Special Issue "Ecological Stoichiometry for Aquatic Ecosystem Studies"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alan D. Christian
Website
Guest Editor
University of Massachusetts Boston, School for the Environment, United States
Interests: freshwater ecology; conservation; freshwater macroinvertebrates; freshwater mussels; conservation genetics; restoration ecology; ecological stoichiometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecological Stoichiometry, the balance of multiple chemical elements and energy in ecological interactions, has a long history going back to the 1950s and a resurrection of sorts in the 1980s. From that point on, ecological stoichiometry has gained widespread recognition as an underlying framework in ecology, particularly, aquatic ecosystem ecology. Within that framework, ecological stoichiometry ranges the scales of atoms, molecules, individuals, communities, ecosystems, and the globe and is related to resources, body composition, and homoeostasis of autotropic and heterotrophic organisms. This Special Issue on Ecological Stoichiometry for Aquatic Ecosystems Studies wishes to address the breadth of the application of ecological stoichiometry to all types of ecological and evolutionary questions in aquatic systems as well as highlight recent advances in the field of aquatic ecological stoichiometry.

Dr. Alan D. Christian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ecological stoichiometry
  • Biogeochemistry
  • Nutrient cycling
  • Consumer-driven nutrient recycling
  • Carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, C/N/P ratio
  • C/N ratio, C/P ratio, N/P ratio
  • Autotrophs
  • Heterotrophs
  • Growth
  • Homeostasis
  • Food quality
  • Elemental composition
  • Excretion
  • Feces
  • Pseudofeces

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Trophic Trait Evolution Explains Variation in Nutrient Excretion Stoichiometry among Panamanian Armored Catfishes (Loricariidae)
Diversity 2019, 11(6), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11060088 - 05 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Variation in nutrient excretion rates and stoichiometric ratios (e.g., nitrogen to phosphorus) by consumers can have substantial effects on aquatic ecosystem function. While phylogenetic signals within an assemblage often explain variation in nutrient recycling rates and stoichiometry, the phylogenetically conserved traits that underlie [...] Read more.
Variation in nutrient excretion rates and stoichiometric ratios (e.g., nitrogen to phosphorus) by consumers can have substantial effects on aquatic ecosystem function. While phylogenetic signals within an assemblage often explain variation in nutrient recycling rates and stoichiometry, the phylogenetically conserved traits that underlie this phenomenon remain unclear. In particular, variation in nutrient excretion stoichiometry across a phylogeny might be driven by phylogenetic patterns in either diet or body stoichiometry. We examined the relative importance of these traits in explaining variation in nutrient recycling rates and stoichiometry in a diverse family of Neotropical-armored catfishes, Loricariidae, in Panamanian streams. We found significant variation in nutrient mineralization traits among species and subfamilies, but variation in nutrient excretion stoichiometry among species was best explained by trophic position rather than body stoichiometry. The variation in trophic position among Panamanian species was consistent with variation in the trophic niche of their genera across South America, suggesting that phylogenetic patterns underpin the evolution of trophic and nutrient excretion traits among these species. Such geographical variation in nutrient mineralization patterns among closely related species may be common, given that trophic variation in fish lineages occurs widely. These results suggest that information on trophic trait evolution within lineages will advance our understanding of the functional contribution of animals to biogeochemical cycling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Stoichiometry for Aquatic Ecosystem Studies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Egestion Versus Excretion: A Meta-Analysis Examining Nutrient Release Rates and Ratios across Freshwater Fauna
Diversity 2019, 11(10), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11100189 - 03 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
In aquatic settings, animals directly affect ecosystem functions through excretion of dissolved nutrients. However, the comparative role of egestion as an animal-mediated nutrient flux remains understudied. We conducted a literature survey and meta-analysis to directly compare nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and N:P of [...] Read more.
In aquatic settings, animals directly affect ecosystem functions through excretion of dissolved nutrients. However, the comparative role of egestion as an animal-mediated nutrient flux remains understudied. We conducted a literature survey and meta-analysis to directly compare nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and N:P of egestion compared to excretion rates and ratios across freshwater animals. Synthesizing 215 datasets across 47 animal species (all primary consumers or omnivores), we show that the total N and P egestion rates exceed inorganic N and P excretion rates but not total N and P excretion rates, and that proportions of P egested compared to excreted depend on body size and animal phylum. We further show that variance of egestion rates is often greater than excretion rates, reflecting greater inter-individual and temporal variation of egestion as a nutrient flux in comparison to excretion. At phylogenetic levels, our analysis suggests that Mollusca exhibit the greatest rates and variance of P egestion relative to excretion, especially compared to Arthropoda. Given quantitative evidence of egestion as a dominant and dynamic animal-mediated nutrient flux, our synthesis demonstrates the need for additional studies of rates, stoichiometry, and roles of animal egestion in aquatic settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Stoichiometry for Aquatic Ecosystem Studies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop