Exhaust Gas Control Catalysis

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 6811

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Materials and Process Engineering (IMPE), School of Engineering (SoE), Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), CH-8400 Winterthur, Switzerland
Interests: environmental catalysis; in situ/operando spectroscopy

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Guest Editor
Department of Material and Life Chemistry, Kanagawa University, 3-27-1 Rokkakubashi, Yokohama, Kanagawa-ku 221-8686, Japan
Interests: mechanistic study of heterogeneous catalysis; surface science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental protection is one of the major concerns worldwide in human society because anthropogenic emissions of pollutants from combustion engines pose a serious threat to human health and ecological balance. In recent decades, technological advances in heterogeneous catalysis have contributed to the purification of exhaust gases.

This Special Issue welcomes review papers and original research papers focused on the synthetic method and spectroscopic characterization of catalytic materials and their application in NOx abatement. A particular focus is given to recent advances in bimetallic catalysts, the promotion effect of additives, and fine dispersion of active metal nanoparticles on porous materials to reduce the amount of noble metal usage. State-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques which allow in situ/operando monitoring of catalytic solid–gas interfaces and bulk materials under reaction conditions are also one of the central topics in this Special Issue.

Dr. Nobutaka Maeda
Dr. Shuichi Naito
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • NOx removal
  • NO direct decomposition
  • Three-way catalyst
  • NOx storage reduction
  • NOx-SCR
  • N2O decomposition
  • NO oxidation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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31 pages, 30287 KiB  
Article
Ordered Nanostructure Catalysts Efficient for NOx Storage/Reduction (NSR) Processes
by Shuichi Naito
Catalysts 2021, 11(11), 1348; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11111348 - 9 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2083
Abstract
NOx emissions in the atmosphere can cause various environmental problems, which should be strictly controlled and regulated. Furthermore, because of the limited amount of crude oil resources in the world and severe global warming, the development of fuel-efficient vehicles has long been desired. [...] Read more.
NOx emissions in the atmosphere can cause various environmental problems, which should be strictly controlled and regulated. Furthermore, because of the limited amount of crude oil resources in the world and severe global warming, the development of fuel-efficient vehicles has long been desired. Accordingly, efficient NOx storage and reduction catalysts have been developed over the decades, called NSR (NOx storage/reduction) catalysts. In the present article, recent advances in NSR catalysts which possess ordered nanostructures will be summarized, including our noble Pt/KNO3/K-titanate nanobelt (KTN), Pt-KNO3/CeO2 and Pt-KNO3/ZrO2 catalysts, as well as nanoporous Ni-phosphate (VSB-5) and Co-substituted VSB-5 catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exhaust Gas Control Catalysis)
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10 pages, 2573 KiB  
Article
Investigation on the Cause of the SO2 Generation during Hot Gas Desulfurization (HGD) Process
by Byungwook Hwang, Jung Hwan Kim, Doyeon Lee, Hyungseok Nam, Ha Na Kim, Jeom In Baek and Ho-Jung Ryu
Catalysts 2021, 11(8), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11080985 - 17 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1478
Abstract
In the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, the sulfur compounds present in coal are converted to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) when the coal is gasified. Due to its harmful effects on sorbent/solvent and environmental regulations, H2S needs to be [...] Read more.
In the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, the sulfur compounds present in coal are converted to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) when the coal is gasified. Due to its harmful effects on sorbent/solvent and environmental regulations, H2S needs to be removed from the product gas stream. To simulate the H2S removal process, desulfurization was carried out using a dry sorbent as a fluidizing material within a bubbling, high-temperature fluidized bed reactor. The ZnO-based sorbent showed not only an excellent capacity of H2S removal but also long-term stability. However, unexpected SO2 gas at a concentration of several hundred ppm was detected during the desulfurization reaction. Thus, we determined that there is an unknown source that supplies oxygen to ZnS, and identified the oxygen supplier through three possibilities: oxygen by reactant (fresh sorbent, ZnO), byproduct (ZnSO4), and product (H2O). From the experiment results, we found that the H2O produced from the reaction reacts with ZnS, resulting in SO2 gas being generated during desulfurization. The unknown oxygen source during desulfurization was deduced to be oxygen from H2O produced during desulfurization. That is, the oxygen from produced H2O reacts with ZnS, leading to SO2 generation at high temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exhaust Gas Control Catalysis)
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11 pages, 2390 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Effects of Bimetallic AuPd and La2O3 in the Catalytic Reduction of NO with CO
by Xianwei Wang, Nobutaka Maeda and Daniel M. Meier
Catalysts 2021, 11(8), 916; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11080916 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1797
Abstract
Bimetallic AuPd nanoparticles supported on TiO2 are known to catalyze the reduction of NO with CO. Here, we investigated the effects of the addition of lanthanum oxide to a AuPd/TiO2 catalyst with a AuPd particle size of 2.1–2.2 nm. The addition [...] Read more.
Bimetallic AuPd nanoparticles supported on TiO2 are known to catalyze the reduction of NO with CO. Here, we investigated the effects of the addition of lanthanum oxide to a AuPd/TiO2 catalyst with a AuPd particle size of 2.1–2.2 nm. The addition of La2O3 enhanced the catalytic activity; for example, at 250 °C, there was 40.9% NO conversion and 49.3% N2-selectivity for AuPd/TiO2, and 100% NO conversion and 100% N2-selectivity for AuPd-La (1:1)/TiO2. The temperature requiring 100% NO conversion dropped from 400 °C to 200 °C by the simple post-impregnation of La2O3 onto AuPd/TiO2. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) combined with modulation excitation spectroscopy (MES) demonstrated that CO adsorption occurs first on Au atoms and then, within 80 s, moves onto Pd atoms. This transformation between two adsorption sites was facilitated by the addition of La2O3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exhaust Gas Control Catalysis)
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