Special Issue "Mechanical Behaviour of Austenitic Stainless Steels"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Antonio Mateo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08034 Barcelona, Spain;
2. Center for Research in Structural lntegrity, Micromechanics and Reliability of Engineering Materials, CIEFMA, Avda.Eduard Maristany, 10-14 08019 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: high strength steels; stainless steels; titanium alloys; additive manufacturing; fatigue and fracture; failure analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gemma Fargas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: Stainless Steels ; titanium alloys; fatigue; failure analysis;

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stainless steels were discovered more than a century ago. They are high-alloy steels that have a more superior corrosion resistance than other steels, because they contain large amounts of chromium. During 2017, 48 million metric tons of stainless steel were produced, and the average yearly growth of the 30 years is an impressive 6%. Around 75% of these tons are of austenitic grades, which are the most common types of stainless steel. This is because of their excellent corrosion and heat resistance, combined with their good mechanical properties over a wide range of temperatures.

Concerning their mechanical properties, the austenitic crystals are face-centered cubic, which makes them very tough and ductile, and also very versatile, because they can be soft enough (with a yield strength about 200 MPa) to be easily formed, but they can also be made very strong by cold work (up to yield strengths over 2.000 MPa). Their engineering scale response to mechanical loading, both during processing and in service, is highly dependent on their crystallographic texture and on microstructural features, particularly martensitic induced transformation. Nowadays, thanks to advanced characterization tools such as FIB, EBSD, and nano-indentation, a deeper insight into the micro-mechanisms that determine the mechanical behavior is possible.

In this Special Issue, an open-access forum is provided for publishing original papers that investigate various aspects of the mechanical behaviour of austenitic stainless steels, including both research and review papers, informing readers about the latest ongoing research and development activities, from prior history to the current state-of-the art.

The Special Issue will include (but will not be limited to) the following topics:

the influence of crystallographic texture on fracture and fatigue behavior, austenite to martensite transformation, local plasticity and deformation mechanisms.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Mateo
Dr. Gemma Fargas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • austenite
  • martensite
  • phase transformation
  • plasticity
  • strength
  • fracture
  • fatigue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Application of Fundamental Models for Creep Rupture Prediction of Sanicro 25 (23Cr25NiWCoCu)
Crystals 2019, 9(12), 638; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9120638 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
Creep rupture prediction is always a critical matter for materials serving at high temperatures and stresses for a long time. Empirical models are frequently used to describe creep rupture, but the parameters of the empirical models do not have any physical meanings, and [...] Read more.
Creep rupture prediction is always a critical matter for materials serving at high temperatures and stresses for a long time. Empirical models are frequently used to describe creep rupture, but the parameters of the empirical models do not have any physical meanings, and the model cannot reveal the controlling mechanisms during creep rupture. Fundamental models have been proposed where no fitting parameters are involved. Both for ductile and brittle creep rupture, fundamental creep models have been used for the austenitic stainless steel Sanicro 25 (23Cr25NiWCoCu). For ductile creep rupture, the dislocation contribution, solid solution hardening, precipitation hardening, and splitting of dislocations were considered. For brittle creep rupture, creep cavitation models were used taking grain boundary sliding, formation, and growth of creep cavities into account. All parameters in the models have been well defined and no fitting is involved. MatCalc was used for the calculation of the evolution of precipitates. Some physical parameters were obtained with first-principles methods. By combining the ductile and brittle creep rupture models, the final creep rupture prediction was made for Sanicro 25. The modeling results can predict the experiments at long-term creep exposure times in a reasonable way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behaviour of Austenitic Stainless Steels)
Open AccessArticle
Development of a Stainless Austenitic Nitrogen-Alloyed CrMnNiMo Spring Steel
Crystals 2019, 9(9), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9090456 - 31 Aug 2019
Abstract
The generation of a nickel-reduced, stainless spring steel strip with a thickness of 0.2 mm, producible under industrial conditions, is the aim of a transfer project together with the Institute of Metal Forming/TU BAF and the Auerhammer Metallwerk GmbH within the DFG Collaborative [...] Read more.
The generation of a nickel-reduced, stainless spring steel strip with a thickness of 0.2 mm, producible under industrial conditions, is the aim of a transfer project together with the Institute of Metal Forming/TU BAF and the Auerhammer Metallwerk GmbH within the DFG Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 799. The spring steel strip should exhibit a tensile strength of ≥1700 MPa in work-hardened and partitioned state. The mechanical and corrosive properties of the steel strip should be equal or better than those given for 1.4310 steel (AISI 301). The article presents the results of laboratory alloys focused on the design of steel strips, which meet the requirements for a cost-effective production. The results presented relate to steel design, microstructure formation, temperature-dependent mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Four alloys of the type X5CrMnNiMoN16-x-4 with manganese contents of approximately 2 to 6 wt.-percent were investigated. The austenitic steel X5CrMnNiMoN16-4-4 with TRIP/TWIP effect was selected for deformation and partitioning treatments. Its deformation-induced α’-martensite formation significantly contributes to the work hardening of the steel. A short-time annealing treatment (partitioning) further increases the strength properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behaviour of Austenitic Stainless Steels)
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Open AccessArticle
Geometrically Necessary Dislocations on Plastic Deformation of Polycrystalline TRIP Steel
Crystals 2019, 9(6), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9060289 - 03 Jun 2019
Abstract
In this study, the main deformation behavior in terms of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) was investigated on a transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) stainless steel by using sharp indentation at nanometric length scale. Results evidence that austenitic grains display an isotropic behavior on terms [...] Read more.
In this study, the main deformation behavior in terms of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) was investigated on a transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) stainless steel by using sharp indentation at nanometric length scale. Results evidence that austenitic grains display an isotropic behavior on terms of GND, the main deformation mechanism being the Frank–Read source activated at local level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behaviour of Austenitic Stainless Steels)
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