Special Issue "Contact Allergy to Fragrances"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francesca Larese Filon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste, Italy
Interests: contact dermatitis; patch test; occupational dermatitis; skin absorption of chemicals; skin protection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contact allergy to fragrances is a large problem due to the increase of skin susceptibility in people and the use of many fragrances in cosmetics and detergents. A better knowledge of sensitization in large cohorts of patients with allergic contact dermatitis, will help to individuate the more sensitizing fragrances, aiming to suggest a reduction of their use in cosmetics and detergents. A time-trend evaluation in the last 20 years will help to understand the burden of this problem and to verify the changeover of sensitization. Moreover, some occupational groups are at higher risk to develop sensitization to fragrances, due to repeated contact with products contained fragrances. For them, there is the need to increase the use of protective measures to prevent sensitization. The aim of this Special Issue will be to focus on this problem to suggest preventive actions.

Prof. Dr. Francesca Larese Filon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fragrances
  • patch test
  • allergic contact dermatitis
  • epidemiology
  • prevention
  • occupation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Contact Allergy to Fragrances: In Vitro Opportunities for Safety Assessment
Cosmetics 2019, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics6010003 - 04 Jan 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4405
Abstract
The majority of cosmetic products contain fragrances to make products more pleasant to the consumer, as we all like goods that smell nice. Unfortunately, contact allergy to fragrance compounds is among the most frequent findings in patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis. In [...] Read more.
The majority of cosmetic products contain fragrances to make products more pleasant to the consumer, as we all like goods that smell nice. Unfortunately, contact allergy to fragrance compounds is among the most frequent findings in patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis. In order to revert this and to reduce contact allergy to cosmetics, it is imperative to improve safety assessment of cosmetic products for skin sensitization. In the era of animal ban for cosmetic ingredients, this represents a challenge. Luckily, in the last decades, substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanism of chemical-induced contact allergy and several in vitro methods are available for hazard identification. The purpose of this manuscript is to explore the possibility of non-animal testing for quantitative risk assessment of fragrance-induced contact allergy, essential for cosmetic products, which cannot be tested on animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contact Allergy to Fragrances)
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