Special Issue "The Role of Inflammation in Skin Aging"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bryan Fuller

DermaMedics, LLC (also was a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: regulation of skin pigmentation; skin inflammation pathways; inflammatory skin diseases; drug discovery; natural anti-inflammatories; role of hormones in skin function

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It has been said that every disease and medical problem is due, at least in part, to inflammation. Certainly, skin problems are no exception to this paradigm and, in fact, inflammatory skin diseases represent the number one problem in dermatology. These disorders include contact dermatitis, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, acne, inflammation from medical procedures such as radiation treatments, and even sunburn.  In addition, inflammation plays a key role in the skin aging process. This Special Issue, "The Role of Inflammation in Skin Aging", will cover a range of topics related to the cause, prevention and treatment of inflammation induced skin aging. Articles within this Special Issue will include:

  • Reviews on the key inflammatory mediators and cellular events in skin that contribute to skin aging.
  • Articles on changes to skin structure and gene expression caused by inflammation.
  • Reviews on the mechanism of action of UV radiation in triggering an inflammatory response in skin cells.
  • Overviews regarding the role of the immune system in skin inflammation and aging
  • Research reports on the role of antioxidants in blocking free radical induced inflammation and aging in skin.
  • The search for natural ingredients that can block the inflammatory response in skin and prevent skin damage and aging.

Prof. Dr. Bryan Fuller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • aging
  • UV radiation
  • antioxidants
  • inflammatory mediators
  • cytokines
  • chemokines
  • signaling pathways
  • natural anti-inflammatories

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Role of PGE-2 and Other Inflammatory Mediators in Skin Aging and Their Inhibition by Topical Natural Anti-Inflammatories
Received: 23 November 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
PDF Full-text (3763 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Human skin aging is due to two types of aging processes, “intrinsic” (chronological) aging and “extrinsic” (external factor mediated) aging. While inflammatory events, triggered mainly by sun exposure, but also by pollutants, smoking and stress, are the principle cause of rapid extrinsic aging, [...] Read more.
Human skin aging is due to two types of aging processes, “intrinsic” (chronological) aging and “extrinsic” (external factor mediated) aging. While inflammatory events, triggered mainly by sun exposure, but also by pollutants, smoking and stress, are the principle cause of rapid extrinsic aging, inflammation also plays a key role in intrinsic aging. Inflammatory events in the skin lead to a reduction in collagen gene activity but an increase in activity of the genes for matrix metalloproteinases. Inflammation also alters proliferation rates of cells in all skin layers, causes thinning of the epidermis, a flattening of the dermo-epidermal junction, an increase in irregular pigment production, and, finally, an increased incidence of skin cancer. While a large number of inflammatory mediators, including IL-1, TNF-alpha and PGE-2, are responsible for many of these damaging effects, this review will focus primarily on the role of PGE-2 in aging. Levels of this hormone-like mediator increase quickly when skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), causing changes in genes needed for normal skin structure and function. Further, PGE-2 levels in the skin gradually increase with age, regardless of whether or not the skin is protected from UVR, and this smoldering inflammation causes continuous damage to the dermal matrix. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, PGE-2 is strongly linked to skin cancer. This review will focus on: (1) the role of inflammation, and particularly the role of PGE-2, in accelerating skin aging, and (2) current research on natural compounds that inhibit PGE-2 production and how these can be developed into topical products to retard or even reverse the aging process, and to prevent skin cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Inflammation in Skin Aging)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Anti-aging Effects of Select Botanicals: Scientific Evidence and Current Trends
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 5 September 2018 / Accepted: 10 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As skin ages, there is a decline in physiologic function. These changes are induced by both intrinsic (chronologic) and extrinsic (predominately UV-induced) factors. Botanicals offer potential benefits to combat some of the signs of aging. Here, we review select botanicals and the scientific [...] Read more.
As skin ages, there is a decline in physiologic function. These changes are induced by both intrinsic (chronologic) and extrinsic (predominately UV-induced) factors. Botanicals offer potential benefits to combat some of the signs of aging. Here, we review select botanicals and the scientific evidence behind their anti-aging claims. Botanicals may offer anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, moisturizing, UV-protective, and other effects. A multitude of botanicals are listed as ingredients in popular cosmetics and cosmeceuticals, but only a select few are discussed here. These were chosen based on the availability of scientific data, personal interest of the authors, and perceived “popularity” of current cosmetic and cosmeceutical products. The botanicals reviewed here include argan oil, coconut oil, crocin, feverfew, green tea, marigold, pomegranate, and soy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Inflammation in Skin Aging)
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