Advanced Seismic Protection Technologies for New and Existing Structures

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 11532

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Florence, 50139 Florence, Italy
Interests: earthquake engineering; structural engineering; structural rehabilitation; advanced seismic protection technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent earthquakes that hit several seismic areas worldwide, causing lots of fatalities and extensive damage to the built environment, highlighted once again the need for extensive retrofit interventions on existing structures and infrastructures that were not designed for seismic action, as well as the need for enhanced anti-seismic design strategies for new structures.

The advanced seismic protection technologies belonging to the classes of base isolation and supplemental energy dissipation are playing an increasing role in this respect. Indeed, after the development of the first “modern” applications of systems pertaining to both classes, dating back to the 1970s, their use has been progressively extended from high-seismicity countries, such as Japan, USA, and New Zealand, to many other countries with moderate-to-medium seismicity territories. The benefits of these technologies lie in the possibility of reaching a safe and undamaged response for newly designed or retrofitted structures and infrastructures up to the maximum considered normative earthquake levels adopted by the most recent generation of the reference Technical Standards.

This Special Issue will provide the latest research and application achievements in the field of advanced seismic protection technologies, including emerging aspects in the theoretical, modelling, design, testing, practical implementation and normative-related studies of base isolation and supplemental damping devices and systems.

Prof. Dr. Gloria Terenzi
Guest Editor

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Keywords

Base isolation

  1. Modelling and design of base isolation systems applied to new and existing buildings
  2. Experimental tests on base isolation systems
  3. Practical implementation and normative-related studies of base isolation systems applied to new and existing buildings

Energy dissipation

  1. Modelling and design of supplemental damping systems applied to new and existing buildings
  2. Experimental tests on supplemental damping systems
  3. Practical implementation and normative-related studies of supplemental damping systems applied to new and existing buildings

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 7473 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Seismic Retrofit of a Reinforced Concrete Building of Architectural Interest
by Gloria Terenzi, Elena Fuso, Stefano Sorace and Iacopo Costoli
Buildings 2020, 10(11), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10110211 - 21 Nov 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3068
Abstract
Modern heritage buildings designed in the 1950s and 1960s often feature poor seismic performance capacities and may require significant retrofit interventions. A representative case study in Florence, i.e., the edifice housing the Automobile Club Headquarters, is examined here. The building was designed in [...] Read more.
Modern heritage buildings designed in the 1950s and 1960s often feature poor seismic performance capacities and may require significant retrofit interventions. A representative case study in Florence, i.e., the edifice housing the Automobile Club Headquarters, is examined here. The building was designed in 1959 with an articulated reinforced concrete structure and presents some enterprising solutions for the time, including suspended floors accommodating large glazed curtain wall façades in the main halls. The original design documentation was collected with accurate record research and checked with detailed on-site surveys. Based on the information gained on the structural system by this preliminary investigation, a time-history assessment analysis was carried out. Remarkable strength deficiencies in most members and severe pounding conditions between the two constituting wings, which are separated by a narrow technical gap, were found. As a result, a base isolation retrofit hypothesis is proposed in order to improve the seismic response capacities of the building without altering its elegant architectural appearance, being characterized by large free internal spaces and well-balanced proportions of the main structural members. A substantial performance improvement is obtained thanks to this rehabilitation strategy, as assessed by the achievement of non-pounding response conditions and safe stress states for all members up to the maximum considered normative earthquake level. Furthermore, the very low peak inter-storey drifts evaluated in retrofitted conditions help in preventing damage to the glazed façades and the remaining drift-sensitive non-structural components. Full article
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27 pages, 4859 KiB  
Article
Effects of Dissipative Systems on the Seismic Behavior of Irregular Buildings—Two Case Studies
by Marco Miani, Caterina Di Marco, Giada Frappa and Margherita Pauletta
Buildings 2020, 10(11), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10110202 - 7 Nov 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2576
Abstract
Conservation of heritage buildings has become a very important issue in many countries, as it is in Italy, where a great number of existing buildings of historical–artistic importance are seismically vulnerable. To improve existing building behavior, researchers focus on the design of retrofit [...] Read more.
Conservation of heritage buildings has become a very important issue in many countries, as it is in Italy, where a great number of existing buildings of historical–artistic importance are seismically vulnerable. To improve existing building behavior, researchers focus on the design of retrofit interventions. This paper presents the application of energy dissipation devices in the retrofit of two existing Reinforced Concrete (RC) buildings, both irregular in plan and along their heights, designed for gravitational loads only. These buildings are representative of Italian public housing built in the 1960s and early 1970s. Technical information and mechanical properties of materials are presented, and non-linear analyses are carried out to evaluate the buildings’ behavior under earthquake loads. Many of their structural members do not satisfy the verifications required by the Italian Building Code. Retrofit interventions with buckling-restrained axial dampers in one building and viscous fluid dampers in the other are proposed. The verifications of the retrofitted buildings and the amount of the energy absorbed by the devices with respect to that absorbed by the unretrofitted buildings show the effectiveness of the proposed interventions. Moreover, it is demonstrated that adequate dispositions of the dissipative devices in plan and along the height increase the torsional stiffness of the buildings, improving their structural response under seismic action. Full article
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19 pages, 6913 KiB  
Article
The Structural Performance of Reinforced Concrete Members with Monolithic Non-Structural Walls under Static and Dynamic Loads
by Walid Ahmad Safi, Yo Hibino, Koichi Kusunoki, Tomohisa Mukai, Yasushi Sanada, Izumi Nakamura and Satoru Fukai
Buildings 2020, 10(5), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10050087 - 6 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5185
Abstract
The required base shear and drift limit for post-disaster management buildings have increased in the Japanese Building Code following major seismic events. One method to satisfy these requirements for reinforced concrete frame buildings is to cast exterior non-structural concrete wall elements to be [...] Read more.
The required base shear and drift limit for post-disaster management buildings have increased in the Japanese Building Code following major seismic events. One method to satisfy these requirements for reinforced concrete frame buildings is to cast exterior non-structural concrete wall elements to be monolithic with frame elements, but without anchoring the longitudinal wall reinforcing. This provides additional stiffness and strength while limiting significant damage in the non-structural wall. In this study, the structural performances of such elements were evaluated using static and dynamic experimental tests. The result indicates that non-structural walls that were neither isolated by seismic slits nor anchored to the adjacent walls with longitudinal reinforcements experienced less damage and higher deformability compared with walls having seismic slits. The confinement reinforcing impact was not observed on the strength and drift capacity of the beam member, owing to the large number of transverse reinforcements. However, the confinements limited the damage and nearly prevented concrete crushing. The maximum horizontal load of the specimen could be predicted using cross-sectional analysis, and the authors propose a simple equation to predict it with sufficient accuracy. Full article
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