Special Issue "Electrocatalytic Processing of Biomass for Energy Conversion and Storage"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 2745

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jamie Holladay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA
Interests: electrochemical reactions; fuel cells; hydrogen production; biomass upgrading; catalysis
Dr. Oliver Y. Gutierrez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; electrocatalysis; kinetics; hydrotreating; biomass conversion
Dr. Roger Rousseau
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
Interests: computational catalysis; multiscale modeling; electrochemical conversions; biomass conversion
Dr. Vassiliki-Alexandra Glezakou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
Interests: Electronic structure, molecular dynamics, data science, CO2 capture and conversion, catalysis, seperations
Dr. Kelsey Stoerzinger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Interests: electrocatalysis; hydrogen production; surface chemistry; energy storage; fuel cells
Dr. Juan Lopez-Ruiz
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
Interests: electrocatalytic reactions; hydrogen production; waste valorization; biomass upgrading; heterogeneous catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Given the surge in interest for sustainable and resilient energy systems, we are publishing a Special Issue dedicated to combining fuel cell technology with conversion of organic compounds. This issue will focus on using biomass in fuel cells to generate power, or in electrolysis cells to generate hydrogen, as well as transforming biomass into products with fuel cell technology. The issue will include reviews and original research describing recent advances in catalyst and process development, catalytic fuel cells and electrolyzers, microbial fuel cells and electrolyzers, computational studies, and technoeconomic analysis.

Dr. Jamie Holladay
Dr. Oliver Y. Gutierrez
Dr. Roger Rousseau
Dr. Vassiliki-Alexandra Glezakou
Dr. Kelsey Stoerzinger
Dr. Juan Lopez-Ruiz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fuel cells
  • electrocatalysts
  • electrochemical oxidation, electrochemical reduction
  • oxygen evolution reaction
  • biomass conversion, electrochemical synthesis
  • theory and simulation, computational catalysis, electrocatalysis
  • electrochemistry
  • hydrogen production
  • electrosynthesis
  • microbial fuel cells
  • microbial electrolyzers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Elucidating the Influence of Electric Fields toward CO2 Activation on YSZ (111)
Catalysts 2021, 11(2), 271; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11020271 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
Despite its high thermodynamic stability, the presence of a negative electric field is known to facilitate the activation of CO2 through electrostatic effects. To utilize electric fields for a reverse water gas shift reaction, it is critical to elucidate the role of [...] Read more.
Despite its high thermodynamic stability, the presence of a negative electric field is known to facilitate the activation of CO2 through electrostatic effects. To utilize electric fields for a reverse water gas shift reaction, it is critical to elucidate the role of an electric field on a catalyst surface toward activating a CO2 molecule. We conduct a first-principles study to gain an atomic and electronic description of adsorbed CO2 on YSZ (111) surfaces when external electric fields of +1 V/Å, 0 V/Å, and −1 V/Å are applied. We find that the application of an external electric field generally destabilizes oxide bonds, where the direction of the field affects the location of the most favorable oxygen vacancy. The direction of the field also drastically impacts how CO2 adsorbs on the surface. CO2 is bound by physisorption when a +1 V/Å field is applied, a similar interaction as to how it is adsorbed in the absence of a field. This interaction changes to chemisorption when the surface is exposed to a −1 V/Å field value, resulting in the formation of a CO3 complex. The strong interaction is reflected through a direct charge transfer and an orbital splitting within the Olatticep-states. While CO2 remains physisorbed when a +1 V/Å field value is applied, our total density of states analysis indicates that a positive field pulls the charge away from the adsorbate, resulting in a shift of its bonding and antibonding peaks to higher energies, allowing a stronger interaction with YSZ (111). Ultimately, the effect of an electric field toward CO2 adsorption is not negligible, and there is potential in utilizing electric fields to favor the thermodynamics of CO2 reduction on heterogeneous catalysts. Full article
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Perspective
Electrocatalysts for Using Renewably-Sourced, Organic Electrolytes for Redox Flow Batteries
Catalysts 2021, 11(3), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030315 - 28 Feb 2021
Viewed by 821
Abstract
Biomass could be a source of the redox shuttles that have shown promise for operation as high potential, organic electrolytes for redox flow batteries. There is a sufficient quantity of biomass to satisfy the growing demand to buffer the episodic nature of renewably [...] Read more.
Biomass could be a source of the redox shuttles that have shown promise for operation as high potential, organic electrolytes for redox flow batteries. There is a sufficient quantity of biomass to satisfy the growing demand to buffer the episodic nature of renewably produced electricity. However, despite a century of effort, it is still not evident how to use existing information from organic electrochemistry to design the electrocatalysts or supporting electrolytes that will confer the required activity, selectivity and longevity. In this research, the use of a fiducial reaction to normalize reaction rates is shown to fail. Full article
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