Special Issue "Recent Advances in Carbon Dots"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Constantine D. Stalikas

Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carbon nanodots with analytical and biomedical applications; nanomaterials and microextraction
Guest Editor
Dr. Theodoros G. Chatzimitakos

Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of carbon dots from natural (re)sources; development of photoluminescent analytical probes based on carbon dots; exploring novel biological applications of carbon dots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, carbon-based nanomaterials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, etc., have gained tremendous interest and more and more applications reap their numerous benefits. Lately, carbon nanodots (CNDs) have emerged as a new class of carbon-based nanomaterials, which have "outshined" other carbon-based nanomaterials, as they possess a unique combination of outstanding, enthralling and favorable properties for many applications. They are the sole carbon nanomaterials with inherent photoluminescence whereby multitudinous applications have been developed. They have been utilized as probes for analytical or biological applications, bioimaging agents for live cell and animal imaging purposes, drug carriers, photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy as well as in photocatalysis, solar cells, optronics, etc. The CNDs have come into their own as a standalone research field but their full potential is yet to be unraveled and harnessed. To understand their properties and gain deep knowledge on the subject, concise reviews and state-of-the-art research articles are needed.

In this context, we launched a Special Issue of C—Journal of Carbon Research, “Recent Advances in Carbon Dots”, which is dedicated to the advancement of this novel field. We invite authors to submit original research articles, communications and reviews, related to all advances in the field of CNDs.

Prof. Constantine D. Stalikas
Dr. Theodoros G. Chatzimitakos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon dots
  • Photoluminescence
  • Analytical probes
  • Bioimaging
  • Drug delivery
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Solar cells

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Temperature-Dependence of Solvent-Induced Stokes Shift and Fluorescence Tunability in Carbon Nanodots
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
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Abstract
We carried out a cryogenic investigation on the optical properties of carbon dots, aiming to better understand their emission mechanism and the role of the solvent. The solvatochromic Stokes shift is quantified by a low temperature approach which allows freezing of the photo-excited [...] Read more.
We carried out a cryogenic investigation on the optical properties of carbon dots, aiming to better understand their emission mechanism and the role of the solvent. The solvatochromic Stokes shift is quantified by a low temperature approach which allows freezing of the photo-excited state of carbon dots, preventing any solvation relaxation. Moreover, the reduction in temperature helps to identify the dynamical inhomogeneous contribution to the broadening of the emission band; therefore, disentangling the role of solvent from other types of broadening, such as the homogeneous and the static inhomogeneous contributions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Carbon Dots)
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Open AccessArticle
Fluorescent Carbon Dots Ink for Gravure Printing
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 8 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
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Abstract
In the present article, we describe the use of highly fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) for the preparation of an effective water-based carbon dot ink (CD-ink) for gravure printing. Carbon dots were prepared hydrothermally from citrate and triethylenetetramine, and mixed properly with certain resins [...] Read more.
In the present article, we describe the use of highly fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) for the preparation of an effective water-based carbon dot ink (CD-ink) for gravure printing. Carbon dots were prepared hydrothermally from citrate and triethylenetetramine, and mixed properly with certain resins that are used in gravure inks. The as-produced CD gravure ink was used successfully for printing high quality fluorescent images. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Carbon Dots)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advancements in Doped/Co-Doped Carbon Quantum Dots for Multi-Potential Applications
Received: 31 March 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 28 April 2019 / Published: 6 May 2019
PDF Full-text (2385 KB)
Abstract
Carbon quantum dots (CQDs)/carbon nanodots are a new class of fluorescent carbon nanomaterials having an approximate size in the range of 2–10 nm. The majority of the reported review articles have discussed about the development of the CQDs (via simple and cost-effective synthesis [...] Read more.
Carbon quantum dots (CQDs)/carbon nanodots are a new class of fluorescent carbon nanomaterials having an approximate size in the range of 2–10 nm. The majority of the reported review articles have discussed about the development of the CQDs (via simple and cost-effective synthesis methods) for use in bio-imaging and chemical-/biological-sensing applications. However, there is a severe lack of consolidated studies on the recently developed CQDs (especially doped/co-doped) that are utilized in different areas of application. Hence, in this review, we have extensively discussed about the recent development in doped and co-doped CQDs (using elements/heteroatoms—e.g., boron (B), fluorine (F), nitrogen (N), sulphur (S), and phosphorous (P)), along with their synthesis method, reaction conditions, and/or quantum yield (QY), and their emerging multi-potential applications including electrical/electronics (such as light emitting diode (LED) and solar cells), fluorescent ink for anti-counterfeiting, optical sensors (for detection of metal ions, drugs, and pesticides/fungicides), gene delivery, and temperature probing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Carbon Dots)
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Open AccessReview
Bioimaging Applications of Carbon Nanodots: A Review
Received: 31 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
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Abstract
Carbon nanodots (CNDs) is the newest member of carbon-based nanomaterials and one of the most promising for the development of new, advanced applications. Owing to their unique and unparalleled physicochemical and photoluminescent properties, they are considered to be a rising star among nanomaterials. [...] Read more.
Carbon nanodots (CNDs) is the newest member of carbon-based nanomaterials and one of the most promising for the development of new, advanced applications. Owing to their unique and unparalleled physicochemical and photoluminescent properties, they are considered to be a rising star among nanomaterials. During the last decade, many applications have been developed based on CNDs. Among others, they have been used as bioimaging agents to label cells and tissues. In this review, we will discuss the advancements in the applications of CNDs in in the field of imaging, in all types of organisms (i.e., prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and animals). Selective imaging of one type of cells over another, imaging of (bio)molecules inside cells and tumor-targeting imaging are some of the studies that will be discussed hereafter. We hope that this review will assist researchers with obtaining a holistic view of the developed applications and hit on new ideas so that more advanced applications can be developed in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Carbon Dots)
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