Special Issue "Application of Environmental DNA for Biological Conservation"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alexis Janosik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of West Florida, Department of Biology, Pensacola, United States

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental DNA is a non-invasive tool used for the detection of rare, hard-to-find, invasive, and endangered species in aquatic habitats. When traditional methods are difficult, prove to be inadequate, and/or organisms are found in low densities, eDNA can provide resolution. Specifically, organisms in aquatic environments leave a trace of slime, scales, urine, feces, and gametes they slide through the water. Water is collected, DNA is extracted, and the sample is used to determine if the target species is present. Thus, eDNA can be used to "take attendance", as a monitoring tool, and for conservation purposes.

This Special Issue provides the opportunity to highlight new and exciting research using eDNA, as well as emphasize technological advances using this tool.

Dr. Alexis Janosik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental DNA
  • eDNA
  • Detection
  • Conservation
  • Monitoring
  • Biodiversity
  • Metabarcoding

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Metabarcoding of Environmental DNA Samples to Explore the Use of Uranium Mine Containment Ponds as a Water Source for Wildlife
Diversity 2017, 9(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/d9040054 - 21 Nov 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Understanding how anthropogenic impacts on the landscape affect wildlife requires a knowledge of community assemblages. Species surveys are the first step in assessing community structure, and recent molecular applications such as metabarcoding and environmental DNA analyses have been proposed as an additional and [...] Read more.
Understanding how anthropogenic impacts on the landscape affect wildlife requires a knowledge of community assemblages. Species surveys are the first step in assessing community structure, and recent molecular applications such as metabarcoding and environmental DNA analyses have been proposed as an additional and complementary wildlife survey method. Here, we test eDNA metabarcoding as a survey tool to examine the potential use of uranium mine containment ponds as water sources by wildlife. We tested samples from surface water near mines and from one mine containment pond using two markers, 12S and 16S rRNA gene amplicons, to survey for vertebrate species. We recovered large numbers of sequence reads from taxa expected to be in the area and from less common or hard to observe taxa such as the tiger salamander and gray fox. Detection of these two species is of note because they were not observed in a previous species assessment, and tiger salamander DNA was found in the mine containment pond sample. We also found that sample concentration by centrifugation was a more efficient and more feasible method than filtration in these highly turbid surface waters. Ultimately, the use of eDNA metabarcoding could allow for a better understanding of the area’s overall biodiversity and community composition as well as aid current ecotoxicological risk assessment work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Environmental DNA for Biological Conservation)
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Open AccessArticle
An eDNA-Based SNP Assay for Ungulate Species and Sex Identification
Diversity 2017, 9(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/d9030033 - 22 Aug 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Many processes in wild populations are difficult to study. Genetic data, often non-invasively collected, may provide a solution to these difficulties and are increasingly used to study behavioral, demographic, ecological, and evolutionary processes. Moreover, the improved sensitivity of genetic methods now allows analyses [...] Read more.
Many processes in wild populations are difficult to study. Genetic data, often non-invasively collected, may provide a solution to these difficulties and are increasingly used to study behavioral, demographic, ecological, and evolutionary processes. Moreover, the improved sensitivity of genetic methods now allows analyses of trace amounts of DNA left by animals in their environment (e.g., saliva, urine, epithelial cells). Environmental DNA (eDNA) thus offers new opportunities to study a range of historic and contemporary questions. Here, we present a species and sex diagnostic kit for studying browsing in a multispecies temperate ungulate assemblage. Using mitochondrial sequences deposited in Genbank, we developed four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for identifying four temperate ungulate species. We also sequenced portions of the Amelogenin gene on the X- and Y-chromosomes and developed six SNPs (three on the X-chromosome and three on the Y-chromosome) for sex determination. We tested the SNP assays on high and low quality/quantity DNA samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Environmental DNA for Biological Conservation)
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