Special Issue "Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Agus Pulung Sasmito
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A2A7, Canada
Interests: multiphysics modeling; mine ventilation; energy systems; industrial transport processes and thermal–fluid sciences and engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jundika Candra Kurnia
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Malaysia
Interests: thermal energy storage; energy systems; industrial transport processes and thermal–fluid sciences and engineering; mine ventilation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For decades, catalytic reaction has been widely adopted in many fields and applications, ranging from hydrogenation, semi-hydrogenation, chemical synthesis, to pollutant (such as CO2 and methane) mitigation. It has attracted considerable attention from researchers worldwide due to the complex transport phenomena and reactions involved. Despite the extensive studies on catalytic reaction that have been reported, though, further studies are required to elaborate on the underlying physicochemical mechanisms of the reaction and to expedite the development of a catalytic reactor for industrial applications.

This Special Issue aims at compiling the best papers on the development and investigation of a catalytic reactor for industrial applications. Hence, we cordially invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. We welcome both experimental and computational studies. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  • Design of catalytic reactors for specific industrial applications;
  • Performance enhancement and optimization of catalytic reactors;
  • Technoeconomic and life cycle analysis of catalytic reactors.

For inquiries regarding this Special Issue, please contact Dr Agus P Sasmito ([email protected]).

Dr. Agus Pulung Sasmito
Dr. Jundika Candra Kurnia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • catalytic reaction
  • industrial application
  • performance evaluation and enhancement
  • tehnoeconomic and lifecycle analysis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Catalyst Special Issue on Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications
Catalysts 2021, 11(4), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11040440 - 30 Mar 2021
Viewed by 265
Abstract
Due its better reaction performance, catalytic reaction has been a major choice in various chemical industries [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Catalytic Evaluation of Nanoflower Structured Manganese Oxide Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Media
Catalysts 2020, 10(8), 822; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10080822 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 840
Abstract
An electrochemical nanoflowers manganese oxide (MnO2) catalyst has gained much interest due to its high stability and high specific surface area. However, there are a lack of insightful studies of electrocatalyst performance in nanoflower MnO2. This study assesses the [...] Read more.
An electrochemical nanoflowers manganese oxide (MnO2) catalyst has gained much interest due to its high stability and high specific surface area. However, there are a lack of insightful studies of electrocatalyst performance in nanoflower MnO2. This study assesses the electrocatalytic performances of nanoflower structure MnO2 for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in a zinc–air battery as a bifunctional electrocatalyst. The prepared catalyst was characterized in term of morphology, crystallinity, and total surface area. Cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry were used to evaluate the electrochemical behaviors of the as-prepared nanoflower-like MnO2. The discharge performance test for zinc–air battery with a MnO2 catalyst was also conducted. The results show that the MnO2 prepared at dwell times of 2, 4 and 6 h were nanoflowers, nanoflower mixed with nanowires, and nanowires with corresponding specific surface areas of 52.4, 34.9 and 32.4 g/cm2, respectively. The nanoflower-like MnO2 catalyst exhibits a better electrocatalytic performance towards both ORR and OER compared to the nanowires. The number of electrons transferred for the MnO2 with nanoflower, nanoflower mixed with nanowires, and nanowire structures is 3.68, 3.31 and 3.00, respectively. The as-prepared MnO2 nanoflower-like structure exhibits the best discharge performance of 31% higher than the nanowires and reaches up to 30% of the theoretical discharge capacity of the zinc–air battery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Numerical Investigation of Ventilation Air Methane Catalytic Combustion in Circular Straight and Helical Coil Channels with Twisted Tape Insert in Catalytic-Monolith Reactors
Catalysts 2020, 10(7), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10070797 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 797
Abstract
In a catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane, one of the key factors determining the reactor performance is the geometry of the reactor. It should be designed to provide maximum energy conversion at minimum catalyst usage and operating cost. This numerical study is [...] Read more.
In a catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane, one of the key factors determining the reactor performance is the geometry of the reactor. It should be designed to provide maximum energy conversion at minimum catalyst usage and operating cost. This numerical study is conducted to investigate the catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane from a gassy underground mine in a circular straight and helical reactor channel with twisted tape insert. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model which considers conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species together with chemical reactions, and constitutive relations for species properties and reactions kinetics was developed and validated against the previously published data. The effect of several key factors affecting the catalytic combustion performance such as inlet Reynolds number, twisted tape ratio, and reactor length are evaluated to obtain the optimum reactor parameters. For evaluation purpose, the reaction performance of the studied reactors will be compared to the straight reactor without twisted tape which is set as a baseline. The results give a firm confirmation on the superior performance of the reactors with twisted tape insert as compared to those without. In addition, it is found that helical reactors generate higher net power as compared to their respective straight reactor counterpart despite having lower FoM due to larger catalyst area. Interestingly, the higher twisting ratio offers better performance in terms of net power as well as FoM. Overall, the results highlight the potential of twisted tape insert application in catalytic combustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Process and Techno-Economic Analysis for Fuel and Chemical Production by Hydrodeoxygenation of Bio-Oil
Catalysts 2019, 9(12), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9121021 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1216
Abstract
The catalytic hydrogenation of lignocellulosic derived bio-oil was assessed from the thermodynamic simulation perspective, in order to evaluate its economic potential for the production of added-value chemicals and drop-in fuels. A preliminary economic evaluation was first run to identify the conditions where the [...] Read more.
The catalytic hydrogenation of lignocellulosic derived bio-oil was assessed from the thermodynamic simulation perspective, in order to evaluate its economic potential for the production of added-value chemicals and drop-in fuels. A preliminary economic evaluation was first run to identify the conditions where the process is profitable, while a full economic analysis evaluated how the operating conditions affected the reaction in terms of yield. The results indicate that the bio-oil should be separated into water-soluble and insoluble fractions previous hydrogenation, since very different process conditions are required for the two portions. The maximum economic potential resulted in 38,234 MM$/y for a capacity of bio-oil processed of 10 Mt/y. In the simulated biorefinery, the insoluble bio-oil fraction (IBO) was processed to produce biofuels with a cost of 22.22 and 18.87 $/GJ for light gasoline and diesel, respectively. The water-soluble bio-oil fraction (WBO) was instead processed to produce 51.43 ton/day of chemicals, such as sorbitol, propanediol, butanediol, etc., for a value equal to the market price. The economic feasibility of the biorefinery resulted in a return of investment (ROI) of 69.18%, a pay-out time of 2.48 years and a discounted cash flow rate of return (DCFROR) of 19.11%, considering a plant cycle life of 30 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Electrochemical Reactors for CO2 Conversion
Catalysts 2020, 10(5), 473; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10050473 - 26 Apr 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2432
Abstract
Increasing risks from global warming impose an urgent need to develop technologically and economically feasible means to reduce CO2 content in the atmosphere. Carbon capture and utilization technologies and carbon markets have been established for this purpose. Electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reaction [...] Read more.
Increasing risks from global warming impose an urgent need to develop technologically and economically feasible means to reduce CO2 content in the atmosphere. Carbon capture and utilization technologies and carbon markets have been established for this purpose. Electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR) presents a promising solution, fulfilling carbon-neutral goals and sustainable materials production. This review aims to elaborate on various components in CO2RR reactors and relevant industrial processing. First, major performance metrics are discussed, with requirements obtained from a techno-economic analysis. Detailed discussions then emphasize on (i) technical benefits and challenges regarding different reactor types, (ii) critical features in flow cell systems that enhance CO2 diffusion compared to conventional H-cells, (iii) electrolyte and its effect on liquid phase electrolyzers, (iv) catalysts for feasible products (carbon monoxide, formic acid and multi-carbons) and (v) strategies on flow channel and anode design as next steps. Finally, specific perspectives on CO2 feeds for the reactor and downstream purification techniques are annotated as part of the CO2RR industrial processing. Overall, we focus on the component and system aspects for the design of a CO2RR reactor, while pointing out challenges and opportunities to realize the ultimate goal of viable carbon capture and utilization technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Reactors Design for Industrial Applications)
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