Special Issue "Reactions in Water and in Micelles"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alessandro Scarso

Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca' Foscari di Venezia, via Torino 155, Venice 30172, Italy
E-Mail
Phone: +39 041-2348569

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic synthesis and catalysis are, nowadays, strongly tied to green chemistry and proper solvent selection is one of the first decision to ensure a low impact of a chemical transformation. Water as solvent has been selected by nature to carry out all kind of reactions. Water as a solvent is characterized by a very large number of advantages, such as low cost, it is non-toxic, non-flammable, it does not contribute to greenhouse emissions, it does not require synthesis and has a low E factor; it is the green solvent par excellence. New concepts like "in water" catalysis when the system is homogeneous to "on water" catalysis when the reaction is catalyzed by simple mixing the reactants with water under heterogeneous conditions and micellar catalysis in particular are all aspects that contributes to make water a true green solvent. 

In this Special Issue, I would like to highlight manuscripts focusing on all aspects of reactivity in water as solvent. The poor solubility of organic species in water that often represents a limitation, can be exploited favorably in terms of the potentialities offered by the hydrophobic effect with positive consequences on activity and selectivity of chemical transformations. I strongly encourage colleagues to submit their contributions dealing with reactivity in water and in micelles because I think that this Special Issue will strongly contribute to the progress in this research field and will play a key role in shaping the opinion of colleagues that are still "water skeptic". Last, but not least, a deeper understanding of reactivity in water will spur the understanding of reactivity in biological systems. 

Prof. Dr. Alessandro Scarso
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Water

  • Hydrophobic effect

  • Green solvent

  • Micelles

  • Selectivity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Dehydrogenative Transformation of Alcoholic Substrates in Aqueous Media Catalyzed by an Iridium Complex Having a Functional Ligand with α-Hydroxypyridine and 4,5-Dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl Moieties
Catalysts 2018, 8(8), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8080312
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 31 July 2018
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Abstract
A new catalytic system that employs water as an environmentally friendly solvent for the dehydrogenative oxidation of alcohols and lactonization of diols has been developed. In this catalytic system, a water-soluble dicationic iridium complex having a functional ligand that comprises α-hydroxypyridine and 4,5-dihydro-1
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A new catalytic system that employs water as an environmentally friendly solvent for the dehydrogenative oxidation of alcohols and lactonization of diols has been developed. In this catalytic system, a water-soluble dicationic iridium complex having a functional ligand that comprises α-hydroxypyridine and 4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl moieties exhibits high catalytic performance. For example, the catalytic dehydrogenative oxidation of 1-phenylethanol in the presence of 0.25 mol % of the iridium catalyst and base under reflux in water proceeded to give acetophenone in 92% yield. Additionally, under similar reaction conditions, the iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenative lactonization of 1,2-benzenedimethanol gave phthalide in 98% yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactions in Water and in Micelles)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Optimization and in Silico Analysis of a Cold-Adapted Lipase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. Strain AMS8 Reaction in Triton X-100 Reverse Micelles
Catalysts 2018, 8(7), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8070289
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 11 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
A moderate yield of a purified enzyme can be achieved by using the simple technique of reverse micellar extraction (RME). RME is a liquid–liquid extraction method that uses a surfactant and an organic solvent to extract biomolecules. Instead of traditional chromatographic purification methods,
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A moderate yield of a purified enzyme can be achieved by using the simple technique of reverse micellar extraction (RME). RME is a liquid–liquid extraction method that uses a surfactant and an organic solvent to extract biomolecules. Instead of traditional chromatographic purification methods, which are tedious and expensive, RME using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 and toluene is used as an alternative purification technique to purify a recombinant cold-adapted lipase, AMS8. Various process parameters were optimized to maximize the activity recovery of the AMS8 lipase. The optimal conditions were found to be 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7, 0.125 M NaCl, and 0.07 M Triton X-100 in toluene at 10 °C. Approximately 56% of the lipase activity was successfully recovered. Structural analysis of the lipase in a reverse micelle (RM) was performed using an in silico approach. The predicted model of AMS8 lipase was simulated in the Triton X-100/toluene reverse micelles from 5 to 40 °C. The lid 2 was slightly opened at 10 °C. However, the secondary structure of AMS8 was most affected in the non-catalytic domain compared to the catalytic domain, with an increased coil conformation. These results suggest that an AMS8 lipase can be extracted using Triton X-100/water/toluene micelles at low temperature. This RME approach will be an important tool for the downstream processing of recombinant cold-adapted lipases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactions in Water and in Micelles)
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Open AccessArticle Isolation, Characterization, and Environmental Application of Bio-Based Materials as Auxiliaries in Photocatalytic Processes
Catalysts 2018, 8(5), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8050197
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 3 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1656 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sustainable alternative substrates for advanced applications represent an increasing field of research that attracts the attention of worldwide experts (in accordance with green chemistry principles). In this context, bio-based substances (BBS) isolated from urban composted biowaste were purified and characterized. Additionally, these materials
[...] Read more.
Sustainable alternative substrates for advanced applications represent an increasing field of research that attracts the attention of worldwide experts (in accordance with green chemistry principles). In this context, bio-based substances (BBS) isolated from urban composted biowaste were purified and characterized. Additionally, these materials were tested as auxiliaries in advanced oxidizing photocatalytic processes for the abatement of organic contaminants in aqueous medium. Results highlighted the capability of these substances to enhance efficiency in water remediation treatments under mild conditions, favoring the entire light-driven photocatalytic process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactions in Water and in Micelles)
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Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication A New Mn–Salen Micellar Nanoreactor for Enantioselective Epoxidation of Alkenes in Water
Catalysts 2018, 8(4), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8040129
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 25 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2039 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A new chiral Mn–salen catalyst, functionalized with a long aliphatic chain and a choline group, able to act as surfactant catalyst for green epoxidation in water, is here described. This catalyst was employed with a commercial surfactant (CTABr) leading to a nanoreactor for
[...] Read more.
A new chiral Mn–salen catalyst, functionalized with a long aliphatic chain and a choline group, able to act as surfactant catalyst for green epoxidation in water, is here described. This catalyst was employed with a commercial surfactant (CTABr) leading to a nanoreactor for the enantioselective epoxidation of some selected alkenes in water, using NaClO as oxidant. This is the first example of a nanoreactor for enantioselective epoxidation of non-functionalized alkenes in water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactions in Water and in Micelles)
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Graphical abstract

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