Special Issue "Hydrogen Production via Steam Reforming from Biomass and Waste Derivates"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Gartzen Lopez Website E-Mail
University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Campus Bizkaia, Department of Chemical Engineering, Bilbao, Spain
Phone: +34 94 601 5414
Interests: pyrolysis; gasification; spouted bed; biomass; waste management
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maite Artetxe Uria Website E-Mail
University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Campus Bizkaia, Department of Chemical Engineering, Bilbao, Spain
Interests: pyrolysis; spouted bed; catalysts; waste plastics; biomass; pyrolysis-reforming

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The demand for hydrogen in key sectors, such as ammonia production, oil refining and methanol production, is expected to grow over the coming decades. Moreover, 96% of the global hydrogen produced is of fossil origin, i.e., the main sources are the reforming of natural gas and oil fractions, and coal gasification. The processes for producing hydrogen from biomass and waste are therefore attracting increasingly more attention, with thermochemical routes being those with the best perspectives for their full-scale development. The catalytic steam reforming of biomass and waste-derived products provides an opportunity for producing hydrogen from renewable and sustainable sources. Two types of processes may be considered as direct and indirect routes. On the one hand, direct routes pursue the conversion of biomass and waste into hydrogen in an integrated process, with pyrolysis and in-line reforming being the ones most representative of this strategy. On the other hand, in the indirect approach, an intermediate product (bio-oil) is produced and transported to centralized units for its reforming. Despite the research conducted on these processes in recent years, the studies published are clearly of a preliminary nature, and further research is required for their scaling-up. It should be noted that key aspects of the catalytic reforming step remain unclear, such as the optimization of the reforming catalysts, knowledge of catalyst deactivation, and reactor design and modeling.

Dr. Gartzen Lopez
Dr. Maite Artetxe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • steam reforming 
  • catalyst 
  • biomass 
  • waste plastics
  • bio-oil reforming
  • hydrogen
  • pyrolysis-reforming 
  • deactivation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Catalyst Performance in the HDPE Pyrolysis-Reforming under Reaction-Regeneration Cycles
Catalysts 2019, 9(5), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9050414 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The performance of a Ni commercial catalyst has been studied under reaction-regeneration cycles in a continuous process consisting of the flash pyrolysis (500 °C) of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR), followed by catalytic steam reforming in-line (700 ºC) [...] Read more.
The performance of a Ni commercial catalyst has been studied under reaction-regeneration cycles in a continuous process consisting of the flash pyrolysis (500 °C) of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR), followed by catalytic steam reforming in-line (700 ºC) of the volatiles formed in a fluidized bed reactor. The catalyst is regenerated between reactions by coke combustion in situ in the reforming reactor, using a sequence of air concentrations and following a temperature ramp between 600 and 700 °C. Several analytical techniques (TPO, TEM, XRD, and TPR) have proven that the catalyst does not fully recover its initial activity by coke combustion due to the sintering of Ni0 active sites. This sintering process is steadily attenuated in the successive reaction-regeneration cycles and the catalyst approaches a steady state. Full article
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