Special Issue "Advances in Analytical Systems for Gaseous Mixture"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Methods, Instrumentation and Miniaturization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2022 | Viewed by 3401

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stéphane Le Calvé
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry and Processes for Energy, Environment and Health (ICPEES), University of Strasbourg and CNRS (UMR 7515), 25 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France
Interests: air quality; atmospheric chemistry; analytical chemistry; volatile organic compounds; microfluidics; miniaturized devices; sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sulaiman Khan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light & Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
Interests: microfluidics; microdevices; chemical sensors; hemodynamics; microfabrication; additive manufacturing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Portable on-line analysis systems have recently gained attention for the analysis of gaseous mixtures, particularly for indoor and outdoor air pollution owing to its high sensitivity, compact structure, and fast-time response. They have lower cost and energy consumption than conventional analytical systems with comparable performances. These portable systems are suitable for automation with no requirement of high skills for operation. These systems have been successfully applied in the monitoring of indoor and outdoor air quality for safety; industrial applications in food and petrochemical for species control and safety; biomedical application for non-invasive, real-time and point-of-care diagnostics.

This special issue is dedicated to the recent novel and state-of-art approaches applied in the design of analysis systems for gaseous mixtures. The issue will explore new designs of gas sampling, gas fluidics and detection architectures developed to improve the performances of the device such as sensitivity, time-resolution, selectivity, portability, and its applications in different domains. The issue is focused on the following topics but not limited to it:

  • On-line analysis system for gaseous mixture
  • Gas analysis instrumentation
  • Gas sensors (Optical sensors, metal oxide sensors, acoustic sensors, photoionization detectors, electrochemical sensors, …)
  • Gas chromatography
  • Pre-concentration units
  • Different sampling techniques
  • Micro gas flow (Numerical and experimental research)
  • MEMS-based systems
  • Different data analysis approaches like deep learning for gases detection

Dr. Stéphane Le Calvé
Dr. Sulaiman Khan
Guest Editors

If you want to learn more information or need any advice, you can contact the Special Issue Editor Tammy Zhang via <[email protected]> directly.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Enose Lab Made with Vacuum Sampling: Quantitative Applications
Chemosensors 2022, 10(7), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10070261 - 05 Jul 2022
Viewed by 117
Abstract
A lab-made electronic nose (Enose) with vacuum sampling and a sensor array, comprising nine metal oxide semiconductor Figaro gas sensors, was tested for the quantitative analysis of vapor–liquid equilibrium, described by Henry’s law, of aqueous solutions of organic compounds: three alcohols (i.e., methanol, [...] Read more.
A lab-made electronic nose (Enose) with vacuum sampling and a sensor array, comprising nine metal oxide semiconductor Figaro gas sensors, was tested for the quantitative analysis of vapor–liquid equilibrium, described by Henry’s law, of aqueous solutions of organic compounds: three alcohols (i.e., methanol, ethanol, and propanol) or three chemical compounds with different functional groups (i.e., acetaldehyde, ethanol, and ethyl acetate). These solutions followed a fractional factorial design to guarantee orthogonal concentrations. Acceptable predictive ridge regression models were obtained for training, with RSEs lower than 7.9, R2 values greater than 0.95, slopes varying between 0.84 and 1.00, and intercept values close to the theoretical value of zero. Similar results were obtained for the test data set: RSEs lower than 8.0, R2 values greater than 0.96, slopes varying between 0.72 and 1.10, and some intercepts equal to the theoretical value of zero. In addition, the total mass of the organic compounds of each aqueous solution could be predicted, pointing out that the sensors measured mainly the global contents of the vapor phases. The satisfactory quantitative results allowed to conclude that the Enose could be a useful tool for the analysis of volatiles from aqueous solutions containing organic compounds for which Henry’s law is applicable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Analytical Systems for Gaseous Mixture)
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Article
Assessing over Time Performance of an eNose Composed of 16 Single-Type MOX Gas Sensors Applied to Classify Two Volatiles
Chemosensors 2022, 10(3), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10030118 - 19 Mar 2022
Viewed by 762
Abstract
This paper assesses the over time performance of a custom electronic nose (eNose) composed of an array of commercial low-cost and single-type miniature metal-oxide (MOX) semiconductor gas sensors. The eNose uses 16 BME680 versatile sensor devices, each including an embedded non-selective MOX gas [...] Read more.
This paper assesses the over time performance of a custom electronic nose (eNose) composed of an array of commercial low-cost and single-type miniature metal-oxide (MOX) semiconductor gas sensors. The eNose uses 16 BME680 versatile sensor devices, each including an embedded non-selective MOX gas sensor that was originally proposed to measure the total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in the air. This custom eNose has been used previously to detect ethanol and acetone, obtaining initial promising classification results that worsened over time because of sensor drift. The current paper assesses the over time performance of different classification methods applied to process the information gathered from the eNose. The best classification results have been obtained when applying a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to the normalized conductance of the sensing layer of the 16 MOX gas sensors available in the eNose. The LDA procedure by itself has reduced the influence of drift in the classification performance of this single-type eNose during an evaluation period of three months. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Analytical Systems for Gaseous Mixture)
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Article
A MEMS µ-Preconcentrator Employing a Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane for Highly Volatile Organic Compound Sampling
Chemosensors 2021, 9(5), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9050104 - 07 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
This paper presents the synthesis and evaluation of a carbon molecular sieve membrane (CMSM) grown inside a MEMS-fabricated μ-preconcentrator for sampling highly volatile organic compounds. An array of µ-pillars measuring 100 µm in diameter and 250 µm in height were fabricated inside a [...] Read more.
This paper presents the synthesis and evaluation of a carbon molecular sieve membrane (CMSM) grown inside a MEMS-fabricated μ-preconcentrator for sampling highly volatile organic compounds. An array of µ-pillars measuring 100 µm in diameter and 250 µm in height were fabricated inside a microfluidic channel to increase the attaching surface for the CMSM. The surface area of the CMSM was measured as high as 899 m2/g. A GC peak amplification factor >2 × 104 was demonstrated with gaseous ethyl acetate. Up to 1.4 L of gaseous ethanol at the 100 ppb level could be concentrated without exceeding the capacity of this microchip device. Sharp desorption chromatographic peaks (<3.5 s) were obtained while using this device directly as a GC injector. Less volatile compounds such as gaseous toluene, m-xylene, and mesitylene appeared to be adsorbed strongly on CMSM, showing a memory effect. Sampling parameters such as sample volatilities, sampling capacities, and compound residual issues were empirically determined and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Analytical Systems for Gaseous Mixture)
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Article
A Sensitive and Portable Deep-UV Absorbance Detector with a Microliter Gas Cell Compatible with Micro GC
Chemosensors 2021, 9(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9040063 - 27 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 904
Abstract
Deep-UV absorption spectrometry for detection of toxic airborne gases, for instance, Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) has drawn considerable attention owing to its high sensitivity and reliability. However, the development of a deep-UV absorbance detector having good sensitivity, portability, and a low-volume [...] Read more.
Deep-UV absorption spectrometry for detection of toxic airborne gases, for instance, Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) has drawn considerable attention owing to its high sensitivity and reliability. However, the development of a deep-UV absorbance detector having good sensitivity, portability, and a low-volume gas cell with applicability for a micro Gas Chromatography (μGC) is challenging. Herein we present a novel, self-referenced, and portable deep-UV absorbance detector with a microliter (275 μL) gas cell having minimal dead volume. It has excellent compatibility with μGC for detection of individual BTEX components in a mixed sample at a sub-ppm level. The design consists of the latest, portable, and cost-effective optical and electronic components, i.e., deep-UV LED, hollow-core waveguide, and photodiodes. The detector directly measures the absorbance values in volts using an integrated circuit with a log-ratio amplifier. The prototype was tested with direct injection of toluene-N2 (1.5 ppm to 50 ppm) and good linearity (R2 = 0.99) with a limit of detection of 196 ppb was obtained. The absorbance detector with μGC setup was tested with a BTEX mixture in N2 at different GC column temperatures. All the BTEX species were sequentially separated and detected with an individual peak for a concentration range of 2.5 ppm to 10 ppm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Analytical Systems for Gaseous Mixture)
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