Special Issue "Conservation Biology of Vascular Plants"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Adriano Stinca
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Caserta, Italy
Interests: floristics; plant taxonomy; vegetation science; community ecology; plant biology; biogeography; fire ecology; biodeteriogenic plants on monuments and archaeological sites; plant biodiversity assessment and conservation
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Vascular plants, i.e. plants with a vascular system containing xylem and phloem, with nearly 400,000 species and subspecies currently known, provide crucial primary production and vital socioeconomic and environmental services (e.g., soil and water conservation). However, the diversity of vascular plants is very unevenly distributed and subjected to many threats across the globe. Habitat loss, direct exploitation, indirect human influence through changing local ecological interactions (e.g., invasion of non-native plants), natural disasters, pollution, and intrinsic factors (e.g., unfavorable species traits) have been listed among the main threats for plant conservation. Therefore, one of the most critical issues on the global agenda is the need to preserve native plant biodiversity for future generations.

This Special Issue will focus on interdisciplinary new research and significant advances in conservation biology of vascular plants. Authors are encouraged to submit their manuscripts on the following topics:

- Diversity and distribution of rare vascular plants;

- Human influence (e.g., land use change, pollution, invasion of alien species, fire, tourism) on vascular plant conservation;

- Natural disaster influence (e.g., volcanic eruptions, tsunamis) on vascular plant conservation;

- In situ and ex situ conservation actions to vascular plants, including reintroduction and restocking actions;

- In vitro propagation (e.g., seed germination, micropropagation) experiences for vascular plants;

- Early warning and modeling of threats to vascular plants;

- Conservation policies (e.g., communication, education, and public awareness programmes) to conserve vascular plants.

Dr. Adriano Stinca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anthropogenic disturbances
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Red lists
  • Threatened species
  • Vascular plants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Serotiny in Primula palinuri: How to Face the Dry Season on Mediterranean Cliffs
Diversity 2020, 12(8), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080291 - 25 Jul 2020
Abstract
Primula palinuri Petagna is the only Mediterranean and maritime species in the genus Primula, is endemic to coastal cliffs of southern Italy, and is classified as endangered with a decreasing population trend in the IUCN Red List. For this species, the major [...] Read more.
Primula palinuri Petagna is the only Mediterranean and maritime species in the genus Primula, is endemic to coastal cliffs of southern Italy, and is classified as endangered with a decreasing population trend in the IUCN Red List. For this species, the major bottleneck for long-term survival has been recognized to be recruitment failure. In this study, we investigated the seed release strategy of P. palinuri, by using field observations and laboratory experiments. We hypothesized that repetitive cycles of wet/dry conditions and external wax removal could be the environmental triggers of capsule dehiscence. Data showed that capsules treated with wet/dry cycles dehisced within 75 days, while none subjected to constant dry conditions dehisced. Once dehisced, capsules repetitively closed when made wet, and opened again upon drying. Seeds of P. palinuri can remain on plant up to 2 years, over which time capsules reclose when rained upon and reopen upon drying, highlighting the first reported occurrence of serotiny in a Primula species. Serotiny allows P. palinuri to face the dry season, by avoiding capsule dehiscence during the summer dry period and delaying seed release until the beginning of fall, when water availability in the soil is generally no longer a limiting factor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation Biology of Vascular Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring of Plant Species and Communities on Coastal Cliffs: Is the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Suitable?
Diversity 2020, 12(4), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12040149 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cliffs are reservoirs of biodiversity; therefore, many plant species and communities of inland and coastal cliffs are protected by Council Directive 92/43/EEC (European Economic Community), and their monitoring is mandatory in European Union countries. Surveying plants on coastal cliff by traditional methods is [...] Read more.
Cliffs are reservoirs of biodiversity; therefore, many plant species and communities of inland and coastal cliffs are protected by Council Directive 92/43/EEC (European Economic Community), and their monitoring is mandatory in European Union countries. Surveying plants on coastal cliff by traditional methods is challenging and alternatives are needed. We tested the use of a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) as an alternative survey tool, gathering aerial images of cliffs at Palinuro Cape (Southern Italy). Four photo-interpreters analysed independently the derived orthomosaic and plotted data needed for the monitoring activity. Data showed to be not affected by photo-interpreters and reliable for the prescribed monitoring in the European Union (EU). Using the GIS analysis tools, we were able to: (a) recognise and map the plant species, (b) derive and measure the area of distribution on the cliff of habitat and species, and (c) count Eokochia saxicola individuals and gather quantitative data on their projected area. Quality of the images represented the main constraint, but incoming technological improvements of sensors and UAVs may overcome this problem. Overall results support the use of UAVs as an affordable and fast survey technique that can rapidly increase the number of studies on cliff habitats and improve ecological knowledge on their plant species and communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conservation Biology of Vascular Plants)
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