Special Issue "Coatings and Sustainability"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rafael L. Quirino Website E-Mail
Department of Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460, USA
Phone: +1-912-478-2345
Interests: bio-based polymer and composites; oleochemistry; carbon nanotubes; microwaves

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Coatings on “Coatings and Sustainability” will cover original research articles as well as critical reviews and perspectives on any topics related to the synthesis, preparation, application, characterization, or properties of polymeric coatings prepared from bio-based resources, or inspired by biological systems. Submissions addressing environmentally friendly alternatives to non bio-based systems, functional coatings, composites, recycling of coating materials, waterborne formulations, and environmental issues where coatings may exhibit a positive impact are also welcome. Manuscripts on original research should include a thorough analysis of any system investigated clearly showing the chemistry proposed. Review articles should focus more on recent advancements, covering primarily, but not limited to, the last decade (~2004–2014).

Dr. Rafael L. Quirino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • bio-based coatings
  • biorenewable materials
  • recycling
  • environmentally friendly approaches
  • bio-inspired materials
  • hybrid coatings
  • functional coatings

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
UV-LED Curing Efficiency of Wood Coatings
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 1019-1033; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5041019 - 18 Dec 2015
Cited by 4
Abstract
Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) have attracted great interest in recent years. They can be used to polymerize coatings, such as those used for prefinished wood flooring. In this project, two lamps were compared for their suitability to be used on a wood [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) have attracted great interest in recent years. They can be used to polymerize coatings, such as those used for prefinished wood flooring. In this project, two lamps were compared for their suitability to be used on a wood flooring finishing line: a UV-microwave and a UV-LED lamp. Low heat emission was found for the UV-LED lamp compared to the UV-microwave one. This study also reveals that the 4 W/cm2 UV-LED lamp used is not powerful enough to cure UV high solids acrylate coatings while satisfactory results can be obtained for UV water-based formulations. In fact, conversion percentages were found to be low for the high solids coatings, leaving the coatings tacky. Higher conversion percentages were obtained for the UV water-based formulations. As a result, mass loss, hardness, and scratch resistance found for the samples cured by UV-LED were closed to the ones found for the samples cured using the UV microwave lamp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Microwave Cure on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Tung Oil-Based/Carbon Nanotube Composites
Coatings 2015, 5(3), 557-575; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5030557 - 17 Sep 2015
Cited by 2
Abstract
Tung oil is uniquely reactive among plant-based natural oils due to the series ofconjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in its fatty acid chains. These conjugatedcarbon-carbon double bonds impart a high reactivity towards cationic polymerization in thepresence of other reactive co-monomers, such as divinylbenzene and [...] Read more.
Tung oil is uniquely reactive among plant-based natural oils due to the series ofconjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in its fatty acid chains. These conjugatedcarbon-carbon double bonds impart a high reactivity towards cationic polymerization in thepresence of other reactive co-monomers, such as divinylbenzene and styrene. An impressivedecrease in the cure time of tung oil-based thermosets has been achieved when the resinsinvestigated were microwaved in the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, thefast cure compromised the overall thermo-mechanical properties of the materialsinvestigated. Microwave power, exposure time, and CNT loading effects have been assessedby means of dielectric analysis (DEA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differentialscanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and proton nuclearmagnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy of extracts obtained by Soxhlet extraction.Possible reasons were proposed to explain the overall inferior properties observed wheneverfaster cure rates were achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Thermomechanical Properties of Polyurethanes and Biocomposites Derived from Macauba Oil and Coconut Husk Fibers
Coatings 2015, 5(3), 527-544; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5030527 - 26 Aug 2015
Cited by 7
Abstract
This work reports on a very effective route to produce bio-based polyurethanes (PUs) and composites with high content of renewable carbon sources. The PUs are prepared with polyols synthesized from macauba oil (Acrocomia aculeata) and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate, at different [NCO]/[OH] molar ratios. [...] Read more.
This work reports on a very effective route to produce bio-based polyurethanes (PUs) and composites with high content of renewable carbon sources. The PUs are prepared with polyols synthesized from macauba oil (Acrocomia aculeata) and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate, at different [NCO]/[OH] molar ratios. Later, biocomposites are prepared with the as-obtained PUs reinforced with coconut husk fibers. The successful synthesis of natural oil-based polyols is ascribed to the hydroxylation and consumption of carbon-carbon double bonds in the fatty acid chains of the original starting oil as attested by FTIR spectroscopy. According to different thermal analysis techniques (TG, DTG, and DTA), the increase in the [NCO]/[OH] molar ratio improves the thermal stability of PUs, likely due to an increase of crosslinks. Dynamic mechanical analysis evidences the reinforcement effect of coconut husk fibers in bio-based PUs. The present PUs and composites are of low-cost and environmentally friendly materials for structural applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings and Sustainability)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
State of the Art in the Development and Properties of Protein-Based Films and Coatings and Their Applicability to Cellulose Based Products: An Extensive Review
Coatings 2016, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings6010001 - 31 Dec 2015
Cited by 35
Abstract
There is increasing research towards the substitution of petrochemicals by sustainable components. Biopolymers such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids derive from a variety of crop sources and most promisingly from waste streams generated during their processing by the agro food industry. Among those, [...] Read more.
There is increasing research towards the substitution of petrochemicals by sustainable components. Biopolymers such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids derive from a variety of crop sources and most promisingly from waste streams generated during their processing by the agro food industry. Among those, proteins of different types such as whey, casein, gelatin, wheat gluten, soy protein or zein present a potential beyond the food and feed industry for the application in packaging. The general protein hydrophilicity promotes a good compatibility to polar surfaces, such as paper, and a good barrier to apolar gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The present review deals with the development of protein-based coatings and films. It includes relevant discussion for application in paper or board products, as well as an outlook on its future industrial potential. Proteins with suitable functionalities as food packaging materials are described as well as the different technologies for processing the coatings and the current state of the art about the coating formulations for selectively modulating barrier, mechanical, surface and end of life properties. Some insights onto regulations about packaging use, end of life and perspectives of such natural coating for decreasing the environmental impact of packages are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings and Sustainability)
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Open AccessReview
Bio-Based Coatings for Paper Applications
Coatings 2015, 5(4), 887-930; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings5040887 - 20 Nov 2015
Cited by 45
Abstract
The barrier resistance and wettability of papers are commonly controlled by the application of petroleum-based derivatives such as polyethylene, waxes and/or fluor- derivatives as coating. While surface hydrophobicity is improved by employing these polymers, they have become disfavored due to limitations in fossil-oil [...] Read more.
The barrier resistance and wettability of papers are commonly controlled by the application of petroleum-based derivatives such as polyethylene, waxes and/or fluor- derivatives as coating. While surface hydrophobicity is improved by employing these polymers, they have become disfavored due to limitations in fossil-oil resources, poor recyclability, and environmental concerns on generated waste with lack of biodegradation. Alternatively, biopolymers including polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and polyesters can be used to formulate new pathways for fully bio-based paper coatings. However, difficulties in processing of most biopolymers may arise due to hydrophilicity, crystallization behavior, brittleness or melt instabilities that hinder a full exploitation at industrial scale. Therefore, blending with other biopolymers, plasticizers and compatibilizers is advantageous to improve the coating performance. In this paper, an overview of barrier properties and processing of bio-based polymers and their composites as paper coating will be discussed. In particular, recent technical advances in nanotechnological routes for bio-based nano- composite coatings will be summarized, including the use of biopolymer nanoparticles, or nanofillers such as nanoclay and nanocellulose. The combination of biopolymers along with surface modification of nanofillers can be used to create hierarchical structures that enhance hydrophobicity, complete barrier protection and functionalities of coated papers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings and Sustainability)
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