Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 33313

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the adolescent stage, numerous, rapid and important changes occur. A person becomes biologically, socially, and psychologically mature, and can live independently. The characteristics of normal psychosocial development in adolescence are the result of the interaction that links the development achieved in previous stages of the life cycle, the biological factors of this stage, and the influence of multiple social and cultural determinants.

The adolescent begins two important processes in their development: seeking self-knowledge and achieving autonomy. A good understanding of these processes helps people better manage stress at this stage. One of the characteristics of adolescence is the development of emotional intelligence, which facilitates progressive autonomy and contributes to well-being and psychosocial development, protecting young people from developing psychological problems in the face of stressful life experiences, where good emotional functioning is essential.

Acquiring emotional intelligence is an educational, permanent, and continuous process that is intended to promote the development of emotional competencies as an essential element of human development to qualify people for life and increase personal and social well-being.

Along with this, life satisfaction is defined as a global evaluation that a person makes of their life. For this, the person evaluates the tangible aspects of their life, weighs the good and the bad, comparing it with standards chosen by them, and makes a judgment on satisfaction with their life. The results of this satisfaction depend on the comparisons that the subject makes between the circumstances of their life and the standard that they consider to be appropriate. This last nuance is important, since it is not an externally imposed standard but is a self-imposed criterion. Hence, the analysis of the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction can help us to understand adolescent development.

This Special Issue seeks research papers on various aspects of the development of emotional intelligence in adolescence and life satisfaction. We especially encourage the presentation of interdisciplinary work and multinational collaborative research. We also encourage the submission of manuscripts that focus on issues related to emotional intelligence and life satisfaction in adolescence, the environment, and related issues. We welcome original research papers using different study designs, as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Salavera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ability emotional intelligence
  • trait emotional intelligence
  • life satisfaction
  • adolescents
  • children
  • emotional development
  • emotional intelligence measures
  • emotional intelligence intervention
  • social development

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 341 KiB  
Article
A Closer Look at the Emotional Intelligence Construct: How Do Emotional Intelligence Facets Relate to Life Satisfaction in Students Involved in Bullying and Cyberbullying?
by Cirenia Quintana-Orts, Sergio Mérida-López, Lourdes Rey and Natalio Extremera
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(3), 711-725; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11030051 - 9 Jul 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5070
Abstract
Adolescents’ perception of their own emotional abilities has been related to psychological adjustment and well-being. However, there are still few studies focusing on specific emotional dimensions in relation to bullying and well-being in adolescence. This study analysed the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) [...] Read more.
Adolescents’ perception of their own emotional abilities has been related to psychological adjustment and well-being. However, there are still few studies focusing on specific emotional dimensions in relation to bullying and well-being in adolescence. This study analysed the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) facets, satisfaction with life, bullying and cyberbullying in adolescents. The sample consisted of 3520 high school students (51.5% females) aged between 12 and 18 years (M = 14.37; SD = 1.67). The correlation analyses showed that the majority of EI facets were positively related to satisfaction with life and negatively with both types of violence. As was expected, bullying and cyberbullying victims and bully–victims scored lower in satisfaction with life and the majority of EI facets. Controlling for sex, age, and grade, self-emotion appraisal, use of emotions and regulation of emotion were the best predictors of life satisfaction in bully–victims of bullying and cyberbullying. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these findings for clinical and educational practice on EI seeking to promote subjective well-being among adolescents involved in bullying and cyberbullying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
13 pages, 1739 KiB  
Article
Emotional Intelligence Profiles and Mobbing in Nursing: The Mediating Role of Social Support and Sensitivity to Anxiety
by María del Mar Molero Jurado, África Martos Martínez, Ana Belén Barragán Martín, María del Mar Simón Márquez, Nieves Fátima Oropesa Ruiz, Maria Sisto, María del Carmen Pérez-Fuentes and José Jesús Gázquez Linares
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 345-357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020026 - 6 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4718
Abstract
The prevalence of mobbing among nurses in various countries is around 17–20%. Some researchers have attempted to explain the success or failure of adaptation to the work environment and teamwork and to buffer the effects of psychological harassment in the workplace by incorporating [...] Read more.
The prevalence of mobbing among nurses in various countries is around 17–20%. Some researchers have attempted to explain the success or failure of adaptation to the work environment and teamwork and to buffer the effects of psychological harassment in the workplace by incorporating emotional intelligence into the mobbing context. As its main objectives, this quantitative, observational, cross-sectional study analyzed the relationship between emotional intelligence and mobbing as perceived by nurses and sought to establish the mediating roles of other variables involved, such as social support and sensitivity to anxiety. The final sample consisted of 1357 Spanish, self-selected nurses aged 22–58 from multiple healthcare institutions. The questionnaires (Perceived Psychological Harassment Questionnaire, The Brief Emotional Intelligence Inventory, Brief Perceived Social Support Questionnaire, Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3) were implemented on a web platform, which enabled the participants to complete them online. Descriptive analyses and mediation models were estimated. Personal characteristics related to high sensitivity to anxiety and low emotional intelligence implied greater presence of mobbing at work. This mobbing may be buffered if the person perceives enough support from family, friends or significant others. Our results recommend reinforcing the social support network of nursing personnel to improve the work climate and training them in emotional intelligence in university and on-the-job programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
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11 pages, 268 KiB  
Article
The Relationship of Personality, Emotional Intelligence, and Aggressiveness in Students: A Study Using the Big Five Personality Questionnaire for Children and Adults (BFQ-NA)
by Jose Luis Antoñanzas
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 1-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11010001 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5404
Abstract
An analysis of secondary students’ personality traits, along with a description of their emotional intelligence levels and their anger control, could be decisive when educating students to prevent anti-social behavior in academia. Very few studies on personality, emotional intelligence, and aggressive conduct exist [...] Read more.
An analysis of secondary students’ personality traits, along with a description of their emotional intelligence levels and their anger control, could be decisive when educating students to prevent anti-social behavior in academia. Very few studies on personality, emotional intelligence, and aggressive conduct exist in Spain. Some of the studies that do exist, however, only explore the relationship between emotional intelligence, personality, and prosocial behavior in secondary education students. Likewise, there are few studies focusing on personality and aggression control. In this study, using the Big Five personality models as predictors of aggressiveness in subjects and of emotional intelligence, we sought to contribute to the improvement of the education of students on aggressive behavior in education centers. To do this, we conducted a study using the Big Five Personality Questionnaire (BFQ) for Children and Adults (BFQ-NA), the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS-24) emotional intelligence test, and the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) anger management test. Our main objective was to analyze the relationship of the BFQ with the variables of emotional intelligence and aggressiveness. This was achieved using a range of bivariate correlation and multiple regression tests. The results showed the correlation and predictive value of emotional intelligence and aggression in the Big Five model of personality. This study coincides with other research linking Big Five questionnaires with emotional intelligence and aggression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
14 pages, 287 KiB  
Article
The Emotional Divergent–Convergent Thinking Program (EDICOP): Design, Implementation, and Results
by Goretti Soroa, Aitor Aritzeta, Alexander Muela, Nekane Balluerka, Arantxa Gorostiaga and Jone Aliri
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(4), 1051-1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10040074 - 13 Nov 2020
Viewed by 3283
Abstract
In a social environment that requires young people to adapt to increasingly demanding situations, emotional education and creativity training may be key for both personal development and academic performance. Given that there are currently no known interventions that develop emotional and creative skills [...] Read more.
In a social environment that requires young people to adapt to increasingly demanding situations, emotional education and creativity training may be key for both personal development and academic performance. Given that there are currently no known interventions that develop emotional and creative skills simultaneously in a youth population, the main objective of this study was to design, implement, and evaluate the Emotional Divergent–Convergent Thinking Program (EDICOP). The study design was quasi-experimental with a non-equivalent control group and pretest–posttest measures. The participants included 196 students between 16 and 24 years of age belonging to two centers of higher education. Our results showed that the EDICOP contributed to the improvement of the participants’ divergent-proactive style, positive affectivity, emotional predisposition, and attention, as well as to their preference for cognition. Overall, the EDICOP is, therefore, both relevant and useful, and further research on the mood–creativity link is merited to generate new contexts in higher education for the promotion of both the emotional and creativity dispositions and self-awareness, by combining three basic psychological processes (emotion, cognition, and motivation). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
16 pages, 876 KiB  
Article
The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Anxiety Disorders. A Systematic Meta-Review
by Ascensión Fumero, Wenceslao Peñate, Cristián Oyanadel and Bárbara Porter
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 704-719; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030052 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 12503
Abstract
Objective: There has been a growing interest in the study of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs). Many clinical trials and experimental designs have been implemented, with different samples and diverse MBI procedures. Reviews have shown unclear results, apart from a tendency to [...] Read more.
Objective: There has been a growing interest in the study of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs). Many clinical trials and experimental designs have been implemented, with different samples and diverse MBI procedures. Reviews have shown unclear results, apart from a tendency to identify low-to-moderate effectiveness. The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of MBIs on anxiety complaints, analyzing available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Method: The literature search was done in MEDLINE (PubMed) and PsycINFO, from the first available review in 2003 until March 2020. From 82 initial references, 12 reviews were selected. Results: Reviews confirmed a moderate effect size of MBIs in improving anxiety symptoms. This efficacy was similar to that of well-established therapies for reducing anxiety symptoms, such as cognitive behavioral therapies. A large effect size was found when well-developed MBI protocols were applied. Discussion: More refined clinical trials are needed to establish clear conditions of MBI effectiveness (protocols, samples, psychological mechanisms, etc.). In addition, considering mindfulness processes, new outcome measures are needed (such as acceptance, self-awareness, or well-being) to test the incremental value of MBIs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
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