Special Issue "Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing"

A special issue of Designs (ISSN 2411-9660).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mika Salmi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Aalto University, Finland
Interests: digital and advanced manufacturing; additive manufacturing (AM); rapid manufacturing; 3D modeling
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The additive manufacturing (AM) business has grown in double digits in past years. The development of new materials and equipment has opened up new application possibilities, and equipment is quicker and cheaper using the new materials launched by vendors and material developers. AM has become more important for industry, but also for academics. Since AM offers more design freedom than any other manufacturing process, it provides designers with a new challenge to design better and more efficient products.

The objective of this Special Issue is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange their latest achievements and to identify critical issues and challenges for future investigations of the design and applications of additive manufacturing.

Dr. Mika Salmi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Designs is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Design for additive manufacturing
  • Industrial applications of additive manufacturing
  • Medical applications of additive manufacturing
  • AM materials and equipment development
  • AM processes
  • Topology optimization

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Establishing Flow Stress and Elongation Relationships as a Function of Microstructural Features of Ti6Al4V Alloy Processed using SLM
Designs 2019, 3(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs3020021 - 13 Apr 2019
Abstract
Selective laser melting (SLM) is an attractive technology for fabricating complex metal parts with reduced number of processing steps compared to traditional manufacturing technologies. The main challenge in its adoption is the variability in mechanical property produced through this process. Control and understanding [...] Read more.
Selective laser melting (SLM) is an attractive technology for fabricating complex metal parts with reduced number of processing steps compared to traditional manufacturing technologies. The main challenge in its adoption is the variability in mechanical property produced through this process. Control and understanding of microstructural features affected by the SLM process is the key for achieving desirable mechanical properties. Numerous studies have been published related to microstructure and mechanical properties of SLM printed parts; however, few of those reported end-to-end process–structure–property relationship. Therefore, the current study aims to comprehensively present the widespread microstructure information available on SLM processed Ti6Al4V alloy. Furthermore, its effects on the magnitude and anisotropy of the resultant mechanical properties, such as the yield strength and elongation, has been established. A Hall–Petch relationship is established between α lath size and yield strength magnitude for the as-built, heat-treated, transverse, and longitudinal built samples. The anisotropy in flow stress is established using the α lath size and prior β grain orientation. Percentage elongation was identified to be affected by both α lath size and powder layer thickness, due to its correlation with the prior β columnar grain size. A linear relationship was established between percentage elongation and combined size of α lath and powder layer thickness using the rule of mixtures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
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Open AccessArticle
Tetrahedron-Based Porous Scaffold Design for 3D Printing
Designs 2019, 3(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs3010016 - 18 Feb 2019
Abstract
Tissue repairing has been the ultimate goal of surgery, especially with the emergence of reconstructive medicine. A large amount of research devoted to exploring innovative porous scaffold designs, including homogeneous and inhomogeneous ones, have been presented in the literature. The triply periodic minimal [...] Read more.
Tissue repairing has been the ultimate goal of surgery, especially with the emergence of reconstructive medicine. A large amount of research devoted to exploring innovative porous scaffold designs, including homogeneous and inhomogeneous ones, have been presented in the literature. The triply periodic minimal surface has been a versatile source of biomorphic structure design due to its smooth surface and high interconnectivity. Nonetheless, many 3D models are often rendered in the form of triangular meshes for its efficiency and convenience. The requirement of regular hexahedral meshes then becomes one of limitations of the triply periodic minimal surface method. In this paper, we make a successful attempt to generate microscopic pore structures using tetrahedral implicit surfaces. To replace the conventional Cartesian coordinates, a new coordinates system is built based on the perpendicular distances between a point and the tetrahedral faces to capture the periodicity of a tetrahedral implicit surface. Similarly to the triply periodic minimal surface, a variety of tetrahedral implicit surfaces, including P-, D-, and G-surfaces are defined by combinations of trigonometric functions. We further compare triply periodic minimal surfaces with tetrahedral implicit surfaces in terms of shape, porosity, and mean curvature to discuss the similarities and differences of the two surfaces. An example of femur scaffold construction is provided to demonstrate the detailed process of modeling porous architectures using the tetrahedral implicit surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of a New Span-Morphing Wing Core Design
Designs 2019, 3(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs3010012 - 07 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents a new design for the core of a span-morphing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) wing that increases the spanwise length of the wing by fifty percent. The purpose of morphing the wingspan is to increase lift and fuel efficiency during extension, [...] Read more.
This paper presents a new design for the core of a span-morphing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) wing that increases the spanwise length of the wing by fifty percent. The purpose of morphing the wingspan is to increase lift and fuel efficiency during extension, to increase maneuverability during contraction, and to add roll control capability through asymmetrical span morphing. The span morphing is continuous throughout the wing, which is comprised of multiple partitions. Three main components make up the structure of each partition: a zero Poisson’s ratio honeycomb substructure, telescoping carbon fiber spars and a linear actuator. The zero Poisson’s ratio honeycomb substructure is an assembly of rigid internal ribs and flexible chevrons. This innovative multi-part honeycomb design allows the ribs and chevrons to be 3D printed separately from different materials in order to offer different directional stiffness, and to accommodate design iterations and future maintenance. Because of its transverse rigidity and spanwise compliance, the design maintains the airfoil shape and the cross-sectional area during morphing. The telescoping carbon fiber spars interconnect to provide structural support throughout the wing while undergoing morphing. The wing model has been computationally analyzed, manufactured, assembled and experimentally tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
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Open AccessArticle
Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing as an Enabler for Light Weight Flight Hardware
Designs 2018, 2(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs2040051 - 25 Nov 2018
Cited by 11
Abstract
Three case studies utilizing topology optimization and Additive Manufacturing for the development of space flight hardware are described. The Additive Manufacturing (AM) modality that was used in this work is powder bed laser based fusion. The case studies correspond to the redesign and [...] Read more.
Three case studies utilizing topology optimization and Additive Manufacturing for the development of space flight hardware are described. The Additive Manufacturing (AM) modality that was used in this work is powder bed laser based fusion. The case studies correspond to the redesign and manufacture of two heritage parts for a Surrey Satellite Technology LTD (SSTL) Technology Demonstrator Space Mission that are currently functioning in orbit (case studies 1 and 2), and a system of five components for the SpaceIL’s lunar launch vehicle planned for launch in the near future (case study 3). In each case, the nominal or heritage part has undergone topology optimization, incorporating the AM manufacturing constraints that include: minimization of support structures, ability to remove unsintered powder, and minimization of heat transfer jumps that will cause artifact warpage. To this end the topology optimization exercise must be coupled to the Additive Manufacturing build direction, and steps are incorporated to integrate the AM constraints. After design verification by successfully passing a Finite Element Analysis routine, the components have been fabricated and the AM artifacts and in-process testing coupons have undergone verification and qualification testing in order to deliver structural components that are suitable for their respective missions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring an AM-Enabled Combination-of-Functions Approach for Modular Product Design
Designs 2018, 2(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs2040037 - 16 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work explores an additive-manufacturing-enabled combination-of-function approach for design of modular products. AM technologies allow the design and manufacturing of nearly free-form geometry, which can be used to create more complex, multi-function or multi-feature parts. The approach presented here replaces sub-assemblies within a [...] Read more.
This work explores an additive-manufacturing-enabled combination-of-function approach for design of modular products. AM technologies allow the design and manufacturing of nearly free-form geometry, which can be used to create more complex, multi-function or multi-feature parts. The approach presented here replaces sub-assemblies within a modular product or system with more complex consolidated parts that are designed and manufactured using AM technologies. This approach can increase the reliability of systems and products by reducing the number of interfaces, as well as allowing the optimization of the more complex parts during the design. The smaller part count and the ability of users to replace or upgrade the system or product parts on-demand should reduce user risk, life-cycle costs, and prevent obsolescence for the user of many systems. This study presents a detailed review on the current state-of-the-art in modular product design in order to demonstrate the place, need and usefulness of this AM-enabled method for systems and products that could benefit from it. A detailed case study is developed and presented to illustrate the concepts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
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