Recent Advances in New Generation Compound Semiconductor Based Photodetectors and Solar Cells

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Semiconductor Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 632

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Integrated Circuits and Electronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100000, China
Interests: emerging compound semiconductors for eco-friendly photodetectors and solar cells

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Integrated Circuits and Electronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100000, China
Interests: perovskite optoelectronic devices; photoelectric detector; artificial synapse

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inorganic compound semiconductors drive the rapid development in modern optoelectronics, where III-V groups, chalcogenides, and lead halide perovskites, either in their thin film and low dimensional form, showed superior functionalities in areas of lighting and lasing, IR sensing and imaging, renewable energy, etc. Though conventional thin film crystals such as InP, InGaAs, HgCdTe, etc., have been demonstrated with decent solar cell efficiency and photodetecting sensitivity, the issue of cost/abundancy or/and environmental and health impacts has been of great concern in scaled applications. Therefore, the needs of low-cost, RoHS (restriction of hazardous substances) compliant, high-performance optoelectronic technologies promote recent advances in new-generation compound semiconductor-based photodetectors and solar cells, which have been attracting broad and worldwide attention.

This Special Issue offers a platform for comprehensive research communications on the thermal topic of recent advances in new photodetector and solar cell technologies, in addressing the balance of material toxicity, fabrication cost, and performance, through the newly emerged compound semiconducting materials (e.g., perovskite, kesterite, quantum dots, 2D materials, etc.), device physics (e.g., defects, interfaces, heterostructures, etc.), and new (opto)electronic designs (e.g., neuromorphic, multifunctional, on-chip-integration, etc.).

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

(1) Eco-friendly, earth-abundant compound semiconductors for optoelectronics;

(2) Perovskite solar cell and photodetectors;

(3) 2D materials and quantum dot-based optoelectronic devices;

(4) Exploring novel semiconductor-based materials and optoelectronic devices;

(5) Image sensors and integrated optoelectronic devices based on compound semiconductors.

Prof. Dr. Zhuoran Wang
Dr. Ying Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • solar cells
  • photodetectors
  • compound semiconductors
  • optoelectronics
  • perovskite
  • kesterite
  • 2D Materials
  • quantum dots

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2707 KiB  
Article
Ternary Polymer Solar Cells: Impact of Non-Fullerene Acceptors on Optical and Morphological Properties
by Quentin Eynaud, Tomoyuki Koganezawa, Hidehiro Sekimoto, Mohamed el Amine Kramdi, Gilles Quéléver, Olivier Margeat, Jörg Ackermann, Noriyuki Yoshimoto and Christine Videlot-Ackermann
Electronics 2024, 13(9), 1752; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics13091752 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 472
Abstract
Ternary organic solar cells contain a single three-component photoactive layer with a wide absorption window, achieved without the need for multiple stacking. However, adding a third component into a well-known binary blend can influence the energetics, optical window, charge carrier transport, crystalline order [...] Read more.
Ternary organic solar cells contain a single three-component photoactive layer with a wide absorption window, achieved without the need for multiple stacking. However, adding a third component into a well-known binary blend can influence the energetics, optical window, charge carrier transport, crystalline order and conversion efficiency. In the form of binary blends, the low-bandgap regioregular polymer donor poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), known as P3HT, is combined with the acceptor PC61BM, an inexpensive fullerene derivative. Two different non-fullerene acceptors (ITIC and eh-IDTBR) are added to this binary blend to form ternary blends. A systematic comparison between binary and ternary systems was carried out as a function of the thermal annealing temperature of organic layers (100 °C and 140 °C). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) is improved due to increased fill factor (FF) and open-circuit voltage (Voc) for thermal-annealed ternary blends at 140 °C. The transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated in binary and ternary blends following a Space-Charge-Limited Current (SCLC) protocol. A favorable balanced hole–electron mobility is obtained through the incorporation of either ITIC or eh-IDTBR. The charge transport behavior is correlated with the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) morphology deduced from atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact water angle (CWA) measurement and 2D grazing-incidence X-ray diffractometry (2D-GIXRD). Full article
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