Special Issue "Photonic Crystals and Their Applications"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 3675

Special Issue Editors

Prof. John Rarity
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
Interests: photons; quantum gate design; quantum optics; quantum cryptography; quantum communication; optical communications
Dr. Mike Taverne
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
Interests: photonic crystals; quantum photonics; direct laser writing; computational electromagnetics; Fourier imaging spectroscopy
Dr. Ying-Lung Daniel Ho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Interests: nanophotonics; quantum photonics; computational electromagnetics; focused ion beam; direct laser writing; two-photon polymerization; Fourier imaging spectroscopy; confocal
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

An atomic crystal is formed from a periodic and systematic arrangement of atoms within which electrons feel a periodic potential. This leads to wave vector-specific electronic band structures and is the origin of electronic bandgaps in semiconductor materials. Similarly, in a photonic crystal, the dielectric function varies periodically, leading to photonic band structures. Thus, light can be manipulated by such a structure when its periodicity is comparable to the wavelength of interest.

Since 1987, when photonic crystals were first considered for the strong localization of photons and modification of spontaneous emission by atoms, research on photonic crystals has become one of the most intensely studied subjects.

Photonic crystals have myriad applications in photonics, optomechanics, optoelectronics, signal processing, and quantum technologies ranging from the generation of photons (single-photon sources and lasers), through to their manipulation (waveguiding, beam splitting, filters, spin-photon entanglement) and detection (single-photon detectors) as well as the detection of other changes (gas sensors, biosensors). Their potential to reduce energy losses and increase lasing and energy-harvesting efficiencies could help make technologies more sustainable and ecological.

We invite researchers to contribute to the Special Issue on “Photonic Crystals and Their Applications”, which is intended to serve as a unique multidisciplinary forum covering broad aspects of the science, technology, and application of artificially structured photonic bandgap materials.

The potential topics include, but are not limited to:

-Design and simulation of novel photonic structures and nanophotonic devices;

-Fabrication of novel photonic micro‐ and nanostructures;

-Characterization of photonic crystal structures by angle-resolved light scattering techniques and other advanced techniques;

-Exploitation of the remarkable properties of photonic bandgap materials in various emerging applications.

Dr. Daniel Ho
Dr. Mike Taverne
Prof. John Rarity
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photonic crystals
  • quantum photonics
  • waveguide
  • optical resonance cavity
  • cavity quantum electrodynamics
  • direct laser writing
  • two-photon lithography
  • nanotechnology
  • nanofabrication
  • E-beam lithography
  • focused ion beam milling
  • interference lithography
  • Fourier imaging spectroscopy

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Strongly Confining Light with Air-Mode Cavities in Inverse Rod-Connected Diamond Photonic Crystals
Crystals 2022, 12(3), 303; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst12030303 - 22 Feb 2022
Viewed by 520
Abstract
Three-dimensional dielectric optical crystals with a high index show a complete photonic bandgap (PBG), blocking light propagation in all directions. We show that this bandgap can be used to trap light in low-index defect cavities, leading to strongly enhanced local fields. We compute [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional dielectric optical crystals with a high index show a complete photonic bandgap (PBG), blocking light propagation in all directions. We show that this bandgap can be used to trap light in low-index defect cavities, leading to strongly enhanced local fields. We compute the band structure and optimize the bandgap of an inverse 3D rod-connected diamond (RCD) structure, using the plane-wave expansion (PWE) method. Selecting a structure with wide bandgap parameters, we then add air defects at the center of one of the high-index rods of the crystal and study the resulting cavity modes by exciting them with a broadband dipole source, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Various defect shapes were studied and showed extremely small normalized mode volumes (Veff) with long cavity storage times (quality factor Q). For an air-filled spherical cavity of radius 0.1 unit-cell, a record small-cavity mode volume of Veff~2.2 × 10−3 cubic wavelengths was obtained with Q~3.5 × 106. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystals and Their Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Unidirectional Invisibility in PT-Symmetric Cantor Photonic Crystals
Crystals 2022, 12(2), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst12020199 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 623
Abstract
In this paper, we investigate the nonreciprocity of reflection in parity-time−symmetric (PT-symmetric) Cantor photonic crystals (PCs). Two one-dimensional PCs abiding by the Cantor sequence are PT-symmetric about the center. The PT symmetry and defect cavities in Cantor PCs can induce optical fractal states [...] Read more.
In this paper, we investigate the nonreciprocity of reflection in parity-time−symmetric (PT-symmetric) Cantor photonic crystals (PCs). Two one-dimensional PCs abiding by the Cantor sequence are PT-symmetric about the center. The PT symmetry and defect cavities in Cantor PCs can induce optical fractal states which are transmission modes. Subsequently, the left and right reflectionless states are located on both sides of a transmission peak. The invisible effect depends on the incident direction and the invisible wavelength can be modulated by the gain–loss factor. This study has potential applications in tunable optical reflectors and invisible cloaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystals and Their Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Polarization Splitter-Rotator Based on Multimode Waveguide Grating
Crystals 2021, 11(10), 1170; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst11101170 - 26 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 770
Abstract
We demonstrate a polarization splitter rotator (PSR) based on multimode waveguide grating (MWG) on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Bloch mode hybridization in mini-stopband is exploited to achieve high polarization conversion efficiency. The fabricated device yields a high extinction ratio of > 53 dB [...] Read more.
We demonstrate a polarization splitter rotator (PSR) based on multimode waveguide grating (MWG) on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Bloch mode hybridization in mini-stopband is exploited to achieve high polarization conversion efficiency. The fabricated device yields a high extinction ratio of > 53 dB and > 31 dB, low crosstalk of < −26.4 dB and < −40 dB for the injected TE0 and TM0 mode, with average insertion loss of 1.2 dB and 1.5 dB in the wavelength regime 1552 nm–1562 nm. Such a device shows great design flexibility and an easy fabrication process, serving as a good candidate in integrated polarization diversity circuits, especially for applications requiring spectra manipulation. Additionally, the polarization conversion approach provides opportunities to develop novel polarization management devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystals and Their Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
All-Optically Controllable Photonic Crystals Based on Chiral-Azobenzene-Doped Blue Phase Liquid Crystals
Crystals 2020, 10(10), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10100906 - 06 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 899
Abstract
In this study, the all-optical control properties of photonic crystals based on self-assembled chiral-azobenzene-doped blue phase liquid crystals (CA-BPLCs) were investigated. The difference in the photothermal characteristics of CA-BPLCs with and without homogeneous surface alignment was discussed. Results revealed that surface alignment could [...] Read more.
In this study, the all-optical control properties of photonic crystals based on self-assembled chiral-azobenzene-doped blue phase liquid crystals (CA-BPLCs) were investigated. The difference in the photothermal characteristics of CA-BPLCs with and without homogeneous surface alignment was discussed. Results revealed that surface alignment could induce more uniform and diverse blue phase (BP) structures, including BPII, BPI, and BPS-like phases during cooling. Consequently, the temperature range of BP was wider than that of the sample without surface alignment. All-optical control experiments with light illumination were then performed on the aligned or nonaligned CA-BPLC samples. During continuous irradiation with light beams at wavelengths of 405 and 450 nm, CA dopants underwent trans→cis and cis→trans back photoisomerizations, respectively. These processes promoted isothermal phase transition and wavelength shifting, which further enabled the all-optical control of the CA-BPLC samples. Various optical control modes of BPLC could be achieved through phase change and wavelength shifting by appropriately selecting the working temperature and surface treatment of BPLC. This study could be further used as a basis for developing photoswitchable and tunable BPLC photonic devices, such as light-controllable gratings, filters, mirrors, and lasers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Crystals and Their Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop