Special Issue "Aquatic Environmental Monitoring and Assessment"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Michelle Gray

Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management & Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: environmental assessment; environmental monitoring; freshwater ecology; water quality; fish health; invertebrate community response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of aquatic environmental monitoring and assessment has experienced many changes and advancements over recent decades. These range from shifts in study design to more adaptive approaches, to the advancement of genetic tools and techniques to assess presence/absence, and to diversity. With continued threats to freshwater and marine ecosystem functions and ecosystem services from habitat modification and destruction, pollution, population decline, invasive species, and climate change, this Special Issue will provide a stage upon which basic and applied research in aquatic monitoring and assessment can apply new approaches and techniques to address the challenges of aquatic monitoring across variable spatial and temporal scales to address the topics listed above.

Dr. Michelle Gray
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Utility of Condition Indices as Predictors of Lipid Content in Slimy Sculpin (Cottus cognatus)
Diversity 2019, 11(5), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11050071
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 25 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
PDF Full-text (944 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) are increasingly being used as indicator species. This has primarily entailed measuring their condition, the assumption being that condition can be used as a surrogate for lipid content. While there is evidence to suggest this assumption is [...] Read more.
Slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) are increasingly being used as indicator species. This has primarily entailed measuring their condition, the assumption being that condition can be used as a surrogate for lipid content. While there is evidence to suggest this assumption is applicable to some fish, it has yet to be validated for C. cognatus. Further, there are several means by which one may calculate condition, the most commonly employed of which are indirect measurements of lipid content (namely, Fulton’s K, somatic K (Ks), and Le Cren’s relative condition factor (Kn)). We compared the ability of each of these morphometric indices to predict whole-body lipid content in C. cognatus. There was a moderate degree of evidence that Fulton’s K, Ks, and Kn are reliable predictors (Ks and Kn in particular). Of the latter we recommend Kn be used because, unlike Ks, it does not require that fish be killed. And while Fulton’s K did not perform quite as well, we consider it a sufficient substitute if the data necessary to calculate Kn are unavailable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Environmental Monitoring and Assessment)
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