Special Issue "Crystallographic Understanding of Deformation, Phase Transformation, and Recrystallization in Materials Engineering"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Alexandru D. Stoica Website E-Mail
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, United States
Interests: neutron optics design of Vulcan; materials science studies by diffraction (deformation and recrystallization of polycrystalline materials, nanocrystallization in bulk metallic glasses)
Guest Editor
Dr. Ke An Website E-Mail
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, United States
Phone: 8655762185
Interests: neutron scattering; deformation; phase transformation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advance of modern characterization tools has made the characterization of materials possible to an unprecedented degree of accuracy, with steeply improving temporal and spatial resolution. This leads to more insightful and comprehensive approaches and promotes breakthroughs in understanding materials; behaviors. For example, diffraction or scattering by electrons, synchrotron x-rays, and neutrons became highly instrumental in unravelling long-lasting questions of materials synthesis, structural evolution, performance enhancement or degradation under external stimuli, such as temperature, stress, electrical, and magnetic fields. This is made possible via the direct or post-mortem observations of crystallographic changes as a result of lattice strains, stacking faults, dislocations, twinning, texture evolution, or phase transition in multilength and time scales. This Special Issue is inviting recent research exploiting state-of-the-art diffraction/scattering tools such as TEM, EBSD, x-rays, and neutrons in understanding the structure-to-properties relationship in materials during synthesis or alloying, processing, (additive) manufacturing, or other real-life operations. Some of the potential areas of focus are new alloys design, smart materials, metal matrix composites, ceramic materials, nuclear materials, additive manufacturing, etc. The crystallographic understanding or characterization of residual stress/strain build-up, strengthening and hardening mechanism, creep, fatigue, super elasticity/plasticity, shape memory effect, piezoelectric effect, mechanocaloric effect, magnetomechanical effect, phase transition under external stimuli, static and dynamic recrystallization, phase segregation, atomic level ordering or disordering, etc. are welcome. The demonstration of new instruments, techniques, and data analysis procedures that advance crystallographic characterizations in materials engineering is also a priority of this Special Issue.

Dr. Alexandru D. Stoica
Dr. Ke An
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Deformation
  • phase transformation
  • recrystallization
  • diffraction
  • scattering
  • mechanical properties
  • anisotropy
  • phase transformation
  • twinning
  • texture
  • ordering and disordering
  • processing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparing Cyclic Tension-Compression Effects on CoCrFeMnNi High-Entropy Alloy and Ni-Based Superalloy
Crystals 2019, 9(8), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9080420 - 13 Aug 2019
Abstract
An equal-molar CoCrFeMnNi, face-centered-cubic (fcc) high-entropy alloy (HEA) and a nickel-based superalloy are studied using in situ neutron diffraction experiments. With continuous measurements, the evolution of diffraction peaks is collected for microscopic lattice strain analyses. Cyclic hardening and softening are found in both [...] Read more.
An equal-molar CoCrFeMnNi, face-centered-cubic (fcc) high-entropy alloy (HEA) and a nickel-based superalloy are studied using in situ neutron diffraction experiments. With continuous measurements, the evolution of diffraction peaks is collected for microscopic lattice strain analyses. Cyclic hardening and softening are found in both metallic systems. However, as obtained from the diffraction-peak-width evolution, the underneath deformation mechanisms are quite different. The CoCrFeMnNi HEA exhibits distinct lattice strain and microstructure responses under tension-compression cyclic loadings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Accurate Method for Crystallographic Reconstruction of Parent Austenite from Inherited Martensite in a Low-Alloy Steel
Crystals 2019, 9(7), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9070358 - 15 Jul 2019
Abstract
The microstructure of austenite at high temperatures, which cannot be reserved at room temperatures, determines the properties of its transformed phase in low-alloy steels. Consequently, an accurate method is herein developed to reconstruct local orientations of the parent austenite ( γ ) phase [...] Read more.
The microstructure of austenite at high temperatures, which cannot be reserved at room temperatures, determines the properties of its transformed phase in low-alloy steels. Consequently, an accurate method is herein developed to reconstruct local orientations of the parent austenite ( γ ) phase from electron backscatter diffraction maps of the martensite ( α ) microstructure. The orientation map of α is cropped into a grid of data squares as the reconstruction unit. The cropped square is then divided into the square inherited from only one γ grain and the square inherited from more than one γ grain. The local orientations around parent γ grain boundaries are more accurately determined using a newly proposed reconstruction criterion. Furthermore, the solution spaces for the orientation relationship and the parent γ orientation are refined, which simultaneously improves the calculation accuracy and efficiency of reconstruction procedure. The validated reconstruction method is applied to obtain local orientations of the deformed γ microstructure accurately. Full article
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