Gender Difference in Diabetes 2.0 Edition

A special issue of Diabetology (ISSN 2673-4540).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2948

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
ASSL Olbia, Via Bazzoni-Sircana 2, 07026 Olbia, Italy
Interests: hypertension; diabetes complications; cardiovascular system; metabolic syndrome; clinical nutrition; diabetes; cardiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am glad to inform you that the second Congress on Gender Medicine will be held in Olbia, Italy, on 21 and 22 April 2023; we will discuss the various medical, social, ethnic, and psychological aspects of gender differences, trying to obtain as broad a picture as possible as to how these differences are present and evident in diabetic disease. We will also try to identify the still-unclear points that deserve further studies. As the Guest Editor of this Special Issue of Diabetology, I am inviting you to submit an article/review on the topic that you will present at the meeting. The instructions on how to proceed with writing will be available on a dedicated web page which I will send you shortly. The official deadline for submitting the paper will be 30 September 2023, but it can be done after the end of the meeting. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you again for agreeing to attend the meeting that we will have in April, and I hope that you will accept this invitation to prepare a paper.

I look forward to seeing you in Olbia!

Prof. Dr. Giancarlo Tonolo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diabetology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition
  • technology
  • sexuality
  • psychology
  • psychiatry
  • ethnic
  • anthropology
  • drug therapy
  • microvascular complications
  • macrovascular complications
  • cardiovascular

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 3075 KiB  
Communication
Advanced Technology (Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Advanced Hybrid Closed-Loop Systems) in Diabetes from the Perspective of Gender Differences
by Maria Grazia Nuzzo and Marciano Schettino
Diabetology 2023, 4(4), 519-526; https://doi.org/10.3390/diabetology4040045 - 13 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1597
Abstract
An ever-growing body of evidence suggests that sex and gender influence the pathophysiology, incidence, prevalence, clinical manifestations, course, and response to therapy of diabetes. Sex and gender differences are particularly evident in type 1 diabetes, especially in patients using advanced technologies (CGM and [...] Read more.
An ever-growing body of evidence suggests that sex and gender influence the pathophysiology, incidence, prevalence, clinical manifestations, course, and response to therapy of diabetes. Sex and gender differences are particularly evident in type 1 diabetes, especially in patients using advanced technologies (CGM and AHCL), as they are factors that interact with each other and have an impact on adherence to therapy, which affects not only metabolic compensation, but also, therefore, the prevention of complications and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Difference in Diabetes 2.0 Edition)
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9 pages, 388 KiB  
Article
Exploring Diabetic Retinopathy Patterns in Saudi Arabia: Gender and Diabetes Type Comparison
by Samraa Hussain and Naji AlJohani
Diabetology 2023, 4(4), 490-498; https://doi.org/10.3390/diabetology4040042 - 7 Nov 2023
Viewed by 870
Abstract
Aims: To determine the prevalence and predictors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Saudi males and females with diabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 507 patients with diabetes between May and August 2018. The data extracted from patients’ records included demographic and [...] Read more.
Aims: To determine the prevalence and predictors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Saudi males and females with diabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 507 patients with diabetes between May and August 2018. The data extracted from patients’ records included demographic and clinical information and laboratory investigations. The retinopathy data were based on fundus photography graded into five categories: no DR, NPDR, MNPDR, SNPDR, and PDR. Results: The patients’ mean age was 47.3 years, the majority (59.3%) being female and T2DM being the most common type (52.4%). The prevalence of no DR was 51.4%; NPDR, 4.4%; MNPDR, 7.7%; SNPDR, 3.7%; and PDR, 5.1%. The duration of DM, as well as the severity of hypertension and neuropathy values rose significantly as DR progressed, underlining the pivotal role of hyperglycemia as the primary driver of diabetic complications. The odds ratio for the presence of hypertension was 1.8 (95% CI 0.9–3.5); hypertension showed the highest risk of DR. Stratification according to gender showed a significantly higher DR risk in females than males. Interestingly, nephropathy played a significant role in the DR risk in T1DM. Conclusions: Among T1DM and T2DM patients, the severity of DR is associated with risk factors including the DM duration, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and neuropathy. The impact of these factors varies with gender and diabetes type. Therefore, the severity of DR could define patients at a high risk of macro/microvascular complications and enable earlier interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality among T1DM and T2DM patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Difference in Diabetes 2.0 Edition)
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