premixed ratios of TPO were investigated (2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%) as well as pyrolysis oil and 100% diesel oil; however, the following studies will only include the data from the pure diesel and the 10% TPO measurements. The experimental investigations were in an AVL electric dynamometer, the soot measurements were in an AVL (Anstalt für Verbrennungskraftmaschinen List) Micro soot sensor (MSS), and the emission measurements were in a AVL Furier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) taken. The scope of research was to investigate the effect of low volume percentage TPO on performance and emissions on a light-duty diesel engine. Full article
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