Advanced Research on Airflow and Pollutant Dispersion in Building Systems

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 4957

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Automotive and Transportation Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui, China
Interests: Outdoor environmental quality; Tunnel ventilation; Built environment simulation; Pollutant dispersion in street canyons; Smoke movement
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, China
Interests: tunnel ventilation; built environment simulation; pollutant dispersion in underground spaces; smoke movement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the global trend towards increasing urbanization, a great deal of attention has been paid to the deterioration of the urban environment, including the airflow and pollution dispersion around buildings, building arrays, specific building structures (tunnels and underground spaces), and street canyons. Air pollution represents a threat to the physical and mental health of pedestrians and people indoors on both sides of street canyons. Urban environment control and design have become important directions of urban construction and development. Field measurements, wind tunnel or scaled-model experiment, and numerical simulations are widely used for analyzing the urban atmospheric environment.

Therefore, this Special Issue intends to encourage researchers and practitioners in airflow and pollutant dispersion to submit their works in order to improve the urban climate and living environment. Research papers related to airflow and pollutant dispersion in building systems are welcomed, including but not limited to indoor and outdoor environment quality, natural ventilation of buildings, building environment simulation, pollutant dispersion in street canyons, and tunnel ventilation.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Changfa Tao
Dr. Yang Zhou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • built environment simulation
  • effective control of pollutant dispersion
  • air exchange between indoor and outdoor environment
  • smoke movement
  • pollutant dispersion in the street canyons
  • tunnel ventilation
  • dispersion of harmful chemicals

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 6920 KiB  
Article
Study on the Air Inlet Velocity and Temperature Distribution in an Inclined Tunnel with Single Shaft under Natural Ventilation
by Liang Yi, Shihan Lan, Xiaofei Wang, Rongwei Bu, Jiaming Zhao and Yang Zhou
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 842; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040842 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1392
Abstract
The emergence of inclined tunnels under natural ventilation has brought many new fire safety issues. The smoke movement in the tunnel is affected by the chimney effect induced by the shaft and the downstream tunnel. The characteristics of temperature distribution in inclined tunnels [...] Read more.
The emergence of inclined tunnels under natural ventilation has brought many new fire safety issues. The smoke movement in the tunnel is affected by the chimney effect induced by the shaft and the downstream tunnel. The characteristics of temperature distribution in inclined tunnels are different from horizontal tunnels, which is worthy of further study. A series of conditions were carried out in an inclined model tunnel with a single shaft to investigate the temperature distribution characteristics. In this study, the longitudinal air inlet velocity is used to replace the longitudinal ventilation wind velocity. Results showed that the variation of fire source location Lf,, shaft height Ls, and the tunnel slope φ have obvious effect on the air inlet velocity. Based on the previous theories and the non-dimension analysis, the formulas of the dimensionless longitudinal inlet air velocity and the distribution of the maximum smoke temperature under the ceiling are proposed, which show good consistency with the simulation results. The reduced-scale experiments were conducted to validate the results of numerical simulation. The error range between the theoretical results and the simulation results is less than 20%. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 10811 KiB  
Article
Ionization Air Purifying Lattice Prototype
by Manuel Armando Atancuri and Juan-Carlos Cobos-Torres
Buildings 2023, 13(3), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13030634 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1855
Abstract
Environmental pollution caused by human activities, the harmful mixture of gases (CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, PM), resulting from industrial production processes and vehicular traffic is a global environmental health problem in urban and rural areas; it affects [...] Read more.
Environmental pollution caused by human activities, the harmful mixture of gases (CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, PM), resulting from industrial production processes and vehicular traffic is a global environmental health problem in urban and rural areas; it affects vulnerable groups, children and older adults, affecting respiratory, cardiovascular and cancerous diseases. In Ecuador, in the city of Cuenca, among the main sources of contamination is the vehicle fleet in high-traffic areas and avenues; in addition to the industrial zone, that coexists with the city within the urban area in the northwest zone, which generates contamination to properties located around these strips. This paper presents the development of a purifying element based on the “evolutionary development” model. It begins by analyzing and studying concepts of lattices, ionization, and air purification, among others; subsequently, existing air purification systems are investigated in detail and a prototype of an ionizing lattice is generated, whose function is to filter polluted air when installed as an aesthetic part in buildings. Finally, the purification performance of gases and particles typical of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was tested by means of air quality stations. By means of a type of correlational applied research, the similarity between external and internal gases and particulate matter was verified, obtaining, as a result, the effective reduction of the same; decreasing by 4.15% of CO2, 30% of CO and 57% of particulate matter. With this analysis, it is concluded that the prototype of the ionization air purifying lattice can be efficient with some of the gases against particulate pollution in domestic interiors, positively influencing the health of the inhabitants of a building. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 42592 KiB  
Article
Development of a Prediction Model of the Pedestrian Mean Velocity Based on LES of Random Building Arrays
by Sheikh Ahmad Zaki, Saidatul Sharin Shuhaimi, Ahmad Faiz Mohammad, Mohamed Sukri Mat Ali, Khairur Rijal Jamaludin and Mardiana Idayu Ahmad
Buildings 2022, 12(9), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12091362 - 2 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1128
Abstract
Wind speed in urban areas is influenced by the interaction between wind flow and building geometry; at the pedestrian level, the interaction is more complex, particularly with high building density. This study investigated the wind velocity distribution and the mean velocity ratio at [...] Read more.
Wind speed in urban areas is influenced by the interaction between wind flow and building geometry; at the pedestrian level, the interaction is more complex, particularly with high building density. This study investigated the wind velocity distribution and the mean velocity ratio at the pedestrian level using the large-eddy simulation (LES) database based on random building arrays of several plan area densities, λp. The heights of random buildings are between 0.36 h and 3.76 h where h = 0.025 m. Mean streamwise velocity profiles were obtained at the pedestrian level for all arrays and were found to decrease as λp increased. Wind flow patterns at the pedestrian level were highly influenced by adjacent buildings, especially in denser conditions, λp > 0.17. The pedestrian-level mean velocity was obtained around each building, and the relationship between the local mean velocity ratio, Vp(t) and the local frontal area density, λf(t) was analyzed. Subsequently, a prediction model was formulated based on the building’s aspect ratio, αp; the correlation for high-rise buildings with 2.64 hαp ≤ 3.76 h was high at 0.8, while a lower correlation was obtained for lower buildings due to random positioning and surrounding geometric effects. Therefore, the impact of high-rise buildings on pedestrian wind velocity can be estimated more accurately using the formulated model. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop