New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 24350

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute for Geography Education, University of Cologne, Gronewaldstr. 2, 50931 Cologne, Germany
Interests: argumentation; intercultural learning; political education; digital media; language-sensitive geography teaching

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geography education is as topical and relevant as ever. It deals with central issues of the future, such as climate change, migration and sustainable urban development. Pupils learn spatial thinking and how to use (digital) media. The subject also makes a central contribution to political education, as controversial positions of different actors are dealt with and students have the opportunity to form their own opinions.

Research in geography education should contribute to the generation of knowledge about the learning of geography and the effective teaching of competencies. Therefore, a Special Issue will be published dedicated to innovative research fields in geography education. Empirical contributions that incorporate the international state of research and generate new insights are to be published with priority. They can relate to different topics. This concerns, for example:

  • The teaching of content-related topics;
  • Education for sustainable development;
  • Learner perceptions;
  • Argumentation in geography classes;
  • The use of digital media in geography lessons;
  • Intercultural learning;
  • Political education in geography lessons.

Prof. Dr. Alexandra Budke
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geography education
  • spatial thinking
  • digital media
  • argumentation
  • education for sustainable development

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 15261 KiB  
Article
Spatial Variation in Educational Quality in Colombia Based on the Phenomena of Agglomeration and Academic Segregation
by Geovanny Castro-Aristizabal, Gregorio Giménez-Esteban, David Arango-Londoño, Esteban Moreno-Cediel and Maribel Castillo-Caicedo
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(8), 1006-1020; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12080072 - 5 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2036
Abstract
This study seeks to measure the degree of agglomeration of educational quality in Colombia, based on the nonsocialization of the population that exhibits low educational quality, with the population that exhibits high educational quality, and thus determine how such agglomeration affects the phenomenon [...] Read more.
This study seeks to measure the degree of agglomeration of educational quality in Colombia, based on the nonsocialization of the population that exhibits low educational quality, with the population that exhibits high educational quality, and thus determine how such agglomeration affects the phenomenon of academic segregation. To this end, we perform a spatial analysis of the educational quality in Colombia and of variables that may influence the phenomenon of educational agglomeration. The level of agglomeration in educational quality in Colombia is demonstrated by the calculation of the Moran’s Index, in which a result of 0.62 was obtained. High educational quality is concentrated in the Andean region, while low educational quality is agglomerated in the periphery of the country, in areas such as the Pacific region. A spatial regression model was carried out to measure the dependence of municipalities on their neighbors, and to determine the main socio-economic factors affecting the phenomenon of educational agglomeration in Colombia, finding that living conditions, unsatisfied basic needs and fiscal transparency all have an impact on the educational quality of the municipalities. It is also found that the number of homicides in the municipalities does not seem to have a significant relationship with education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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27 pages, 1466 KiB  
Article
Metacognition in Argumentative Writing Based on Multiple Sources in Geography Education
by Diana Gebele, Alexandra L. Zepter, Pia Königs and Alexandra Budke
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(8), 948-974; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12080069 - 1 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2194
Abstract
This paper addresses questions about the use of metacognitive strategies in argumentative writing based on multiple sources and the influence of this use on the quality of student texts. For this purpose, think-aloud protocols and texts from a research project on material-supported argumentative [...] Read more.
This paper addresses questions about the use of metacognitive strategies in argumentative writing based on multiple sources and the influence of this use on the quality of student texts. For this purpose, think-aloud protocols and texts from a research project on material-supported argumentative writing in 8th grade geography lessons are analyzed and discussed. The analysis is based on a model of metacognition in argumentative writing using multiple sources, which we also propose in this paper. The results show that the use of metacognitive strategies is a challenge for the investigated target group but that their use, in particular the deployment of goal-setting strategies and planning strategies, enables students to write better texts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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18 pages, 2164 KiB  
Article
Self-Assessment of Students of Geography Education and Primary Social and Science Teaching towards the Use of Digital (Geo-) Media for Written and Oral Argumentation
by Sebastian Wolff-Seidel and Alexandra Budke
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(6), 516-533; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12060038 - 25 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2107
Abstract
This article discusses possible challenges and potentials in the use of digital geomedia in the context of written and oral argumentation in higher education by examining the perspectives of students and lecturers, especially for the subjects of geography in general and primary school [...] Read more.
This article discusses possible challenges and potentials in the use of digital geomedia in the context of written and oral argumentation in higher education by examining the perspectives of students and lecturers, especially for the subjects of geography in general and primary school science. To this end, potentials and challenges, as well as competences that have to be promoted among pupils and students in dealing with digital geomedia in the context of written and oral argumentation are first discussed. In the following, we present the results of a mixed methods approach in which we surveyed student teachers with a questionnaire (n = 150) on the one hand and, on the other hand, reflected their view of the issue by analysing qualitative expert interviews (n = 17) with lecturers who teach at the same universities in the corresponding degree programmes. In this way we contextualise the student’s self-assessment in the respective location’s teacher training. Our results show that there is a high degree of commonality between lecturers and students with regard to the importance of argumentation with digital geomedia. At the same time, the assessment of the students’ abilities differs greatly; most students feel capable of dealing with these topics, while lecturers see deficits here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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16 pages, 1028 KiB  
Article
“[Culture] Makes Each Country Unique, It’s Kind of like a Trademark.” Empirical Results on Students’ Perceptions of Culture and Space as Learning Prerequisite for Geography Lessons
by Ronja Ege and Alexandra Budke
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(2), 98-113; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12020009 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2984
Abstract
Students’ everyday perceptions of culture and space have a significant impact on their social coexistence and should, therefore, be considered in geography lessons. The other or foreign is often negatively assessed. This perception is based on an essentialist understanding of cultural space but [...] Read more.
Students’ everyday perceptions of culture and space have a significant impact on their social coexistence and should, therefore, be considered in geography lessons. The other or foreign is often negatively assessed. This perception is based on an essentialist understanding of cultural space but is inappropriate for a culturally diverse world. The concept of transculturality by Wolfgang Welsch offers a constructivist perspective on culture and space, which takes cultural globalization into account and avoids a stereotyped division of cultures. To prevent xenophobia, it is important to understand the everyday ideas about culture and space younger generations possess and the extent to which transculturality is integrated. The learning requirements of students provide a basis on which geography lessons can be developed that incorporate these concepts to counteract xenophobia. To determine everyday perceptions, 197 German 9th-grade students were asked. The selection of the sample was based on a declaration of consent from the parents and was not fully probabilistic. In addition to a preliminary study, 98 female and 99 male students were surveyed in a written questionnaire. The data analysis was realized in a mixed-method design, with qualitative content analysis and supplementary quantifications. The results of which suggested that culture and space are predominantly understood as nationally specific. Consequently, a transcultural understanding should be incorporated long-term into geography lessons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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17 pages, 1699 KiB  
Article
Higher Order Thinking by Setting and Debriefing Tasks in Dutch Geography Lessons
by Uwe Krause, Tine Béneker and Jan van Tartwijk
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(1), 11-27; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12010002 - 30 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2642 | Correction
Abstract
Tasks are a powerful instrument for geography teachers, as they let students engage with the subject. To advance the cumulative learning of students, teachers have to make sure that students learn how to deal with complex and abstract knowledge structures. In the Netherlands, [...] Read more.
Tasks are a powerful instrument for geography teachers, as they let students engage with the subject. To advance the cumulative learning of students, teachers have to make sure that students learn how to deal with complex and abstract knowledge structures. In the Netherlands, teachers face a dilemma when it comes to task setting: the intended curriculum aims for a considerable part at (parts of) higher order thinking, whereas the high-stakes exams have a clear focus on the use of thinking strategies. This paper explores the task setting and debriefing of Dutch geography teachers by analyzing twenty-three videotaped lessons in upper secondary education by using the Geography Task Categorization Framework. The results show that Dutch teachers mostly rely on textbooks when setting tasks. The focus lies on reproduction and the use of thinking strategies. Tasks aiming at (parts of) higher order thinking are barely used. Furthermore, teachers use tasks from previous high-stakes exams already used in an early stage of upper secondary education. In the debriefing of tasks, teachers move from simple and concrete to complex and abstract knowledge and vice versa. However, most of these movements aim at simplifying knowledge structures. In the observed lessons, curriculum aims at the level of (parts of) higher order thinking are not achieved. The evaluative rules as set by the high-stakes exams and the type of tasks offered by textbooks seem to be dominant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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17 pages, 1739 KiB  
Article
Multiperspectivity as a Process of Understanding and Reflection: Introduction to a Model for Perspective-Taking in Geography Education
by Dina Vasiljuk and Alexandra Budke
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 529-545; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020038 - 10 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 7094
Abstract
Perspective-taking is an essential competency because it enables a better understanding of complex issues or conflicts with various actors and different points of view involved. However, no competency model for perspective-taking has been provided in geography education to date, which is why a [...] Read more.
Perspective-taking is an essential competency because it enables a better understanding of complex issues or conflicts with various actors and different points of view involved. However, no competency model for perspective-taking has been provided in geography education to date, which is why a respective model was developed in this study. The model was then applied by analysing 28 articles from four practice journals of geography education from German-speaking countries. This analysis focused on the dimensions of the perspective-taking competencies that were required by respective tasks within the lesson concepts. The results show that the tasks hardly promoted competence-oriented geography teaching in terms of perspective-taking. Therefore, the competency model could be a suitable tool for analysing and developing teaching materials that implement perspective-taking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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23 pages, 4168 KiB  
Article
Metacognitive Strategies for Developing Complex Geographical Causal Structures—An Interventional Study in the Geography Classroom
by Johannes Heuzeroth and Alexandra Budke
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 382-404; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020029 - 7 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3323
Abstract
This article examines the impact of applied metacognition on the development of geographical causal structures by students in the geography classroom. For that, three different metacognitive strategies were designed: a. action plan, activating meta-knowledge prior to problem-solving and simultaneously visualizing action steps for [...] Read more.
This article examines the impact of applied metacognition on the development of geographical causal structures by students in the geography classroom. For that, three different metacognitive strategies were designed: a. action plan, activating meta-knowledge prior to problem-solving and simultaneously visualizing action steps for dealing with the task (A); b. circular thinking (C), a loop-like, question-guided procedure applied during the problem-solving process that supports and controls content-related and linguistic cognition processes; c. reflexion (R), aiming at evaluating the effectivity and efficiency of applied problem-solving heuristics after the problem-solving process and developing strategies for dealing with future tasks. These strategies were statistically tested and assessed as to their effectiveness on the development of complex geographical causal structures via a quasi-experimental pre-posttest design. It can be shown that metacognitive strategies strongly affect students’ creation of causal structures, which depict a multitude of elements and relations at a high degree of interconnectedness, thus enabling a contentually and linguistically coherent representation of system-specific properties of the human–environment system. On the basis of the discussion of the results, it will be demonstrated that metacognitive strategies can provide a significant contribution to initiating systemic thinking-competences and what the implications might be on planning and teaching geography lessons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in the Teaching and Learning of Geography)
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