Special Issue "Feature Papers"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dr. Claude Jaquiéry

Department of Cranio—Maxillofacial Surgery and Hightech Research Center of CMF—Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Spitalstrasse 21, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0041 61 328 72 33
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Patrick R. Schmidlin

Center of Dental Medicine, Clinic of Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology, University of Zurich, Plattenstrasse 11, CH-8032 Zürich, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +41 44 634 34 17
Fax: +41 44 634 43 08
Interests: dental implant; periodontitis; guided tissue regeneration; adhesive dentistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is a Special Issue of high quality papers in Open Access form by the editorial board members, or those invited by the editorial office and the Editor-in-Chief. The scope of the Dentistry Journal includes, but is not limited to, the following items:

  • Clinical outcomes of dental treatment
  • Clinical outcomes of surgical treatment
  • The study, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders and conditions of the oral cavity and the head and neck area
  • Dentition and related structures and tissues, particularly in the maxillofacial (jaw and facial) area
  • Medical related problems in dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery

 

Prof. Dr. Claude Jaquiéry
Prof. Dr. Patrick R. Schmidlin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Qualitative Evaluation of Clinical Audit in UK Dental Foundation Training
Dent. J. 2017, 5(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5040031
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 31 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 10 November 2017
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Abstract
Clinical Audit (CA) has been recognized as a useful tool for tool for improving service delivery, clinical governance, and the education and performance of the dental team. This study develops the discussion by investigating its use as an educational tool within UK Dental [...] Read more.
Clinical Audit (CA) has been recognized as a useful tool for tool for improving service delivery, clinical governance, and the education and performance of the dental team. This study develops the discussion by investigating its use as an educational tool within UK Dental Foundation Training (DFT). The aim was to investigate the views of Foundation Dentists (FDs) and Training Programme Directors (TPDs) on the CA module in their FD training schemes, to provide insight and recommendations for those supervising and undertaking CA. A literature review was conducted followed by a qualitative research methodology, using group interviews. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analyzed using NVIVO, a Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis tool. CA was found to be a useful tool for teaching management and professionalism and can bring some improvement to clinical practice, but TPDs have doubts about the long-term effects on service delivery. The role of the Educational Supervisor (ES) is discussed and recommendations are given for those supervising and conducting CA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Should Undergraduate Lectures be Compulsory? The Views of Dental and Medical Students from a UK University
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020015
Received: 31 December 2016 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2228 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Formal lectures have been a traditional part of medical and dental education, but there is debate as to their compulsory status. This study was designed to explore dental and medical students’ views on compulsory lectures and the use of Video-Recorded Lectures (VRL). A [...] Read more.
Formal lectures have been a traditional part of medical and dental education, but there is debate as to their compulsory status. This study was designed to explore dental and medical students’ views on compulsory lectures and the use of Video-Recorded Lectures (VRL). A cross-sectional study of University of Bristol students in Years 2 to 4 was conducted using an online questionnaire. The majority of both dental (76%) and medical (66%) students felt lectures should be non-compulsory. The most common learning resources used by both dental and medical students were live lectures, lecture handouts and VRL. The majority of both dental (84%) and medical (88%) students used VRL. Most students attended lectures all of the time both before and after the introduction of VRL, even though most dental and medical students believe lectures should be non-compulsory. VRL is a popular learning resource. These findings tie-in with General Dental Council and General Medical Council recommendations that encourage self-directed learning. Dental and Medical schools should offer a range of learning resources and make use of current technology, including the use of VRL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
The Association between Postgraduate Studies, Gender and Qualifying Dental School for Graduates Qualifying from UK Dental Schools between 2000 and 2009
Dent. J. 2017, 5(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5010011
Received: 25 December 2016 / Revised: 25 January 2017 / Accepted: 26 January 2017 / Published: 28 January 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (612 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Various factors will influence a dental graduate’s decision to undertake postgraduate education and training, including encouragement from family, partners and staff at individual dental schools, although there is currently little information available regarding the number and distribution (by dental school) of recent dental [...] Read more.
Various factors will influence a dental graduate’s decision to undertake postgraduate education and training, including encouragement from family, partners and staff at individual dental schools, although there is currently little information available regarding the number and distribution (by dental school) of recent dental graduates undertaking postgraduate studies. The aim of this study was to analyse data on postgraduate qualifications achieved by dentists who graduated from UK dental schools between 2000 and 2009 and relate this to graduate gender. Data were collected from the General Dental Council (GDC) in an anonymous electronic format, analysed and ordered by year of graduation, dental school, gender and type of postgraduate qualification. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of the dentists that graduated between 2000 and 2004 completed postgraduate studies, with more females (26%) than males (23%) obtaining further postgraduate qualifications. Overall, Bristol produced the largest proportion of graduates completing postgraduate study (39%) and of these the largest proportion of female graduates (45%). Glasgow produced the largest proportion of male graduates completing postgraduate study (37%). Membership of the Faculty of Dental Surgery (MFDS), one of the Royal Colleges, was the most popular postgraduate qualification obtained followed by Membership of the Faculty of General Dental Practitioners UK (MFGDP). This study provides insight into postgraduate studies undertaken by UK dental graduates. An increasing proportion of females are gaining Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) qualifications and therefore the number of female dental graduates obtaining postgraduate qualifications is likely to increase further. This also suggests the male domination of the dental profession is likely to decrease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Undergraduate Confidence When Undertaking Root Canal Treatment and Their Perception of the Quality of Their Endodontic Education
Dent. J. 2017, 5(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5010001
Received: 7 November 2016 / Revised: 1 December 2016 / Accepted: 13 December 2016 / Published: 26 December 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (212 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The General Dental Council expects graduating dentists to be competent at treating pulpal disease. Previous studies have found dental undergraduates to have low levels of confidence with respect to endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the confidence of undergraduate [...] Read more.
The General Dental Council expects graduating dentists to be competent at treating pulpal disease. Previous studies have found dental undergraduates to have low levels of confidence with respect to endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the confidence of undergraduate dental students at the University of Bristol when performing root canal treatment, and to investigate their perception of the quality of their endodontic education. An anonymous questionnaire, based upon one used in a 2015 study at Cardiff University, was distributed to all (n = 204) undergraduate students in Years 3–5 at the University of Bristol. The results were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS). There was a 59% (n = 120) response rate and a significant (p < 0.01) difference in confidence levels for root canal treatments (RCTs) completed between these students. All (100%) Year-5 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 91% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. The majority (93%) of Year-4 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 77% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. Over one-half (56%) of Year-3 students felt confident in anterior RCTs and 17% in posterior RCTs. With respect to the individual stages of RCT (access cavity, cleaning and shaping of root canal system, and obturation/filling), results showed that there was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in confidence levels between year groups. Many students thought the amount of time spent on endodontic teaching and the quality of teaching to be satisfactory. Improvements suggested for future endodontic teaching included higher numbers of staff supervision and additional endodontic practice on extracted teeth before seeing patients. There was a strong association between students’ clinical experience and their levels of confidence when completing RCT. Increasing the amount of clinical experience of RCTs could enhance students’ confidence further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
The Use of Pit and Fissure Sealants—A Literature Review
Dent. J. 2017, 5(4), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5040034
Received: 19 October 2017 / Revised: 5 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (464 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reviews the literature and discusses the latest updates on the use of pit and fissure sealants. It demonstrates the effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants in preventing caries and the management of early carious lesions. It compares the use of different [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the literature and discusses the latest updates on the use of pit and fissure sealants. It demonstrates the effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants in preventing caries and the management of early carious lesions. It compares the use of different sealant materials and their indications. It describes the application technique for sealants. It also reviews the cost-effectiveness of sealants as a preventive strategy. From this review and after the discussion of recently published studies on pit and fissure sealants, it is evident that sealants are effective in caries prevention and in preventing the progression of incipient lesions. It is therefore recommended that pit and fissure sealant be applied to high-caries-risk children for optimum cost-effectiveness. It is a highly sensitive technique that needs optimum isolation, cleaning of the tooth surface, etching, and the application of a thin bonding layer for maximum benefit. Recall and repair, when needed, are important to maximize the effectiveness of such sealant use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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