Nanocarbon Materials for Biological Application

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 June 2021) | Viewed by 6429

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Seafood Science, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 81157, Taiwan
Interests: lactobacterial fermentation; encapsulation technology; carbon nanoparticles; antimicrobial
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Guest Editor
School of Physical Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK
Interests: carbon nanotubes; graphene; nano-carbon; nano-patterned functional surfaces; inorganic fullerenes; nano-composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been a keen interest in composite materials of nanoscale carbon materials, such as carbon nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, and graphene. Experiments and theoretical research on the innovative characteristics of the crystalline nanocomposites of nanoscale carbon composite materials have been carried out, and the material mechanisms from the nanometer to the macroscopic level are understood. This Special Issue aims to collect manuscripts dealing with the latest developments and exploring future opportunities in the field of carbon nanocrystals and nanocomposites, and their application of nanoscale carbon composite materials in biomedicine. Interested researchers are invited to submit manuscripts on topics including, but not limited to, the following: nanocomposite materials in biological applications, nanocomposite materials in luminescent applications, the functional properties of nanocomposite materials, surface functionalization of nanocomposite materials, and antimicrobial applications.

Dr. Yi-huang Hsueh
Prof. Dr. Karl S. Coleman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nanocomposite materials in biological applications
  • Nanocomposite materials in luminescent applications
  • The functional properties of nanocomposite materials
  • Surface functionalization of nanocomposite materials
  • Antimicrobial applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 95239 KiB  
Article
N-Doped Carbon Quantum Dots as Fluorescent Bioimaging Agents
by Shih-Fu Ou, Ya-Yun Zheng, Sin-Jen Lee, Shyi-Tien Chen, Chien-Hui Wu, Chien-Te Hsieh, Ruey-Shin Juang, Pei-Zhen Peng and Yi-Huang Hsueh
Crystals 2021, 11(7), 789; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst11070789 - 6 Jul 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3932
Abstract
Graphene quantum dots, carbon nanomaterials with excellent fluorescence characteristics, are advantageous for use in biological systems owing to their small size, non-toxicity, and biocompatibility. We used the hydrothermal method to prepare functional N-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) from 1,3,6-trinitropyrene and analyzed their ability [...] Read more.
Graphene quantum dots, carbon nanomaterials with excellent fluorescence characteristics, are advantageous for use in biological systems owing to their small size, non-toxicity, and biocompatibility. We used the hydrothermal method to prepare functional N-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) from 1,3,6-trinitropyrene and analyzed their ability to fluorescently stain various bacteria. Our results showed that N-CQDs stain the cell septa and membrane of the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonellaenteritidis, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. The optimal concentration of N-CQDs was approximately 500 ppm for Gram-negative bacteria and 1000 ppm for Gram-positive bacteria, and the exposure times varied with bacteria. N-Doped carbon quantum dots have better light stability and higher photobleaching resistance than the commercially available FM4-64. When excited at two different wavelengths, N-CQDs can emit light of both red and green wavelengths, making them ideal for bioimaging. They can also specifically stain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell membranes. We developed an inexpensive, relatively easy, and bio-friendly method to synthesize an N-CQD composite. Additionally, they can serve as a universal bacterial membrane-staining dye, with better photobleaching resistance than commercial dyes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocarbon Materials for Biological Application)
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17 pages, 6402 KiB  
Article
Effect of the External Velocity on the Exfoliation Properties of Graphene from Amorphous SiO2 Surface
by Qi Zhang, Xing Pang and Yulong Zhao
Crystals 2021, 11(4), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst11040454 - 20 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1851
Abstract
External action has a significant influence on the formation of high-quality graphene and the adhesion of graphene on the surface of the MEMS/NEMS device. The atomic-scale simulation and calculation can further study the exfoliation process of graphene by external actions. In multilayer graphene [...] Read more.
External action has a significant influence on the formation of high-quality graphene and the adhesion of graphene on the surface of the MEMS/NEMS device. The atomic-scale simulation and calculation can further study the exfoliation process of graphene by external actions. In multilayer graphene systems where graphene layers were simulated weakly contacted with SiO2 substrate, a constant vertical upward velocity (Vup) was applied to the topmost layer. Then two critical velocities were found, and three kinds of distinct exfoliation processes determined by critical upward velocities were observed in multilayer graphene systems. The first critical velocities are in the range of 0.5 Å/ps–3.18 Å/ps, and the second critical velocities are in the range of 9.5 Å/ps–12.1 Å/ps. When the Vup is less than the first critical velocity, all graphene layers will not be exfoliated. When Vup is between the first and second critical Vup, all layers can be exfoliated almost synchronously at last. When Vup is larger than the second critical Vup, the topmost layer can be exfoliated alone, transferring energy to the underlying layers, and the underlying layers are slowly exfoliated. The maximum exfoliation force to exfoliate the topmost layer of graphene is 3200 times larger than that of all graphene layers. Moreover, it is required 149.26 mJ/m2 to get monolayer graphene from multilayers, while peeling off all layers without effort. This study explains the difficulty to get monolayer graphene and why graphene falls off easily during the transfer process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocarbon Materials for Biological Application)
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