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Open AccessArticle

Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing as an Enabler for Light Weight Flight Hardware

1
Morf3D Inc., El Segundo, CA 90245, USA
2
Ruag Space, 8052 Zürich, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Designs 2018, 2(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/designs2040051
Received: 24 September 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 19 November 2018 / Published: 25 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing)
Three case studies utilizing topology optimization and Additive Manufacturing for the development of space flight hardware are described. The Additive Manufacturing (AM) modality that was used in this work is powder bed laser based fusion. The case studies correspond to the redesign and manufacture of two heritage parts for a Surrey Satellite Technology LTD (SSTL) Technology Demonstrator Space Mission that are currently functioning in orbit (case studies 1 and 2), and a system of five components for the SpaceIL’s lunar launch vehicle planned for launch in the near future (case study 3). In each case, the nominal or heritage part has undergone topology optimization, incorporating the AM manufacturing constraints that include: minimization of support structures, ability to remove unsintered powder, and minimization of heat transfer jumps that will cause artifact warpage. To this end the topology optimization exercise must be coupled to the Additive Manufacturing build direction, and steps are incorporated to integrate the AM constraints. After design verification by successfully passing a Finite Element Analysis routine, the components have been fabricated and the AM artifacts and in-process testing coupons have undergone verification and qualification testing in order to deliver structural components that are suitable for their respective missions. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; topology optimization; design for additive manufacturing; 3D printing; aerospace; full-life cycle manufacturing flow additive manufacturing; topology optimization; design for additive manufacturing; 3D printing; aerospace; full-life cycle manufacturing flow
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MDPI and ACS Style

Orme, M.; Madera, I.; Gschweitl, M.; Ferrari, M. Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing as an Enabler for Light Weight Flight Hardware. Designs 2018, 2, 51.

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